Whaleoil Backchat

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  • Eiselmann

    Easter eggs on sale at my local supermarket…this year is speeding by.

    • 1951

      Oh dear, that news should be kept from the Blubbergeddin contenders.

      • EveryWhichWayButLeft

        Chocolate… meh. It’s overrated.
        On the other hand, bacon!

        • ShortBackwardSquare

          Making my own bacon this week… can’t wait to taste the results.

          • sandalwood789

            Mmmm….. sounds good… :)

            I’ve really taken a liking to *biltong* in the last few months, especially one that I get that’s seasoned with chilli.
            Really good stuff.

          • ShortBackwardSquare

            Do you make your own? So easy. And horribly addictive!

          • intelligentes candida diva

            My dad used to make ours, brine made up and in a wooden oak barrel, it used to intrigue me how it came out salty and delicious

          • ShortBackwardSquare

            I’m using a dry method – poly bin with pork belly and around a kilo of salt. Five days in, five days to dry in the garage fridge after.

          • Don W

            Would that work with mutton.?

          • intelligentes candida diva

            Belly pork I always get that cut when I buy 1/2 a pig.
            Do you put other ingredients in
            It sounds like what is called”slab bacon”in cooking terms?

          • Nige.

            good on you. Let us know how you get on

        • I.M Bach

          Bacon should be consumed at every opportunity. I have just downed a late lunch of a wrap filled with chicken bbq’d in Hoisin sauce, bacon tomato, mayo and lettuce. Burp.

          • caochladh

            And a deep fried Mars bar for dessert?

          • pisces8284 .

            Bacon sandwich. White bread dipped in the fat. That is all

        • Lord Evans

          In support of the Blubbergeddons, my favourite salad, for your gastronomical enjoyment…

        • Nige.

          I has found the perfect chop out at riverlands just out of Blenheim.

          It tasted like a bacon steak with a bone attached.

        • intelligentes candida diva

          Here is a sweet treat with bacon recipe, I have made it and it is delicious sweet treat and bacon

          http://recipeofhealth.com/recipe/new-orleans-bacon-pralines-claire-robinson-535986rb

    • Cowgirl

      Christmas decorations came down and Valentine’s stuff went immediately up in all the stores here.

    • ShortBackwardSquare

      Yes, my favourite Cadbury marshmallow eggs are at the tills in New World just awaiting my impulse buy!

      • PhantomsDoc

        Just wait for them to stuff-up the recipe for those as well.

        • ShortBackwardSquare

          A British comedy show did a taste test last week:

          • MaryLou

            Had a couple the other day, used to be my favourite. Now they’ve changed the chocolate, on top of having changed the centre a few years ago – there’s nothing left I like. Why does Cadbury keep messing with important stuff? Not that long ago they decided to use Palm Oil in their chocolate, and had to back off quick smart.

            Sigh… Whittakers it is. The passing of an era…

          • 1951

            Why? They were taken over by Kraft.

          • MaryLou

            Yes, but I would’ve thought Kraft might have noticed that the brand had a life-long following. By changing what was good about the product has each time – alienated big parts of their market. After the palm oil debacle, I would have thought they’d think twice about messing with something so loved… we take our chocolate seriously!

          • 1951

            Agree, there was major changes made with production too. “.If it ain’t broke…..”

    • I.M Bach

      Same here, spotted them just an hour ago.

    • pisces8284 .

      Hot cross buns have been on sale for a while but bakers say that’s because supermarket’s bakers are using up old mincemeat

      http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/65412077/is-it-too-early-for-easter-supermarkets-say-no-bakers-say-yes

    • Dave

      They went on sale here in the first week in January. Whilst I like them, its way too early.

    • Platinum Fox

      I’ve been buying half price Christmas chocolate bells at the supermarket. BB dated 07/08/15. Don’t know if I have enough to get me through to the post-Easter discounted eggs though.

  • ShortBackwardSquare

    An interesting election result in Greece – headed hard left. So a huge increase in government spending on the way. They cannot pay what they have, so this will be watched with interest across the world. The elected leader can certainly run a campaign, so we will see if he canstare down Merkel, Hollande and the rest of Europe.

    There is some potential good news – Greece may be forced out of the euro, and that is likely to force massive pressure on Italian and Spanish bond markets (putting those countries at serious risk) but more than that may see the beginning of the end for the euro, in my view one of the world’s greatest financial cancers.

    Ceding central bank authority to another country is not a good idea.

    • sandalwood789

      “Ceding central bank authority to another country is not a good idea.”

      Agreed, and it’s not just that that they’ve ceded – democracy has taken a big hit as well.
      That particularly seems to be the case with immigration law. No country in the Eurozone is able to clamp down on immigration itself (as far as I can tell).

      • ShortBackwardSquare

        Not allowed to. As Merkel said just last week with Cameron, freedom of movement is not negotiable.

