Sometimes you wonder where some people get their ideas from

Neville Gibson, editor at the NBR writes:

The assassinations of journalists and cartoonists at a satirical French newspaper will add to a wave of anti-Islamic feeling in Europe.

Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators have turned out in Paris, Lyons and other cities to defend freedom of speech and western democratic values against terrorism. In London, a demonstration has been held in Trafalgar Square.

The rallying call is “Je suis Charlie” (“I am Charlie”)  – a reference to President Kennedy’s speech at the Berlin Wall in the 1960s and to the name of the weekly Charlie Hebdo, whose offices were invaded by three hooded gunmen at 11.30am Parisian time on Wednesday.

Let’s start with his gutlessness at not calling things for what they are.

These were not “three hooded gunmen”….they were Islamic terrorists.

Look Neville, at what they did to a wounded gendarme.

There there is his inane explanation of what “Je suis Charlie” means.

Kennedy’s famous “Ich bin ein Berliner” speech has nothing whatsoever to do with “Je suis Charlie”.

Obviously Neville has never seen the movie Spartacus, or read about the legend of Spartacus, nor has he heard of the internet meme “I am Spartacus“.

Know your Meme explains:

The quote “I am Spartacus” is derived from the 1960 movie “Spartacus” directed by Stanley Kubrick and starring Kirk Douglas as the titular role. Near the end of the film, a Roman general announces to a group of former slaves that unsuccesfully fought againsts their rulers that unless Spartacus is turned over to them, all of the slaves will be crucified. Spartacus is then willing to turn himself in to protect his friends by standing up and proclaiming “I am Spartacus!”, but then the rest of the slaves show their loyalty to him by also proclaming that himself is Spartacus in great numbers. Since the general still doesn’t know who the real Spartacus is, all of the slaves are led to crucifixion.

Ich bin ein Berliner in a rather obtuse manner could possibly be used but the reality is on Twitter where the hashtag sprung up it is much more likely to have been the internet meme “I am Spartacus”.

 

– NBR


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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