Whaleoil Backchat

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  • George

    The leaders have had their say. JK has been universally heralded as having the most effective presention.
    Andrew Little cannot compete, he does not have the skill set, personality nor the intellectual support. His party is barren of policy and his political history is littered with rejection and all this was evident before he was elected Labour leader. Are we now seeing another cycle of leadership anxiety disorder? And will it inevitably end in tears? RIP – Goff, Shearer, Cunliffe and ……….?

    • willtin

      To be fair, they will give each of the entire Party a turn.

    • 1951

      Now is the time for ACT to step into the void. We need less govt., more individual responsibility and to get that, we need to re-educate those that depend on our taxes to survive…..change the mind-set. Good time to push it.

      • Don W

        Do you think there is enough libertarians in Act to do what you suggest.?There needs to be a revolution of the mind that rejects this socialist dogma.

        • 1951

          Probably not at the moment but it wouldn’t take much to get those who have woken up to the ‘Leftist’ BS to swing in the totally opposite direction. Once they appreciate they can actually have control over their own destination there would be no-stoppin`- em. It takes communication.

          • Don W

            The libs tried to get their message across for more than 20 years , ended up winding last year.I sometimes think that voters want gov,t to be like a Santa clause and doting parents all at the same time, lots of free gifts, lots of mollycoddling. Haven’t the people in Greece done just done that.?

          • cows4me

            Democracy usually leads to socialism Don, people will always vote to spend someone else’s money and the more of someone else’s money on offer, well you know the rest. People remind me of cows, the paddock next door is always greener and screw tomorrow.

          • Don W

            Democracy does lead to socialism which then leads to serfdom and gov’ts treat us like a herd of cows to be milked , sheep to be fleeced for their benefit not ours not ours. Gov’ts, Councils have a share holding in our lives, they own us.

          • 1951

            All the more reason for ACT to leap into the void Labour & the Hard Socialists Greens are leaving.

          • Don W

            What is holding them back ,I wonder.?

          • Don W

            Do they understand the meaning of individual freedom, the ownership of ones life, the right to pursue ones hopes and dreams and the non initiation of force principle by people against other people.?

          • 1951

            Look how the ‘Green’ thinking got a lashing from the public in the ‘Eleanor Catton Remarks’ over the last 48 hours. Huge backlash.

      • Odd Ball

        ACT have several problems
        -A hostile media
        -A reputation for lack of integrity (think of John Banks, David Garrett etc)
        -A lack of a Charismatic leader, who can get the message across despite the problems I’ve pointed out above
        -It’s hard to sell self responsibility, when other parties effectively bribe you with your own money

        • cows4me

          Poor old Banks is getting the boot put into him. Why don’t they just tie him to the low tide pole and let the tide come in and out, if he’s still alive after that he’s defiantly a witch and we’ll need another trial.

          • LabTested

            Or just see if he weighs the same as a duck

          • cows4me

            This should be played buy Bank’s lawyers in front of the so called leaner-ed ones.

        • 1951

          It is not unsurmountable. National got in despite a hostile media, yup? Seymore showing his face on every campus would probably go a long way in swaying those kids capable of ‘thinking’. Those that depend on benefits are already getting the message thanks to Paula’s legacy.

    • cows4me

      Why don’t some of the lefty intellectuals, you know the ones, the ones that keep telling us the error of our ways. The ones that write for the media, why don’t they put their names in the ring, after all they have all the answers.

      • pisces8284 .

        The ones that are IN the media you mean right?

        • cows4me

          Yeah I’m think people like Trots, Commie Dan, Paddy Pants Wetter and associates.

      • 1951

        (pssst! whisper…’cos those Lefties that write for the media have mastitis on both frontal lobes). Just sayin`

        • cows4me

          You’re probably right 1951. They always know what’s wrong and dish out the advice, you would think they would like to up their pay scales.

        • Don W

          Do you think that you have spelt the word Mastitis correctly. We know what they spend a lot of time doing with their frontal lobes. ;)

          • 1951

            Mastitis like many other bacterial inflammations has a upwardly moving habit. What else could cause such an aggressive deterioration of brain tissue found only in a Leftie’s skull?

          • Don W

            I wasn’t referring to their brain when using the term frontal lobe . A similar word to mastitis sums them up if you get my meaning.

      • willtin

        Thanks cows’. You just inspired my Word for the day. lefty INEFFECTUAL

      • Orange

        Maybe their jobs in the MoE pay too much for them to want to move.

  • willtin

    In today’s market, is it better to invest in rental housing or commercial property? I’m looking at both from the perspective of a minnow.

    • chrisgale

      Cash will be king, unless we hyperinflate.

      • willtin

        Cash scares me; with the ability of a bank failure to enable a ‘haircut’.

        • STAG

          Stay out of the housing market, buy shares in Ryman Healthcare and the like, ageing population, great returns

    • pisces8284 .

      I would say rental housing. People always have to have a place to live, it’s too expensive mostly for them to buy. Businesses? well meh. I have been trying to sell a studio apartment in Mount Maunganui for years. In the meantime, it’s costing me.

    • jonno1

      FWIW we’ve been selling down commercial (office, not retail) and purchasing residential property, also repositioning the residential more upmarket. Commercial has a higher yield but lower capital growth, which is a trade-off. Its also very sensitive to area trends, so vacancy rates can be a problem. Oh, and bigger is better for commercial (better tenants generally) so you may need to partner up. Overall, avoid debt as much as possible as that’s the killer.