        • Disinfectant

          Just as well money doesn’t understand any restriction on freedom of movement.
          Edit: spelling.

      • Terence Hodgson

        Re immigration within the states: one is not able to stop the flow, but certain countries seem to have better (read more generous) social payments for unemployment, child support, housing benefits etc. Particularly England, and that is a destination country for many people from countries like Romania and Bulgaria where even reduced welfare payments in England are more than wages they would have achieved in their homeland. Re immigration from outside the EU; most alarm is at the millions wishing to get to Europe illegally, and for that purpose, the EU has a “supra” intelligence net called Frontex around its land mass, while certain countries are erecting fences along their border — the razor wire along the Evros River, for instance, to keep people out of Greece crossing from Turkey.

    • cows4me

      It was amazing to see the thousands clapping and celebrating the first far left government in six decades, Christmas and dopey Turkeys sprang to mind.

      • Don W

        There was a doco on Cue TV from German DW TV called the great Euro swindle showing how the Euro was set up . It implied that Greece manipulated it’s financial accounts in order to be accepted into the Euro Zone.

        • ShortBackwardSquare

          It sure did. There is no way Greece should have been allowed in to the euro, and they relied heavily on their historical ‘birthplace of intelligence’ argument. As an example of how rotten it is, Greece never declares in it’s accounts or budgets what it’s defence spending is. Just another black hole to pour money into.

          • Don W

            Politicians are quick to play loose and easy with other peoples hard earned money.

        • Terence Hodgson

          A monumental swindle. The Eurozone required that all prospective members had debt no more than a certain % of GDP. Greece lied, and it was found that their debt was hugely more than the requirement. Greece was found to be not too smart at collecting tax, and had thousands of dead people it was paying pensions to and thousands of civil servants who had lost their jobs but were still being paid.

      • Nige.

        They voted for more laziness and bludgging. The birthplace of civilization? If that’s the way the world evolves then we will be obeying the “screens” in no time.

        • cows4me

          It will be very interesting to watch, one of the worlds oldest so called civilized countries going to hell in a handcart all on glorious big screen, HD TV.

          • Don W

            A perfect example of how socialism destroys the fabric of mankind.

        • ex-JAFA

          Going to Hellas in a handbasket.

    • dumbshit

      I was told that a recent study by a large international bank found that the “black-market” could be as much as 26% of GDP, and the average of a basket of similar countries was 6%!

    • Grizz30

      Certainly the eyes will be on Greece. It is hard to judge your average Greek though. They have put up with corrupt politicians for decades and they have to put up with 25% unemployment, high taxes with little tangible to show for it. For many, how much worse could a Marxist/Green parliament make their lives. I suspect they will find out in time.

    • Cadwallader

      There is a bit of leftie hysteria dancing about regarding the TPPA. I actually spent much of Sunday reading the draft agreement. In all honesty I find nothing amiss with it. It describes clear pathways etc….some of the opposition to it is due to an apparent loss of “sovereignty.” If the alleged loss of sovereignty is a big issue to the TPPA’s opponents then to be consistent we ought abandon the UN and its concomitant raft of pointless treaties. Apparently some lefties are saying that JK wishes to push it through using diversionary tactics such as the Cricket World Cup…shock! Horror! I nearly went cross-eyed reading the draft agreement so it was a task, but I wager most of the leftie opponents will not have bothered, preferring to suck up to the contrived sound-bites spewing from the msm.

      • taurangaruru

        Good point re sovereignty & the UN, that is one to throw back in the lefties faces when the inevitable screeching starts re the TPP, sovereignty, big business etc

        • Cadwallader

          The screeching has already started with FB pages blaring from mindless lunatics etc… The objection from the left is the same old anti-free-trade rants re-packaged. The Leftie mantra seems to be that if you can’t understand it, hate it and berate it! Oh, and throw in a few hate filled sniggers at JK and the current government just to be sure.

  • I.M Bach

    Apparently Facebook has banned this Australia Day image as it has offended some people. It must be tough leading a humourless life.

    • sandalwood789

      Humourless is right, that’s a *great* image!

    • Eddie

      Facebook has some massive double-standards!
      I just hope no extremist Aussie decides to kill the author over it.

    • Murray Smith

      But they let me post this ?

      • Reaper

        Fun for the whole family?

        • Murray Smith

          Family roo………..t ?

        • Dave

          Only in Tasmania, cant comment further, except they prefer to keep it in the family.

  • sarahmw

    What has the female newsreader on One news done to her face? It just looks weird. Botox gone wrong?

    • willtin

      Aha, someone else noticed too. I think her eyes look particularly strange.

      • sarahmw

        They changed the camera angle. Maybe they read WO. Lol

        • Nige.

          They all do

  • caochladh

    Auckland Anniversary Day and no sign of PDB on One News.

