News is dead, long live news!

newspapers-are-dead

Netguide’s onto it

More Kiwis are reading newspapers online, according to a survey on the use of digital media.

The survey, conducted by local PR firm Impact PR, shows more than two-thirds of Kiwis have read a newspaper online, or on a smartphone or tablet app, during the past year.

While uptake of electronic newspapers was high across the board, over three-quarters of those surveyed aged from 35 to 44 years old had read one online, and 61% of those aged over 65 had also done so. One in five Kiwis expects to read newspapers online or via an app in the next 12 months, according to the survey.

“What is heartening to see from this survey, is that Kiwis still have an appetite for news and want to be informed on what is happening around them,” says Fleur Revell, Impact PR director.

Of course they do.  There is an innate need for gossip and story telling that is very much part of being a human being.  

“Clearly the emergence of online newspapers is something that Kiwis have taken to quickly and I think this growth is likely to continue as the convenience of digital media becomes even more ubiquitous through smart devices.”

Despite the popularity of digital newspapers, and many people expecting to increase their use of digital media when it comes to reading both newspapers and books online, there are widespread concerns about how this will affect literacy.

“Over half of those surveyed believe the increasing digital media consumption in New Zealand will have a negative impact on literacy levels here,” says Revell. “Even the 18-24 year olds who have grown up in a digitally-savvy world are concerned, with 47% believing this will have a negative result.”

While newspapers have a strong digital uptake, consumers appear to prefer their magazines printed, with just 25% of people saying they have downloaded or read an electronic magazine in the last year. Most consumers also don’t intend to seek out magazines in a digital form either – with 41% of those surveyed not intending to download or view an e-magazine in the next 12 months.

The time is indeed right for a New Zealand internet-delivered news service that doesn’t have the infrastructural, administrative, financial and political problems to bog it down.

A fresh start.

 

– Netguide


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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