      Although residential yields are abysmal, as Pisces says people need somewhere to live. Our latest purchase is a high-end apartment, which is a bit of a punt. We’ve installed new white-ware, Sky and UFB, but it remains to be seen whether it will pay off! I am a bit nervous about the outgoings (body corp) so Pisces’ other comment doesn’t help…

      Short version: it all comes down to your risk profile.

      • pisces8284 .

        You are right to be nervous about body corp, there is always something to spend your income on. As long as the building doesn’t have leaky home you will be OK. I have heard of nightmare scenarios at the Mount, apartment buildings being wrapped for up to a year, and apartment owners having to pay 300K towards repairs

        • jonno1

          No leaks, we’ve been monitoring this building for a while and that’s all good. These particular apartments seldom come on the market so we had to pay a bit of a premium (from our perspective). The vendor wasn’t happy either so maybe we got it about right!

      • pisces8284 .

        On the other hand, my son who lives overseas owns a few rental properties in NZ. Tenants have paid 23K off his mortgage over the past seven or so years. Go figure. NZ will always need rental accommodation so I don’t know why landlords are given such a bad rap, and why they try to manipulate the economy to stop people buying houses to rent

    • caochladh

      There seems to be an abundance of commercial property for lease on the market at the moment, so it may not be the right time to invest in that if you need return.

  • ShortBackwardSquare

    When standup comedy goes wrong – Lee Mack tells Graham Norton, John Cleese and Martin Clunes his story. One of my favourite clips.

    • pak

      Lee Mack is a very funny and entertaining guy.

  • Captain Darling

    Lookalikes. Ones a puppet the others a muppet, can you tell which is which?

    • Carl

      The one on the left is a union puppet.

    • Isherman

      I have to wonder if there’s any deliberate symbolism in the red tie on the smarter looking one on the right though.

  • Nige.

    Johcar last night’s question with:

    “because my scoutmaster told me to”

    What is you’re a best memory from scouts, girl guides, boys club, youth group, sunday school etc?

    • willtin

      Aged 8 or so, walking home in the twilight of a tropical evening from one of my first and very few Cub visits, in Terendak Camp in the 60’s. Big brother just passed me for a campfire starting badge, and we all sang The Quarter Master’s Store, loudly.

      • Takes me back. Around that time I was serving with the 1st Green Jackets Brigade in Penang. Found all sorts of excuses to go to Malacca as the Aussies who were based there had the most amazing food. I still remember breakfast in the mess – full cooked breakfast including steak dripping in butter and garlic. Most of time at Terendak when not eating was running up huge Mess Bills for Aussie beer. Don’t think I got a badge though!

    • Sally

      Tramping with the Rangers and Venturers. Probably the best one was climbing Mt Hikurangi to see the sunrise.

      • Bruno 32

        Spent 5 days in the winter of 1975 based in the Hut trapping possums .Only person there and the sunrise thing was not an issue. Rastas changed the dynamics not long after..A great mountain.

        • Sally

          Climbed it 1971. The tramping huts prepared me for life in dealing with dodgy toilet facilities.

    • KGB

      Cooking eggs in orange skins on a camp-fire and telling ghost stories in our tents.

    • TonyM

      Rescuing a fellow boys brigader on mt taranaki who had hypothermia so bad we had to carry him for hrs (what a mission). Even got a nice certificate for that effort somewhere.

      • TonyM

        And kayaking the length of Lake Patea and camping for the night on the way :-)

    • Don W

      Being camped in Lietches clearing where we opened up track through bush , following old survey lines, which came out close to the coast.

    • jonno1

      Perhaps not “best”, but memorable – getting lost in a snowstorm on Mt Holdsworth in the 60s. Finally got back to the hut. Next morning realised we had been walking along a ridge with a sheer drop to one side.

    • DangerousE

      Cubs, Around late 80s we were due to go to the shooting range. The day before this expert turns up at cubs with his rifle to give a demonstration and explain what to expect. This expert marksman (i can’t remember who) has a big hunting rifle with scope, probably a 303 or something similarly big with a scope. The cub master asks for a volunteer, everyone’s hand goes up, the rifle owner states it must be a left hander as his rifle is left handed. My hand is the only one still in the air. I get to hold the rifle and be taught how to hold it correctly and how to aim properly. A young boys dream come true. I’m thinking I can’t wait to get to the range the next evening. That night life would deal me a cruel blow, I started vomiting non stop, and by the morning I was admitted to hospital with pneumonia, where I would spend the rest of the week. All I could think of was missing the rifle range and not getting to fire that rifle. Only consulation I had was the previous night getting to hold it and pretend to aim and fire.

    • SlightlyStrange

      As a ranger, doing the Abel Tasman. One of my first “taking responsibility for myself” trips away from home. It was awesome, and hard at the same time.
      As a leader, sitting behind the girls tents at night, listening to them planning how to hide the girls that were in their tent who shouldn’t be, in case we came to check on them. Hilarious :)

    • hookerphil

      At age 12 being sent off on a good old bike of the times from Riccarton to Waipara, a distance each way of over 60 km, on a hot Saturday for a Boys Brigade biking badge with one other person. I have no idea how far we went, all I can remember we were going all day and didn’t arrive back until well in the evening. I know I was absolutely stuffed, the other boy told me to be quiet and let him tell them that we did the whole distance cause he had been through Amberley once before. Thanks Jumbo. Personally I never had and would doubt I had ever biked more than about 5 km in one go before.
      In retrospect I think that was fairly appalling leadership by the Boys Brigade, I am right against all the namby pamby of the current days but this was all no care, no responsibility. I cannot even recall I received the damm badge or not.