    • Don W

      He probably has pressing business in the Ngati Whatua room.

    • Carl

      Was not shown on 3 either.

    • willtin

      My theory is; he couldn’t be seen because in his desperate desire to be seen, he tied himself to the smokestack of the William C. Daldy, he not being aware of what that baby pumps out.
      Edit Grammar

    • Effluent

      Be honest, we’ll miss him and his jolly antics when he’s gone.

      In any case, until someone credible from the other end of the spectrum shows up pretty soon, we’re stuck with him for another 3 years. Unless the govt acquires a spine and puts in the commissioners.

      • pak

        I am being completely honest – I will not miss that odious little man in the slightest, not for one milli-second. That we are stuck with him is the cause of much angst for me and I fear little prospect of any saviour appearing in the form of commissioners.

      • Nige.

        Expensive antics. Questionable ones too. He’s setting a dangerous precedent for if Goff gets in.

        • caochladh

          God almighty, surely, after all we have been through with PDB, the fair citizens of Auckland won’t elect another Labour Mayor…..will they?

          • Nige.

            by and lage… most people are thick.

        • Don W

          Career trougher Goff wants the Auckland mayoralty to carry on Lens lunacy.

    • mommadog

      I watch Prime as I tend to prefer it but apparently wrong choice tonight. He was there hanging out with all the one ones at the music festival ad saying something about his taste in music probably being a bit old.

      • caochladh

        Good on you taking that one for the team! At least we know he’s not MIA……….unfortunately.

  • Lord Evans

    TV one ran a story about a Mentoring scheme for young high school guys, interviews them, mainly Polynesians, Maoris, it looked very positive, and it hopes to expand. Lo and h

    • sandalwood789

      Sounds great! Good to see initiatives like that. I hope it succeeds and expands.

  • PC teachers making life complicated for kids introducing the trendy horizontal method of maths – factoring numbers in lines rather than the simple vertical method. No wonder kids are confused when even Psych 101 would teach that conceptual learning evolves from simple explanations. A teacher was quoted as saying that using the vertical method to add and subtract etc doesn’t give them the ability to recognize that 99 isn’t two 9s. Wot garbage. My grandson was really struggling with long division until I showed him how to do it by stacking answers under each other. “Wow,” he said, “that’s just so easy!”
    If only they wouldn’t expose our children to suspect experiments in learning and give them the chance to feel competent.

    • Huia

      I taught our grandsons to sound their words out and worked hard with them, they got it when they broke the words up as we used to do. Went ahead in leaps and bounds after that but they kept is secret from the teacher as they would have got a ‘growling’.

      • sandalwood789

        Yes, isn’t it crazy!

        I had a huge amount of respect for the late Doris Ferry on the Kapiti Coast (a retired teacher who taught children to read using the good old “phonics” method). She got *excellent* results too.

        Trust our so-called “Education Ministry” to still be using the long-since-discredited “whole language” method.

        • sarahmw

          Dr Maria Montessori started the logical way of teaching. She understood how children learned how to understand the basics. She also believed that structured learning was what children related to.

      • ShortBackwardSquare

        Yes, I spend a lot of time with my two youngest nieces teaching english and maths, well beyond the curriculum. They can certainly handle it. Using old school techniques as well which has blindsided the teachers a bit.

      • pisces8284 .

        Primary schools are now intoducing a ‘home room’ type of classroom with several teachers working in the same room. Apparently this was tried some years ago and was not successful. why do we not learn from our mistakes and why do they have to keep experimenting on our kids?

      • Odd Ball

        Our local school in OZ has just started going back to teaching phonics, previous to that they were using the ‘guess’ method. Apparently, you can only remember so many words, but if you know how to sound out each letter & then put it all together, you don’t have this limitation.
        For mathematics, they use a number line, for a few years, before been taught the vertical method.

    • caochladh

      Absolutely. If you can’t understand the basics, there is little hope of advancing.

      • willtin

        Exactly.
        Writing, Wreading and Writhmetic

    • Disinfectant

      Where is the Headmaster making sure his teachers are teaching it correctly.

      • Dave

        Marking off their attendance cards, and ensuring they are registered.

    • Dave

      Please, can you organize a few lessons for the following groups.

      1) 4 hour session for the Labour minister of Finance
      2) 12 hour session for Angry Andy
      3) 2 x 1 week sessions for t=the trustees of Maori treaty Settlements
      4) 2 x 1 day sessions for the administrators of Te Reo and Wananga committees.

      • Don W

        You can’t teach the unteachable.

    • Reaper

      For young children learning that method (stacking answers under each other) this song can be helpful.

      Warning: do not click on it unless you want it stuck in your head all week.

      • Dave_1924

        Sounds like the music from Stray Cat Strut……. Why would they ever go away from this method???

        • Reaper

          I have no idea. It has worked for generations hasn’t it?

