Labour on free speech, then & now

Labour has a less than honest approach to free speech.

Andrew Little issued the following statement on 8 January 2015:

“The attack on the Charlie Hebdo newspaper is an assault on democracy and freedom of expression. Violence against journalists is abhorrent and must not be tolerated in any form.

“This attack should be seen for what it is – an attempt to instil fear in those who would exercise their universal freedoms of thought and expression, which is all of us.

A year earlier they were saying this:

Asked if the government should ban Facebook, Clarke replied, “The government should always have in its back pocket the ability to ban websites.”

Of course they were also responsible from one of the worse attacks on freedom of expression and free speech with their hated Electoral Finance Act in 2007, brought in to debate in elections.

So, excuse me if I think Andrew Little’s claims to stand for freedom of speech, democracy and freedom of expression when Labour has repeatedly shown that they are not a party of freedom, they are in fact a party of restrictions.

Crying crocodile tears when their actions in the past are to ban and restrict is as insulting as it would have been if they’d cuddled up to the terrorists.

 

– NBR

 


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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