    • Dave

      Attending the 1972 Scout Jamboree at Pukekhoe, remember two things well, the prize was the Jamboree flag flying outside the main entrance. Many scouts had tried to get it, but all had failed, the flagpole was too high to scale. A member of our team who will remain nameless realized the pole was bolted between 2 posts driven deep into the ground, they borrowed a spanner, and early one morning instead of scaling the pole, removed the bottom bolt, swung the pole down, took the flag and put the pole back in place all within a few minutes. They returned the flag a few hours later.

      We also watched the 1972 Grand Prix, and i remember a major accident on the back straight, a car going off the track and ending up on or close to the railway lines. That gave me my love of Motor sports, and i have followed it since. Attached a great article about Dennis the Menace.

      Loved my time in scouts!

      http://static1.squarespace.com/static/52743283e4b0144957d1e26b/t/534b8919e4b03c03e07a53fe/1397459225997/DENNIS+Part+3+.pdf

      http://www.sergent.com.au/motor/tas72p.html

      PS: Note the price of Postage in 1972. Horrifically expensive, but the best thing, no ability to phone home and no internet meant everyone entertained themselves, outdoor activities kept us very active and fit.

      • Don W

        My older brother was a mechanic in Papakura about that time . One of his employers raced the PDL mustang, the other raced the Fiat 125 T.

        • Dave

          I owned a 125T, was a great car, the handling was outstanding. I remember the PDL Mustang well, Leo Leonard was a hero of mine in those days, he ran Leo Leonard motors in Timaru, now selling trucks based in Washdyke.

          And of course we joked the PDL stood for Paraparaumu’s Dirty Laundry, whereas it was a truly successful and very innovative kiwi business founded by Sir Robertson Stewart.

          • Don W

            My brother worked for Paul Fahey and Ralf Empson. I got to sit in the PDL Mustang.

          • Don W

            Fiat sold their 125 to Russia and they produced it as their Lada from about 1972 until about 2 years ago basically unchanged . You have to love the progress of socialism.

    • caochladh

      With 92BB, Belfast, spent two weeks in Denmark with the FDF.

  • Sally

    Earlier today I posted a comment that Clayton Cosgrove is the only Labour MP who claims to had small business experience on his Labour profile.

    I decided to do a search to find out what was that business and how successful it was.

    Apart from an obscure reference to a communication business I haven’t found anything else. Does anyone know?

    As he hasn’t boasted about it on any profiles apart from saying small business owner, I would say he was unsuccessful.

    So Labour’s small business experience – very little.

    • Cowgirl

      Didn’t David Parker once run a small business (into the ground)?

      • geoff2112

        Yep

      • willtin

        There you are then – well grounded.

      • Carl

        Any luck with a job?

        • Cowgirl

          Working on it – the one I thought I might get isn’t available at present, do will look at other options in the coming days. I think I would like to try something a bit different. The one I was looking at was pretty much what I was doing 6 years ago. It didn’t excite.

      • cows4me

        Parker would struggle to run a bath.

        • Don W

          Parker is a career civil serpent with forked tongue.

        • Dave

          His first budget and his CGT was a runaway success, for National. He never speaks of it now.

          • cows4me

            It amazes me how someone like Parker believes he has the brains to run a budget for NZ. He’s either got a very large ego or nuts the size of watermelons to think he could handle a job like that. He would be a disaster.

          • Don W

            He wouldn’t be able to run the dog tucker account. The dogs would starve.

          • Dave

            I don’t think he has either, just a “she’ll be right attitude” and the knowledge he wont be in finance for long, and it will be someones else’s problem. Then also the fact, its all good, its someone else’s money he will be spending / wasting / loosing.

        • Carl

          You might be right but he sounds good at running one up a mates wife.

          • Don W

            That seems to be a lefty trait. L Brown syndrome. They cant be trusted.

      • Sally

        Managing and litigation partner in South Island law firm Anderson Lloyd. Does that count as a small business owner?

        • Cowgirl

          I thought he bungled a cafe start-up too amongst his other achievements. I’m sure I read that here a while back.

          • Sally

            Well, will put him down as a failure in the business world.

            Doesn’t leave one with much confidence for Labour in the business world. So won’t bank on them to be much help for the small business owner.

    • caochladh

      He has a MBA, so in my book that disqualifies him from running a successful SME. Allegedly his business provided strategic advice to companies regarding government, corporate affairs, communication and public relations.

      • Dave

        I admire anyone with an MBA, its a hell of a lot of very hard work! however, there are always a few academic types who slip through, plenty of theory, but no idea.

        • caochladh

          I have seen many recipients of a MBA come and go. In the main, they lacked people skills and to them, everything was a “text book case”. Well, its not like that in the real world and good business is built on good relationships with good people and text books can’t teach you that.

          • Dave

            Try the EMBA, the Exec course is only open to those over 30, who have many years actual business experience in the real world. A huge and distinct difference. Average age is around 38 from memory.

          • caochladh

            One of my colleagues (aged 60 at the time) decided to complete a MBA just for the hell of it. Being ex SAS and SIS he was always up for a challenge. He did get capped before he retired.

  • pisces8284 .
  • LabTested

    I read an article on Stuff today saying that last year jobs advertised on Seek were way up across all regions. Applications were up. Average pay was up (as much as 16% in one sector). But when I went back to Stuff, the article has disappeared & I can not find it. Did anyone else see this?

  • idbkiwi

    Not bad for tall-poppy-eating, shallow-thinking, lil’ole NZ.