    • Huia

      These experiments are very hard on the children and I cannot understand why they keep introducing new ‘methods’ of doing something. I remember our children were taught how to count with coloured rods, don’t think they lasted long did they?
      If it aint broke why try and fix it. I know we have to move with the times but I believe the basics should stay the same.

  • Nige.

    ex-JAFA answered last nights question with:

    “I don’t want to give the game away”

    What have you given away or had given to you?

    • caochladh

      You must give to receive. No one leaves our office without some sort of trinket.

    • Greg M

      A long time ago I gave some dropkick some free advice and a fat lip, does that count ?

      • willtin

        Did the free advice involve sex and travel?

      • caochladh

        I did the same (sisters boyfriend) – they don’t appreciate it.

    • Isherman

      Coolest thing I was lucky enough to be given was a 1958 Hofner 4550/s F-Hole acoustic guitar, genuine ebony bridge, mother of pear inlay and pick guard, pressed body in sunburst flame. A stunning guitar given to me by an elderly client when I was doing furniture removals. He was too frail to play and wanted to give it to someone who would appreciate it. Reasonably valuable, but I’ll never part with it.

      • Nige.

        …until you are the one too frail to play it.

    • Odd Ball

      We gave away lots of household stuff to the Salvation army, when we moved overseas.

      • willtin

        With the Sallies you can be reasonably sure that your contribution went to the people the Sallies help out.

    • greybeard

      I’ve just received one of the remembrance poppies that were planted around the Tower of London to commemorate the centenary of the start of the first world war. It was sent by my mother and arrived on the anniversary of my Fathers death. Somewhat emotional!

      • Isherman

        That was an amazing display, I know a lot of people that were interested in trying to get one.

        • greybeard

          Theres a nice connection in that my niece was one of those lucky enough to install them. They come in a really neat display box. I’m thinking i might see if the local RSA would like to display it for a bit so others can take a look. I don’t suppose theres too many in NZ!

          • jude

            are you able to post a photo here?

          • greybeard

            will try to but might not be tonight, still up doing the wages!

          • greybeard

            Hi Jude, would like to post pics to share with all, but I managed to upload only one, but have given up as apparently if they’re over 2mb it can’t be done.

          • greybeard

            Hi Jude, would like to post pics to share with all, but I managed to upload only one, but have given up as apparently if they’re over 2mb it can’t be done. sorry.

          • jude

            No worries . I am not a tech person ,there are Whale oilers who work on the help desk who are tech gurus if you need any help in future.
            I would have enjoyed seeing a photo .
            It is lovely that you have the memento and knowing your niece was part of the celebration with planting those commemorative poppies makes it very special indeed:)

          • greybeard

            I will have another go another time, probably been out in the sun too long today, fried my few remaining brain cells! Long hot day, tired, frustrated, why won’t it work RIGHT NOW when I need it to etc! lol.

          • jude

            I appreciate you trying :) Thank you !!

          • greybeard

            This is the pic of the box, exciting eh? The only one so far that would upload and the most uninspring. I will try again but may give up and go to bed.

          • Nige.

            [MOD] Just email [email protected] with your concerns. Please be polite and as precise as you can be. Remember: this is a volunteer service provided by other Whaleoil readers. Only contact them with commenting related problems.

            Go on. FREE HELP! you dont get that much more these days.

          • greybeard

            Thank you, have done.

          • jude

            I am sorry ,your pic did not come through. I see Nige has given an email…[email protected]
            I do appreciate you trying to share with us the commemorative poppy.
            There are a number of people on this blog that appreciate the history that our forebears were very much part of.

    • Carl

      I got given a STD which did not go down that well, I’m should take some blame receiving it by not protecting myself if you know what I mean.

    • Richard

      Gave away my virginity once, spent years looking for it, asked lots of girls if they had seen it…..eventually gave up looking and got married instead.

      • Don W

        Did the girls give you a helping hand to look for it.?

    • jude

      I think it was last year, I gave away the result of an All Black game on back chat.
      Some Whale oilers got a little cross because they were going to watch a replay the next day:)

      • Nige.

        tough for them. (i remember…. the replay had already been on free to air)

    • 1951

      I am always giving avoes and any other produce to my favourite people, never think anything of it. When I had a significant birthday I received the loveliest card from one of my kids mates saying he was able to bribe his way & receive free accommodation all the way to Chch, thanks to those bags of avoes.

    • Nic C

      A good mate won an auction at some corporate charity event one night. It included a ‘+1’… and the good b**tard asked me to come along; The prize?

