UK wind turbines need national grid electricity to operate

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Yes, you read that right.

Off-shore wind turbines take power from the National Grid when not generating electricity, it has emerged.

They use electricity to keep their blades rotating slowly in cold weather to prevent them icing up and to power the systems which turn the blades into the wind.

It costs around twice as much to produce electricity using offshore wind than at traditional coal and gas-fired power stations.

But think about the feel good factor!!

Critics say it is a ‘folly’ that turbines need National Grid power even when idle….

The issue has flared up after one resident in North Wales told how he had observed more than 100 turbines off the coast ‘idling very slowly’ in freezing conditions.

Brian Christley, of Conwy, raised his concerns in a letter to The Daily Telegraph. He wrote: ‘Over the weekend just gone – the coldest of the year so far – all 100-plus offshore wind turbines along the North Wales coast were idling very slowly, all using grid power for de-icing and to power their hydraulic systems that keep the blades facing in the same direction.

When you think about it, it make sense that they need external power to change configuration when the wind isn’t actually suitable to do the job, but even so, it’s rather amusing that they draw power from the grid when they aren’t being useful.

– Daily Mail


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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