    2015 Index of Economic Freedom
    (From the Heritage Foundation and The Wall St Journal)

    http://www.heritage.org/index/

    Edit: spelling.

    • pak

      Not bad at all! The definition of economic freedom (and how they measure it) on this site is interesting – “The fundamental right of every human to control his/her own labour and property” etc – pretty much the antithesis of what Labour/Greens seem to want for us. Doubt we would rank third if that lot in charge.

  • ShortBackwardSquare

    And what week would be complete without ‘Russian Tractor Racing’?

  • Yeahright

    So if a Chinese person buys land, Winston is onto it, all over the news, selling out our birth right. Americans buy our land for the 3 out of 4 years, hardly a whisper. Nah, Lefties aren’t racist!!

    • Second time around

      In the last 5 years the Chinese have bought only 6% of the total land sold, the Americans 26%, the British 11% and the Israelis 8%. Still, we should have sold the Crafar farms at a discount to Fay Richwhite and assorted iwi.

  • caochladh

    We need these sort of signs on our main arterial routes………..

  • cows4me

    I hear the interest rates are looking like they may drop, all you Aucklanders will be in like robbers dogs I would assume. All that cheap money, all those lovely houses.

    • McGrath

      They won’t drop them as that will run risk of inflating Auckland house prices further.

      • cows4me

        What about us poor farmers paying exorbitant rates just because you guys keep buying houses, where’s the justice :-)

    • Phill

      cue David Parker having a fit about the fastest rising interest rates in the developed world holding people back. Mis-management of the economy by JK. Its an outrage!
      Oh wait…..hang on….

    • Cowgirl

      I hope not – I just fixed my mortgage last month for a year dagnabbit!

      • I.M Bach

        Ditto. Now, where’s that Murphy bloke? I want a word.

        • rantykiwi

          I’m glad I let mine revert to floating for a while – for once apathy and laziness has resulted in a good outcome.

      • Platinum Fox

        Why would you put it all in a single maturity?

        • Cowgirl

          Long story, but I don’t think I can split it.

  • jude

    When extended warranties first came out, i did buy them. Mainly for laptops and dishdrawers.
    I have never needed to use them , so do not continue to buy them.
    Attached from Facebook is relating to Australia but I am sure it probably applies here.

    Worth a read…http://www.news.com.au/finance/money/just-throwing-cash-away-consumers-warned-off-extended-warranties-following-court-decision/story-fnagkbpv-1227200617935

    • Margaret McCall

      I did buy one for a laptop and afer trying to get it fixed several times, I finally got a new laptop. The only time I bought one and have never needed it again.

    • pisces8284 .

      Consumer don’t recommend buying them

      • jude

        I always get asked at Fisher and Pykel, Harvey Norman and Dick Smith.
        I guess enough people buy them for those companies to keep offering.
        I do not bother because I have never needed to use one.
        I still have extensive house and contents insurance but that is different.
        We have some protection as consumers that should cover if shoddy materials or workmanship are at fault.

        • pisces8284 .

          The guy at Harvey Norman was quite assertive, Even put on the invoice that we had been offered it and declined

          • jude

            Ditto, am thinking there may be an incentive scheme around them selling the extended warranty ie a bonus??

          • stephen2d

            Of course there is and it’s pure cash for them. Tell to stick it on their desk and that you are protected anyway, even if out of legal warranty by a small amount of time.

          • pisces8284 .

            Absolutely

          • pak

            I have also found Harvey Norman are very pushy in this area so maybe they get some sort of commission if the gullible consumer buys – see you have had same thought Jude as I was typing!

          • cows4me

            They have to push extended warranties, it’s money for jam. Usually if the thing claps out it’s cheaper to buy a new one but most things a pretty reliable anyway.

          • Jafarma

            He’s probably got sales targets that he hasn’t met

        • Dave

          Main thing to have is “fusion cover” covers for a surge or lightening or similar blowing an appliance, but be careful, a client had fusion cover, he then discovered he had a $1000 excess, replacement was $1200……. oops.

          • jude

            I chance my luck with one of those plugs that supposedly protect against surges:)
            The cost of some of these appliances are ridiculously low. A flat screen tv for ?300 and laptops etc are dropping in price too.
            As someone mentioned ,it is often cheaper to replace.
            I have found that cordless phones are cheaper to replace than buy a new battery for! I find that bizarre but there you are.
            Nothing wrong with the phone at all.

          • Disinfectant

            Bit like buying a set of cartridges for your printer.

          • jude

            That is true too! I have not bought new printers but the warehouse had some for something like $60.
            I think we must be heading towards a society where we don’t print we just wave our electronic devices at bar code machines or email online.,etc

          • Moonroof

            “surge protectors” mostly a waste of time and $$, if a car hits a pole up the street and 11kV lines land on supply line to your home, nothing will save whatever is plugged in. Lightning strike, same. From some experience, quite unusual to check out an appliance that has died of “power surge” when nothing else in the house did. Usually a legit random fault of the appliance itself.

          • Greg M

            Totally agree. I run my TV / stereo as well as my computers on UPS boxes. They aren’t going to offer any more protection, but do allow me to shut things down properly if there’s a power cut.
            When I build my next and final house, I’m probably going to have a few power sockets running on a line conditioner to smooth things out a bit.

          • Moonroof

            Yup, I use a constant voltage conditioner on the hifi gear (the vacuum tubes like it that way), rest of house can take its chances – a stray rear drive Nissan hitting the pole outside would replace 30yo fridge…

          • jude

            Ok You and Greg might as well be talking in Chinese! I have no idea so for me as a lay person….i will guess just unplug at night. But if you have a surge when you are watching….