      An entire day with the NZ SAS on their ‘live fire’ range in Hunua and at their Counter-Terrorism Training Facility, on base, at Ardmore Army Camp. Picked up at Machanics Bay early morning, full kit on.. blast out to Maraetai full tit on the boats, picked up and out to their ‘firing range’. Sniper rifles, high cal machine guns of every make, other cool mad weapons tried out. Down to the base.. close quarter weapons. Hosed off huge amounts lead with full auto MP5s, HK5s (fully suspressed, no kick… crazy!), Mini-HKs, pistols and other fully-auto hand guns I can’t recall the models of, gas-fed auto-load 12-guages… the lot. Plus a full ‘live fire’ demo of a hostage ‘take-down op… Won’t bore you with anymore, but needless to say, awesome, awesome, awesome.

      Oh yeah… half the AB’s squad came alone too!!

      I just can’t bring myself to tell my wife that our wedding day was only the 2nd best day of my life.

      • MaryLou

        Does she read Whaleoil??

        • Nic C

          No, thank god!! Had to get it off my chest though! Phew

          • MaryLou

            Really hope for your sake none of her friends do either!!!

            Edit – darned spelling again

          • I.M Bach

            What’s on offer to secure our silence?

          • Nic C

            Ha.. you lot here are actually quite evil aren’t you??!!

          • I.M Bach

            Just don’t go drawing any cartoons of us.

      • Nige.

        wooowah!

    • I.M Bach

      I’ve given so many people so much of my time over the years it’s not funny. Most I would never begrudge but when you stop doing certain things and so-called ‘mates’ stop calling or dropping by you have to wonder. I still do things for certain people but I must admit to being a tad selective.

      My eldest brother gave me two box-sets of Led Zep remasters. One set on disc and one on vinyl. The same man gave me a full set of linen and blankets for two single beds after I split with the wife, was on the bones of my butt and fighting for shared custody of my two daughters. He’s a good man and one who I would assist at any time.

    • Jafarma

      Having blended two families, moved from a large house to apartments where many appliances go with the place, and dealt with deceased parents and grandparents housing chattels, I’ve had heaps to give away.
      First stop was kids going flatting. First in first served, only one rule, once you take it, it never comes back.
      And all the rest (took up at least one lock up garage storage berth) all went to St Vincent de Paul. TradeMe not my scene, never disposed on one thing that way.

    • When I was 18 I helped out a lady and as a thank you she gave me a Womens Weekly cookbook. This was the beginning of my love for food, and cooking. I still have that book, its tattered and dirty but I treasure it.
      One of my oldest and dearest friends was really there for me when I needed it many years ago, and was an avid whistler of classical music – he gave me a gift of loving classical music.
      My maternal grandparents had an amazing garden and gave me a gift of loving gardening – a bit of an obsession actually:).
      When I went to OZ at 17 my father gave me a SLR camera, which opened up a whole new world for me.

  • Nige.

    possibly one of the best songs that i have heard about being lonely and in a bad place emotionally.

    Special message to those who are “down in a hole”…Hang in there, be as strong as you CAN be. No one expects perfect human beings and if they do then they arent human beings themselves. They are robots.

    • Richard

      This whole unplugged set was awesome, Nutshell is another favorite of mine from this.

  • intelligentes candida diva

    The behaviour at the Karaka horse sales is my style of crowd finesse.
    The beautiful looking colt ultimately led by Sir Parick Hogan, knew who was boss…having lead colts in front of groups of people, it requires strength and confidence to keep control.

    Good example that colt of “you cant fatten thoroughbreds” & Sir Patrick looked fine also.

    Positive piece of news

    http://i.stuff.co.nz/auckland/sport/65432357/Crowds-flock-to-Sir-Patrick-Hogan-and-Zabeel-show-at-National-Yearling-Sales

  • Gaynor

    I wonder how this trial will go, hopefully the doctor will be struck off.http://rt.com/uk/224239-uk-trial-genital-mutilation/

    • willtin

      As a male, I suggest he needs to suffer a similar consequence, of organ removal; then let’s see how keen he is on performing mutilating surgery!

    • Reaper

      Hopefully he goes to prison for the full 14 years!

  • jude

    • Moonroof

      No bones, pan-fried with tarragon. Now getting ovenation for a bit before plating.

      • jude

        That looks delicious:)

        • Moonroof

          Thank you, we’ll find out – the seasoning is experimental tonight ;)

          • Moonroof

            FYI, mostly worked. But be careful of cumin seed, it wants to take over. A tad less next time.

    • Lord Evans

      Or should that be ‘brainless’…

  • I.M Bach

    What was your first job? Mine was at Brixton’s Four Square in Miramar, Wellington. At age thirteen I bagged up potatoes and so on, then packed grocery orders before delivering them around the neighbourhood on a rather heavy, single-speed bicycle that had a small front wheel and a basket on the front. (No, the store wasn’t open all hours and don’t call me Granville.)

    • Dave_1924

      Feee…eeee…etch ya cloth IMB….

      • I.M Bach

        Well, you can go and get fa-fa-fa… fetchin’ it yasself.

