Revisiting Green party press releases

In 2008 the Green party issued this press release:

The Green Party is warning that today’s record breaking crude oil price of US$100 per barrel is just the first flirtation in what is going to be a long term relationship with triple digits in an ongoing trend of rising oil prices.

The price of oil reportedly surged during the first trading day in the New Year with light sweet crude rising US$4.02 to US$100 a barrel in New York.

“The era of cheap oil has been over for some time. While today’s price breaks a psychological limit, the long term trend indicates that oil may not be consistently priced this high until July or August. However, that’s very short time in planning terms and it is extremely urgent that we re-examine our budget priorities for roading, public transport and freight,” Co-Leader Jeanette Fitzsimons says.

While today’s price of US$100 did retreat soon after breaking the record, prices will never retreat back to the lows of just a few years ago.

“While there isn’t any need to panic, it is a clear signal that we should be planning for an oil constrained future. This means changing the way we get around, investing in more public transport and better urban design that supports walking and cycling. You only need to look at the major cities around the world that were built before the oil age to see that vibrant, exciting lifestyles are possible without depending on the private motor vehicle.

“If you read my latest Bill to be drawn, Climate Change (Transport Funding) Bill, you’ll see a phased programme for refocusing priorities towards more sustainable transport and reducing our reliance on fossil fuels.”

The BBC reports today:

The price of Brent crude oil has fallen below $50 a barrel for the first time since May 2009.

It fell more than a dollar to $49.92 a barrel in early trading on Wednesday before edging back above the $50 mark.

Slowing global growth and increased supply of oil and gas have pushed prices sharply lower in recent weeks.

The price of oil traded in the United States, known as West Texas Intermediate crude, has already fallen below $50.

Many observers expect the price of oil to fall further as North American shale producers continue to supply increasing quantities of oil and gas, and the oil-producing group Opec resists calls for cuts in production to support prices.

“With no sign that Opec will do anything about over-production, it seems likely that we could well see further declines towards $40 in the coming weeks,” said CMC Markets analyst Michael Hewson.

And the NZ Herald runs an article that says:

The drop in fuel prices – to the lowest in more than four years – is expected to have a knock-on effect on other products as businesses spend less on transporting goods, meaning lower prices for consumers.

However, shoppers may be reluctant to flash their hard-earned cash after being burned by the global financial crisis, experts say, and may put the extra dollars into savings.

New Zealand has seen a record run of price cuts, with 16 over the past three months, as a combination of falling global crude oil prices and a strong Kiwi dollar works in motorists’ favour.

Remember when you see a Green part press release it is based on what they want to happen not what will happen.

The best policy of dealing with the Greens is to ignore them.

 

– NZ Herald, Green Party


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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