          • Moonroof

            OK. Simplified version. Forget “surge protectors”, unplug important stuff like lappie for accessing WoBH when not in use. Done. Rest of electrical stuff is toast if something bad happens, keep your contents insurance :)

          • I.M Bach

            They just don’t make appliances to last these days do they? I mean 30yrs is nothing! I’d be talking to a lawyer ;)

        • ex-JAFA

          A certain global tech vendor used to insist on retailers selling a certain number of extended warranties before they’d qualify for the marketing rebate on the product sales themselves. They couldn’t get their heads around the Consumer Guarantees Act making extended warranties redundant.

      • TonyM

        You are very well protected by NZ law

    • pak

      I also bought one for a computer years ago, never used, and like you, never did again. We are pretty well protected in N.Z. with the Consumer Guarantees Act.

    • Dave

      Most appliances and electrical / electronics equipment will fail within the first few hours use if it is going to fail. Warranty after that is more to cover unforseen issues (mechanical) etc. However, we did take an extended warranty on our car, after almost 5 years its still going strong, so it was of no value.

      • I.M Bach

        Most modern cars are pretty good really, the days of being stuck on the side of the road with a dead Austin Allegro are behind us.

        • MaryLou

          I’d still get one on used cars, even from a dealer. Might be going fine at the time, but who knows what the last owner was like? Particularly Euros which are expensive to fix, or anything with a CVT gearbox. Most people don’t bother servicing them, and if it goes wrong, it can cost HEAPS!

          • Dave

            Not all euros are hard or expensive to fix, we are on to 5th VW next week, no issues whatsoever and the service vehicle clocked up almost 200,000 km. Trick with the Euros is to check the service history.

          • MaryLou

            Maybe I’ve just had a bad run with Euros, but would never buy one now. I would if I was buying new, but then I’d never buy new because it seems like the most colossal waste of money (the Scottish side coming out). 200,00k is fine if you’ve had it all that time, but imagine taking on someone elses’ 200,000k vehicle – the risk would be immense! Even 120,000k of someone elses driving would worry me…

          • Greg M

            Servicing is the key point. Any modern car with a full and regular service history should be good for at least 400 kms, a diesel double that.

          • rantykiwi

            Most of the current crop of high-revving, highly turbocharged small diesels are unlikely to make the 400k mark.

          • I.M Bach

            You make some valid points. After 30 yrs in the motor trade I came out the other side a Toyota fan for the most part, but the wife drives a Commodore and it’s been brilliant.

          • Moonroof

            Have had 11 years out of what is now aging Eurotrash, big ks, mostly reliable (after replacing 90% of cooling system), next one will likely be a Mazda (so long as it’s a manual).

          • rantykiwi

            I drove the first SP22 Mazda 3 in the coiuntry a few months ago – maunal, diseasel and a good car. I’d buy one if the bloodsucking leeches would drop the cost of RUCs.

          • I.M Bach

            One of my (many) nephews drives a diesel Skoda and apart from being a nice ride it’s really got some torque! Wellington’s hills are easily flattened in that thing, I was impressed. Roomy too.

          • MaryLou

            Oooh… but it’s still a Skoda. A Skoda…. no, I don’t think I could do it!

          • I.M Bach

            Aha! I didn’t think so either but I have to say I was swayed. Really nice car (he said wincing).

          • I.M Bach

            I think it’s one like this from memory.

          • MaryLou

            Oh! That looks remarkably good, and…. un-boxy.

            Maybe I should try to lose old prejudices

          • ex-JAFA

            My VW Polo is just a rebadged Skoda. Cheaper and fractionally smaller than a Golf, it beats the Golf in virtually every department.

          • Greg M

            I’m thinking about ditching the Rangie and going for the new 320D Beemer, it ticks a lot of boxes for me.

          • MaryLou

            Yep – So many really good Japanese cars now, to suit most tastes, from basic to truly luxurious. And fast, if that’s your thing. I think your wife’s on the right track though – love those Holdens :). And with them shutting up shop in Australia may become a collectors item? I think even if they keep the brand, Holdens made outside Australia use Opel motors?

          • I.M Bach

            And the steering columns, ask anyone who has hit the wipers negotiating a roundabout.

          • rantykiwi

            I used to work in a job where we had a fleet of Scanias and Mitsubishis – changing truck mid-shift often led to interesting indication at the first turning.

          • I.M Bach

            Mmmm, Scania V8’s, way cool. Two mates of mine (brothers) set up a linehaul company in NZ, they used Scanias quite a bit and got some big k’s out of them.

          • rantykiwi

            We sometimes used to bobtail a couple of V8 Scanias along to the Friday night V8 cruise through the Auckland CBD – mostly because it annoyed the bogan brigade to find a bigger V8 than they had in their crappy old VK Commodore.

    • Moonroof

      Waste of $$, the CGA does 99% of that. Witnessed on a daily basis ;)

  • Isherman

    I know its a dead rubber game, but 42/3 after 12 chasing 288?, looks like its going to up to Williamson, Elliot and Ronchi to try and dig us of this mess. sigh.

    • Aucky

      Another first ball duck from Guptill.

      • Skydog

        Can Guptill be replaced for the world cup or is it too late? I would have loved to have seen Ryder open.

        • Bobb

          You will never see Ryder play for NZ again.

      • Isherman

        yeah, you’ll forgive me for not being comfortable upvoting that comment, lol.

      • Jafarma

        Williamson may as well open given he virtually ends up in that position any way in the first over

  • nellie

    I see in the local rag that the mayor and his council friends are counting (and encouraging) comments on twitter and facebook as part of the 10 year plan submission process. What a joke.