        • Dave

          Which reminds me, as the “boy” in the workshop, I did the “pie run” on Saturday morning, and during the week when it was cold and wet, or the boss was hungry. Rain, hail, whatever, I just jumped on my bike and rode the Km or so and back. The order, an Oyster & Steak or a Potato top steak pie, and 2 fly cemeteries. I didn’t get a pie often, too expensive on the $12 wages a week as a first year apprentice.

          • Moonroof

            Don’t forget the lamingtons… The senior tech had to have one with T after the pie.. As for what happened if I got the pie order wrong…

    • Moonroof

      Digging cable trenches, and getting sent into small roof spaces to draw cables. And progress equalled becoming a formal trainee, cycling in rain to get milk for t’tea, never mind hoovering workshop and cleaining the bog every Friday.

      • I.M Bach

        Sounds like you got all the good jobs eh? I did progress to an apprenticeship and did similar, grotty and mundane chores. I feel your pain.

        • Moonroof

          As a young guy that thought he was better than he was, nowt I didn’t deserve at the time. How it’s worked out ~26 years later, dunno. My quals and industry are now mostly irrelevant.

          • I.M Bach

            Sadly my apprenticeship was to learn a dying art also; automotive machining. There isn’t anywhere near the call for it that there was when I took it up in ’73. Tired engine? Chuck it out. Even replacing a head gasket these days is more expensive that slipping in another motor and you’re likely to get one with a warranty that has done fewer k’s that the one you just blew up. While I did a lot of performance stuff there wouldn’t be enough to keep you going these days, you just change a chip in the computer.

          • Moonroof

            Same but different. Electronics, component level diag and repair, worked great when a TV or VCR was costing same as a good used car. Now, not so much. But I’d call you if the Opel had a bad engine day. Now I’m a glorified logistics monkey – customer has dead [insert appliance of choice]. OK, hello supplier, what can you swap them into? Customer wants remedy under CGA.

          • ex-JAFA

            I also have now-irrelevant skills picked up on a job I used to do. I could operate, service and maintain imagesetters (big laser-powered jobbies which burn images onto printer’s film) and developers (nasty motorised chemical baths to develop said film, which cost me most of my oesophagus). When customer demand meant we added it to the arsenal, I also drove an exposure frame (aka “sunbed”, a light brighter than the sun to burn developed film onto other materials).

            It was fun to work with dangerous lasers, sulphuric acid, cyanide and intensely-bright/-hot bulbs every day. Sadly this type of equipment just isn’t used any more – less than 20 years after I was doing it.

      • ex-JAFA

        Do you still have any of those cable drawings you drew?

    • Wasapilot

      When I was around 8, I started mowing lawns for people, mainly elderly, in the neighbourhood. Ended up with about 10 clients. Used Dads mower, petrol, oil etc so 100% profit

    • Greg M

      Working for the old man in school holidays brazing copper water pipes. I reckon a big chunk of the north shore was plumbed by a 14 year old while dad toddled down to the Thunderbird tavern for a few jugs.

      • I.M Bach

        Haha, the T-bird had jugs of all shapes and sizes, especially on a Thursday afternoon.

        • Greg M

          Yup. The first time I saw a flying jug…it was there. :-)

          • Moonroof

            Hmm.Palace Hotel Rotorua. all the furnishing were made of box section and stainless steel.

          • Aucky

            The Palace brings back great memories. I used to be a coach tour guide in my early days and the company I worked for ran weekend tours to Rotorua and stayed at the Palace Hotel. I well remember an American divorcee who taught me a thing or two at the Palace!

          • I.M Bach

            What subject?

          • Aucky

            As I recall it was an intensive practical session in enhancing Kiwi/US relations.

          • DrFix

            Where I live now we had a pub called “The Flying Jug”, well, locallly known under that name.

      • Dave

        Were you using sil-phos Greg? I loved that stuff, made brazing easy.

        • Greg M

          Yep certainly was. I also learnt how to divine water with a couple of bent sil-phos rods, don’t know how it works, but it does.

          • Dave

            Well, i cant divine, but we used Sil-phos for all electrical connections, amazing stuff. The melt point for solder was too low for our stuff. A few years ago, we were working at a clients who had a lot of alterations going on, a young plumber couldn’t join a pipe coming out of concrete, there was insufficient room for a compression joiner, and he couldn’t braze it. The old skills came back in a second, the young tradie was amazed an old bloke fixed something he couldn’t. I’m not that skilled, but it annoys the ……… out of me that these basic skills are almost lost. This guy was about to drive back to his workshop to get a kango hammer to break the concrete away!

        • I.M Bach

          Haven’t heard sil-phos mentioned for a long, long time. A bit like shellac.

          • Dave

            Heldite, Stag, Hemp and graphite paste……

          • I.M Bach

            Machinists blue was pretty funny on telephone ear pieces.
            Ed-sp.

      • Dave

        Next door to us was a machine shop, where they did repair aork and repairs. The lathes were still belt driven from a major overhead shaft. I recall every morning at 11 am, one of the machinists, would walk briskly out of the machine shop, straight to the Cossie Club. We were reliably told he would have a few jugs, then back to work to resume where he left off till knock off time 3.00 pm, then back to the Cossie pub. Oh, how times have changed – no overhead drive shafts, no going to the pub.

    • 1951

      Being of farming stock one never not had a job. From pre-school pouring the cup of tea for Dad & others, then onto feeding chooks to then move on up with helping to milk the house cows by hand. The one that would end up paying actual dosh and plenty, if one could cope was………………..oh dear, I’m not sure the townies would want to know….?

      • 1951

        Ok, you must have finished dinner by now…….the best money in the hand for a kid was plucking dead sheep. Out of a flock of around a thousand ewes there may have been as many as 60 lost during lambing back then. That was worth more than shillings & pence. Work hard enough and the Pounds would come.

        • Lux

          I remember staying on my aunts farm .. and similar stories ..
          I was a townie for about one day, until my best toweling jandles, they were all cool then.. got pooed on in the cow shed, and I thought it was funny, everyone welcomed us after that.

    • Lux

      All my sisters worked for my parents from when we could walk, my first job was sorting out nuts and bolts in a couple of jars when I was about 2 years old.
      We all got paid at the end of the week, and we could decide how we wanted to spend our earnings.
      My father employed some rather lovely guys and as we got older his place of work was where we all went after school ..

      • Dave

        Sounds like there was other things of interest at your dads business Lux!

        • Lux

          My fathers best friend had six sons, in their dream team they sort of hooked us up I think ..

          Well ..I was in lust with the young hunk across the way ..
          At Dads Factory ..

          One day, while lustfully looking at him, with a large drill in my hand, it got mixed up in my long hair .. in my lustful thoughts, I though turn it back on, it will unravel your long beautiful locks..

          EEEEEEEk no ..

          Dad was on the phone in his office, with his back turned to me, and I was screaming, the drill in my head ..

          Then out out no-where.. My darling saved my life ..

          .. Dad just about crapped him self when he turned around apparently ..

          • Dave

            Had pains in my stomach when i read that Lux. Well, up until the part about your darling! i know the pain of hair in rotating machinery. in my early 20’s, hair down past my shoulders, i was supposed to wear a hair net, but i was tough. I got a small section of hair caught in a pulley/belt, it ripped it straight out of my scalp, but it was the thud as my head hit the shelf above the motor that hurt, a fairly decent bruise for weeks and a weepy scalp for a few days. Never told anyone, just carried on, would be in too much trouble for not wearing the hair net.

          • Lux

            From a really young age Dad taught us how to hold tools and use them… so there was no excuse ..

            I was so in lust with that guy, my sisters still rark me up about it.
            Funny days.. even his name is unusual ..

    • DrFix

      My dad did a runner in 63, I was 8, sister was 6, youngest brother was 3. Mum had to get a job, worked in one of the 1st licensed restaurants in NZ, but it was evening/night work. We were fn poor. I got a job at a dairy/grocer doing the same as you. My deliveries were up to 3 miles away, same bike as yours. After that I delivered newspapers 6 afternoons a week plus 2 Saturday mornings out of 4 to collect the paper money.. I got one pound seven shillings a week, if I collected over 90% of what was on the books I got one pound ten the next week & was further up the queue to get my papers in the afternoon. I gave some to mum & kept some too. In 1966 I bought a 7 transistor radio, 39 pounds, 19 and 6 pence. Man, was I proud. After the newspapers I delivered milk, pint bottles of milk. I was picked up at 4am, helped load up at the milk treatment station, then run flat out pushing trolley with 8 crates of milk & stopping at every letterbox for about 6 miles, topping up the trolley from “dumps” along the way. Started off as week on/week off but soon convinced the boss that I could handle the other side of the run as well as my side after he had been through about 6 useless fella’s that either couldn’t get out of bed in time, or made a real hash of doing a good job. I did that for almost 4 years, gave up in School Cert year as I was drifting off to sleep some afternoons at school. SC lowest 765, highest 97%
      At almost 60 now, I have had almost 3 weeks “unemployed” since I was 9, 3 days “sick leave” & 2 weeks ACC for a work related injury/operation. And Labour wants to impose CGT on my estate? GGF

      • MaryLou

        Well said.

      • I.M Bach

        That’s an awesome tale DF, thanks for sharing. My old man had to leave school when his dad passed and worked like crazy to help his mum keep house. You do what you have to do eh? Good on ya.

      • DrFix

        Shortly after I got married, mid 70’s, when we used to have to do a manual tax return, there was a rebate allowed of 10 cents for every hour of overtime you worked. One year I did 1140 hours overtime, a rebate of $114.00. Can’t remember my hourly rate, but do remember that the wife grossed $17.00 a week as an apprentice florist.