    • pisces8284 .

      Hmm I don’t know that it is such a joke. Any feedback is good, whatever form it comes in

      • nellie

        The problem I have is the lack of ‘control’ of those 2 sources of submissions. The ability to overly represent without any credibility could completely undermine the process – and thus the outcome. I can just imagine the mayor heralding the overwhelming support for the CRL because a large number of anonymous FB & twitter trolls.

        • Cowgirl

          Social media is infested with rabid lefties – Len will love it. In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if that’s why it has been suggested.

        • pisces8284 .

          FB isn’t anonymous and people on there are not necessarily trolls (well I’m not anyway). Why do you only want ‘controlled’ submissions? People are far more likely to say what they think if there are no obstacles in their way – and isn’t that what you really want? If not, that’s a whole different argument

  • Dave

    Perhaps a Birthday present for the Wo’er who has most things……

    Bacon maple doughnuts are risky enough on their own.

    But how do they taste when merged with beer in a bottle? Oregon brewer Rogue teamed up with pastry outlet Voodoo Doughnuts to make something truly special.
    The weird blend of flavours includes such ingredients as smoked hickory malt and bacon to make a brew that really reminds you of, well, bacon and maple and beer.

    http://buy.rogue.com/rogue-voodoo-doughnut-bacon-maple-ale/

  • kiwirog

    Hager’s favourite book shop, Unity, floods today due to a sprinkler on the floor above and not an ounce of schadenfreude from Cam. Police are believed to be looking for a good looking swarthy man in a dressing gown last seen running up Willis street with a pipe wrench.

    • Reaper

      I’m gutted I didn’t have my phone with me at the animal shelter this morning. We spread old newspapers out underneath the cats’ food & water dishes. A cat had vomited right on that picture of Hager holding up his book. It would have made a great photo.

      • Moonroof

        Smart cat, good on you with your work, hope kitty finds a home.

  • Richard

    Do we have any Lee Enfield enthusiasts out there?

    I have just come into the care of an 1896 model and am interested in knowing the provenance.

    • Don W

      Is it in original condition./

      • Richard

        Don’t think so, looks to me like the wood has been altered.
        The barrel and receiver serials don’t match either.

        • Don W

          I am no expert on Lee enfields but I do have a soft spot for them. They served the British and Commonwealth troops well . They may be still making them in India but not sure on that. The internet or other gun collectors may have the knowledge you are looking for.

        • Isherman

          Well its definately a Birmingham Small Arms manufactured version, there’s a start.

        • Aucky

          That VR emblem brings back memories of happy school days back in the 60s. The army cadets mainly had access to WW1 Lee Enfield 303s but they were way to big for the third formers who were issued with much smaller Boer War carbines which bore that VR & crown insignia. I wonder what happened to them?

          • Don W

            Weren’t they 22 calibre . My older brothers went cadets.

          • Aucky

            No. 303. I believe they were used by the cavalry.

          • Don W

            The ones they used at our college and they were full wooded but were 22 calibre

          • Richard

            Yes, this one has a shorter barrel length than most from what I have seen and read.
            Just read a publication on the NZ issue Lee Enfield Carbine (LEC88 NZ) but am still none the wiser as to the provenance of this one.

        • Isherman

          OK, so the bottom pic shows the broad arrow acceptance mark, of what I believe to be a BSA manufactured version made originally for the Canadian forces, and then sold to NZ in about 1914, Im pretty sure the C14 is a Canadian mark. I cant find out how many were procured exactly, but it appears this was #2679 of how ever many, and is then stamped with the said NZ acceptance mark.

          • EveryWhichWayButLeft

            C14 denotes rifles that were purchased from Canada by NZ in 1914.

        • M C Chinaman

          Interesting to see the 1836 mark with the VR (Queen Victoria) mark- given that Victoria became queen in 1837.

          • EveryWhichWayButLeft

            The VR and crest is Victoria Regina which I think was stamped on all English made service rifles.

          • M C Chinaman

            But surely not before she was queen. William IV was monarch that year.

          • EveryWhichWayButLeft

            You might have missed my edit (needs a page refresh), but Isherman has pointed it out too… it says 1896 if you look close – Vic was Queen until 1901.

          • M C Chinaman

            I stand corrected

          • Isherman

            If you refer to the date stamp, a closer look will show it as 1896.

    • Isherman

      Is it marked with anything on the top flat of the butt plate?, for example a mark like 88. V.F

      • Richard

        It has that 88 stamp on top of the sights.
        Just at the bottom right of the sight there.

        • Isherman

          That denotes the bayonet pattern fixture, in this case the 1888 pattern bayonet.

        • EveryWhichWayButLeft

          EFD is the Royal Small Arms Factory Enfield Lock and the 28 is likely to be the inspectors mark.
          As pointed out by Isherman below, the broad arrow is acceptance into service, so I would say the sight has come from another rifle (not uncommon, in fact it’s more the norm).