    • Cadwallader

      My first full time job was as a curtain hanger in Timaru. My gross pay was $17pw of which 91c went in PAYE. I was happy to have a job.

      • I.M Bach

        I wish that tax rate could apply today!

      • Dave

        Fringe benefit tax on some of your jobs i hear?

    • Jafarma

      As 1951 says, farmers kids never not had a job. First job I can remember was as soon as I got off the primary school bus all I could see was the tractor and trailer parked up outside the house ready to take me out to feed out hay to the cattle and shift swede breaks for the sheep. I got to steer the tractor whilst Dad fed out the hay off the trailer after climbing to the top of he barn to toss he bales down. In the weekends and holidays depending on the season, it was pulling ragwort, chipping out thistles, plucking dead sheep, lambing ewes, stock mustering, docking etc etc etc etc…….
      First paid job though – either carting hay or a rousy in a shearing gang.

      • I.M Bach

        When I was a nipper my parents had a dairy, so all of us had jobs to do after school but we got pocket money. Farming isn’t an easy life I bet, but then it would have different rewards and I bet you’re loaded with life skills.

    • intelligentes candida diva

      12 years old going to work in the shearing sheds, then I got paid to clean the church

      • Cadwallader

        Which was dirtier?

        • intelligentes candida diva

          The sheep who belonged to farmers who didnt ‘dag’ their sheep before the shear.

    • TonyM

      Grubbing ragwort and thistles, and a million other farm jobs, I think I was probably 9 or 10. Then graduated to tomato picking and chicken poo (just for the mod) shovelling (the pay was good). Finally got a real job driving tractors at 17 for a contractor.

    • Quinton Hogg

      First job was in a garden shop in Dunedin. emptying old plant boxes and moving earth from one pile to another.
      Then a supermarlet filing shelves, and then on to a variety of jobs thru Uni, KFC, Laurenson a Dunedin bakery and bar work.
      Then on 11 feb 1985 started working as a lawyer.

    • Aucky

      Helping in a fish and chip shop. Had to turn up at 6.30am six days a week to clean the fryers then scale and fillet fish and then make gallons of batter. I think I was fourteen. Next year I went strawberry picking then worked on the roads for the local borough council (great money). When I went to Uni I joined the Territorials – best holiday job ever.

      • intelligentes candida diva

        I picked strawberries age 16, kept chatting so got put in a field on my own.

        • I.M Bach

          Does that mean you were outstanding in your field?

          • intelligentes candida diva

            Lol thats hilarious, yes probably for talking

    • WCMiner

      Pak ‘n’ Save when I was about 14 (about 1998 from memory). 2 hours before school Mon – Fri, for the princely sum of $5 / hour earning a cool $42 after tax a week.

    • Huia

      Pumping petrol for in my parents service station, started when I was 12years old. We had to do so many shifts a week then go home and get the vege’s ready for dinner.

      • Dave

        I didn’t start pouring petrol until I was in my mid twenties, worked in the industry servicing everything from tankers, to fuel stations, a second job three nights a week from 7 till midnight at one station (Caltex) and Sundays 5.00 pm to midnight at a Europa S/Stn. It was the only way to survive after we had kids, mortgage wasn’t going to pay itself!

        • Huia

          My parents were Caltex too, it was an automatic thing for us all part of being a family and all reaping the benefits.

  • caochladh

    I got my first after school job in Edinburgh when I was eight at the local grocery emporium which also had a bar at the back. I cleaned and set all the fireplaces, swept the floors, polished the brasses, restocked the shelves and ran errands.

    • Dave

      I was 11, almost 12, when I started working delivering just over 100 newspapers 6 days a week for the Manawatu Standard, like IMB, that added a lot of weight to the front of the bikewhich had a double banana crate for the papers, and a large box on the back. On days when there was a larger paper, I had to put the overflow in my tramping pack. At 13 I upgraded to working in an electrical workshop, and went on to complete an apprenticeship there, we worked so many hours, i completed a four year apprenticeship in under 3 years, and the apprenticeship board declined my certificates until the four years were up, another …… union influence. We specialized in electrical equipment repair, rebuilding motors, pumps and transformers and when the freezing works, or dairy company needed an urgent repair, you just kept working.

  • intelligentes candida diva

    Beautiful sky as sunsets down south

  • Herbert Charles

    Ratty old Harley Verses CBR1000

    • I.M Bach

      I took out my original message, watch the clip.
      Edit; didn’t want to spoil it.

  • Quinton Hogg

    watching a clash of culture, in more ways than one.
    south Korea vs Iraq in the Asian Cup semi final.
    SK leading too. 1-0

    • Edward_L

      In South Korea, no one executes 13 boys for watching the Asian Cup footie. Both countries have to put up with nutters

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