          Not sure what the /88 FC is though. The only reference to FC that I know is RFC for Royal Flying Corps – but I don’t think it would be just Flying Corps

    • waldopepper

      no expert but i know a bit. barrel and receivers serial numbers not matching is common, simply because these were made to fight a war, and not intended as collectors items down the track. so if one was damaged in combat parts of another could be substituted, the rifle repaired, and youd be back shooting at the enemy in no time. also when they came back to the armoury the principal was the same, use whatever parts we have and make the thing functional again and get back out there. all that said, it now means that if you have one with all the numbers matching, it has more value. but you need receiver, barrel, heel and collar (and bayonet if they had them on that model) all matching. which is hard to find. also, a lot of these older guns were sporterized in recent years, to take scopes etc. this was due to the action being so smooth and enjoyable to shoot, as well as the overall reliability of the rifle itself, that they were a cheap and easy big bore rifle. so check for holes drilled in the metal. damage to the wood tends to be par for the course on these, as they were built as a tool, and used in combat, and not meant to be beauty queens. if you live in auckland i can direct you to the local encyclopedia if you like, and he will bore you to death with every detail about them.

    • rantykiwi

      It’s a Magazine Lee Enfield Mk I made by Birmingham Small Arms and Machine Co. in 1896. Any chance of a photo of the whole thing? Are there any other markings? And how many of the numbers match?

      • Don W

        I would think it would be a LMLE. Long, Magazine Lee Enfield. The Short ,Magazine Lee Enfield Came in the early 1900S. Our troops when they entered WW1 were still equipped with LMLE know as the Long Tom and I think the ammo they used was somehow different that was used in the SMLE that the Aussie troops were equipped with.

        • rantykiwi

          As an 1896 it’s post the black powder rifles and will have been designed for smokeless cordite propellant.

          • Don W

            I am sure I read somewhere that the ammo for the later SMLE was different to that of the long tom and yes this is well after black powder. Maybe someone out there will know.

          • rantykiwi

            Late 1895 saw the first of the cordite LE rifles. The Mark VII ammunition was introduced around 1910.

          • Don W

            And remained as the round for the life of the rifle but the long tom that the NZ troops didn’t use that ammo as it wasn’t chambered for it , I think.

          • rantykiwi

            And there’s several hundred rounds of it sitting in my safe, rantykiwi and RantyJr for the amusement of.

          • Don W

            Do you have the right 303 to fire you ammo.

          • rantykiwi

            Sure do, as does RantyJr. As an aside, a quick chat with a far more knowledgable LE owner suggests that most of the older MLEs were reworked to use the Mark VII ammunition.

          • Don W

            The British were impressed with effectiveness of the Boers and their 7×57 Mauser actioned rifles and were in the process of developing their 7 mill Mauser actioned rifles . Enfield Arms developed a Mauser type action but ww1 came and with the their army still equipped with 303 LE ,it got put on hold. It was produced as the pattern 14 calibre 303. The home guard during ww2 were equiped wth P14s The US produced the model 1917 which was the same as the p 14 but chambered to take their 3006 round.

      • Richard

        Looks like the stock has been shortened and the top wood removed.
        Barrel and receiver serials are a mismatch.
        Receiver and bolt serials match.
        Back sight and barrel serials match.

        • Don W

          Are you going to fire it.? and will it take modern ammo

    • aero13

      I used to own a 1901 model of these – commonly known as a “Long Tom”. It was fully wooded with a 30″ barrel, & had matching serials. Overall length was 49.5″.

    • rantykiwi
      • Richard

        This is excellent, thanks, I have just read a publication on the NZ issue Lee Enfield Carbine (LEC 88) but am pretty sure it’s not one of these.

      • Isherman

        Good on you RK, that helps my below theory that its Canadian in origin and sold to us anyway, I love digging into these sorts of things, I’ll be bookmarking that.

        • rantykiwi

          Auckland Museum library would be well worth a browse, and also maybe chat to a few of their curatorial and academic staff.

          • Isherman

            Yep, I need to go on my own without the family in tow, I’d easily spend all day in there, but with SWMBO its unlikely to happen. The young fella tends to linger in the Zero and Spitfire rooms for longer than mum likes, then heads to the armoury. Most of the research I get to do there is around medals lists and records as a chunk of my militaria collecting is medal, uniform and insignia based. So much reading, so little time.

    • Moonroof

      OT, but the thread has been interesting to read, there are some knowledgable and helpful troops here, no Dirty Politics reqd. edit sp.

  • SVlover

    Had a hankering for my favourite entrée which I discovered in Fiji. Chilled lettuce wedge with Blue Vein cheese dressing. I had the firm lettuce and went to the supermarket to get the Blue Vein Dressing. The only one I could find at New World, Browns Bay was at the exorbitant price of $6.99. But…I had the hankering. Got home to find that it was gluten free. So? No big deal. But……it was the most disgusting dressing I have ever encountered. Not only was it not the right colour, but it was so far from the flavor of Blue Vein. What is it about gluten free that attracts so many people? It is just yuk!!

    • justhinking

      If you were a coeliac you would be smiling because others have got on the gluten free wagon

      • Disinfectant

        When I was a kid, every baby had coeliac.
        Presumably most grew out of it and a few didn’t.

        • justhinking

          Think you mean colic . Coeliac is the diagnosis for someone who will suffer if they eat any gluten

    • Reaper

      Strange, because I would never put flour into a salad dressing anyway. Just google blue vein dressing recipes and make your own, it’s very easy, and probably much nicer.

      • Platinum Fox

        But would you put vinegar into a salad dressing?
        FYI, sources of gluten which continue to annoy Coeliacs are [undisclosed use of] malt vinegar, malt (which is typically made from barley) and soy sauce (most brands of which are made from wheat). Other products which may contain gluten are sausages, salami, ham and other processed meats, fries, packaged stock and some pharmaceuticals.
        And, BTW, most Coeliacs probably know to avoid items made in kitchens or bakeries which do not take cross contamination seriously.

        • rantykiwi

          My coeliac suffering uncle from the UK loves coming to NZ – being GF here is really easy, whereas in the UK it is a real (and expensive) effort.

          • Platinum Fox

            It’s a heck of a lot easier finding gluten free products in NZ now than it was even ten years ago. It’s less expensive than it was as there are now local bakers producing cookies, pies, pastry and bread, some of which isn’t too bad!
            Most restaurants now know how to accommodate the needs of a Coeliac, though in my experience the level of understanding amongst wait staff can be quite variable. I travel with cards (obtained online) which set out my dietary needs in other languages (and I used the English version in Hawaii a few years ago).

    • Cowgirl

      Miss Clawdy’s restaurant has that as one of their dishes – it is yummy.

    • Isherman

      Just make your own: A handful of chives (5-8), 1/4 cup sour cream, about 125 grams of ya favourite Blue, couple tablespoons of Mayo, 3 tablespoons milk, 1/2 teaspoon English mustard and a squirt of lemon juice. Whack it all into a processor and chill till needed. Cant go wrong.

    • pisces8284 .

      If you need gluten free you just have to put up with tasteless food unfortunately. It’s not that you are attracted to it

    • Dave

      Or walk along the road to the Countdown supermarket on Anzac Road. Always found New World a bit expensive with a restricted choice. Was convenient and excellent service though.

      • Sally

        Dave as you don’t reside in NZ you might be interest to know that New World have built a new larger supermarket on the opposite side of Countdown in Browns Bay. It is due to open shortly. Think Countdown might have a battle on its hands.

        • Moonroof

          Nothing CD doesn’t deserve. Where I am it’s a drive for an alternative. Non-perishables they’re all more or less same, meat or vege, no thanks CD. I’ll drive on.

        • Dave

          Thanks Sally, we lived in Browns bay avert short walk from the centre, could see the French bakery and new world roof from our balcony. And is the new, New World where the garden centre was or in the shape over the road?

          • Sally

            over the road behind the shops

          • Dave

            Where in B/bay were you Sally, we were in Bayview road until mid 2012.

          • Sally

            Live in Murrays Bay .

    • Jafarma

      Time to go back to basics with grandma’s recipe? you know the one – condensed milk, malt vinegar and Colman’s mustard powder?? Still works for me.

    • oldmanNZ

      Gluten, is from wheat and other grains.
      Corn, rice is gluten free.

      Some people are allergic to Gluten, or react badly to it.
      There is a few people I know that are allergic to Gluten.

      As for your cheese dressing, it is mostly made from dairy.
      the Vinegar however, could be derived from wheat? However, as Vinegar is distilled, this usually remove the gluten, so most Vinegars are gluten free.

      But….is it Halal

      • Platinum Fox

        Malt vinegar is not gluten free. Wine (and balsamic) and cider vinegar are gluten free, but any Coeliac with any sense will not take a risk on a product that only lists “vinegar” as an ingredient as there can be no certainty that the product will actually be gluten free.

  • pisces8284 .

    I need to go to bed, I’m getting grumpy….

    • Cadwallader

      How can anybody be grumpy in this happy place? Silly equation really, Little Angry would dislike it here.

  • david

    Train hits pedestrian. Pedestrian dies. Mr plod closes the railway and the road for four hours while he investigates. Never fear, we will solve this crime. elo elo elo, I think it might have been this train that done it. Only its got a cab at both ends, so we cant be sure which way it was going. Same with road accidents – they are now crime scenes. Well the police don’t seem to have any luck with other investigations, so these must help the ‘solved’ percentages. I see reported 3D laser scanners that can record the crime scene – these (or something like this) have been used for some time in UK – they take a scan, clear the road and everyone can get back to their business.

    • rantykiwi

      Darwin award candidate walks in front of train. Case closed.

      • Edward_L

        Worked for London Underground for a bit. In the train drivers’ canteen, those who had hit someone sat together in a really large group.
        Compulsory time off each incident.
        Some had hit three.
        They were really fed up with ‘jumpers’ and idiots. I mean, they have to live with seeing the violent death of a stranger.
        They explained their feelings like this;
        ‘Don’t they know what the river’s for?’

  • I.M Bach

    I realised I didn’t have a copy of my employment agreement, asked for one, got one, casually read through it. Nothing weird except I am the only one who signed it. Is it still legally binding?

    I’m not thinking of jacking it in but if I was offered a better deal and, for example, needed to leave my current job in two weeks as opposed to supplying their required four weeks notice could I walk and not be penalised?

    • Wendy

      My non legal opinion is yes it would still be legally binding because there is clear intent on behalf of the employer to employ you in the capacity to which your employment agreement relates.

      There is an implied contract, at the very least, because you turn up for work as required and perform your duties, and your employer pays you.

      If there was an issue over your employment and your employer took the position of “well we never signed the contract”, they would be slammed by the court.

    • Cadwallader

      I would say you can walk. If you are correct in saying your employer failed to sign the agreement too then there is no contract, only an intention to create legal relations. Besides once an employer learns you are planning to move on most will understand that keeping you around against your will is against their best interests too.

  • Huia

    I have met her on Norfolk Island and have enjoyed all of her books. Sorry to hear she has passed.

  • I.M Bach

    With so many products being Halal certified (why is beyond me), including Mainland cheese, a buddy of mine and I were joking that Harley Davidson could improve their Middle Eastern sales by becoming Halarly Davidson. As the machines are commonly referred to as ‘hogs’ the irony would be monumental.

  • Huia

    Very nice, big lady and going blind but full of life and enthusiasm. Did a steam train trip into the Blue mountains with her and she was fun. Very bright and an avid gardener.

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