Whaleoil General Debate

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Credit: ex-Jafa

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  • Korau

    Word of the day

    acedia (noun) – Apathy; boredom; sloth.

    Pronunciation : http://wordsmith.org/words/acedia.mp3

    Source : http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/acedia

    Etymology : From Latin acedia, from Greek akedia, from a- (not) + kedos (care). Earliest documented use: 1607.

    • Phoenician

      Mmmmm……. sloth, my second favourite sin!

  • idbkiwi

    The latest from Gareth-“I’ve been to North Korea and it’s all hoki-mai”-Morgan:

    “Pakeha were outnumbered 10-one. If they hadn’t come up with something reasonable, they would have got eaten”

    What a silly man. Where does he pull this stuff from?

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11389944

    • Ilovelife

      The man is clearly unwell.

      • Wheninrome

        Unimportant is another word, or irrelevant. There are a host of words to describe someone who is feeling the need for headlines.

    • metalnwood

      Just read the article, he has some ‘interesting’ views. I like the one about being eaten. He is essentially saying that pakeha had a gun to their head. If they didn’t come up with something like the treaty they would have got eaten.

      Yet, every claim were are supposed to honour may have been done in a similar vein as maori didnt have much choice I assume.

      Today, if you wrote and signed a piece of paper on threat of death you would end up getting it invalidated later..

      His point goes both ways.

    • dgrogan

      If you think the RMA is troublesome, imagine what a 50% Maori Upper House in Parliament would be like – or any Upper House for that matter.
      Not forgetting too, that we’ve ditched one already, as cumbersome and unnecessary.

      • Dave

        Imagine the Rorts, the employing of totally unqualified and unskilled Whanau, the loss of hundreds of millions a year from taxpayer funds and a total lack of any control. Before I’m dissed about criticising the potential chaos a 50% upper Maori house would create, think of the finances of some Maori trusts and the infighting and administrative issues. I’m surprised Peter Jackson hasn’t signed that tribe and Their IWI up to a movie deal based on the car movie “Gone in 60 seconds” or the romance “How to lose a guy in 7 days”. (NB. The positive results of the Nga Tahu assets and trusts is acknowledged)

        • pidge

          “Imagine the Rorts, the employing of totally unqualified and unskilled
          Whanau, the loss of hundreds of millions a year from taxpayer funds and a
          total lack of any control.”

          You forgot a sarcasm tag. That’s already happening!

        • kehua

          I recall that both Ngai Tahu and Tainui experienced the same situation in the early days of their Settlements, I also believe that had this particular Settlement happened whilst Sir Hepi Te Heu Heu was alive it would have been a completely different scenario. Is it really that much different to Labour squandering the spoils of their last term in Government?

          • Dave

            Whilst I agree the last (and many other) Labour government squandered taxpayers funds, it was spent on items they set as priorities, and it was accounted for. We might not agree with what they spent the funds on, but the management and accountability was largely there unlike this Maori trust.

          • kehua

            ahhh but the big difference there DAve is that it was your money and my money that Labour squandered, in the Tuwharetoa situation it was the tribal members money that was squandered by an inept and possibly fraudulent Board. Bearing in mind that some 29 million was spent on Marae I would suspect that Taupo, Taumarunui and Turangi businesses have done very well out of it.

          • Dave

            Yes, it was their money, money Given to them by the taxpayers, yours, mine and every other taxpayer of NZ, and they squandered it. If they ever come back with their hand out (and they will), they should be told NO, go make up the $50 mill you blew. My real issue, is that could have been used to insulate and heat almost every iwi’s home, or provided uni schlorships for every one of the IWI’s children for many years and really improved their lot, but now, its not going to happen, its been squandered, a massive lost opportunity. My one hope out of these lessons, any future settlements are Tagged, and come with convenants on spending and management. What is apparent over and over, Maori boards cannot manage (largely) these huge settlements unassisted.

          • kehua

            I do not disagree with your last sentence, I do disagree that the money was `Given`, the money was paid in Settlement.

    • Wheninrome

      He will be putting on a blue blazer, getting his teeth whitened, appear smiling on a billboard near you and proclaiming he is the second coming sent to save us all, after all he invested in trademe and that was a success.

    • Wheninrome

      Maybe he has found the canoe his ancestors travelled on to NZ and wants to get on board and get a piece of the action.

    • The Accountant

      Why should I be forced to adopt a culture I can’t relate with? Yes, some aspects I can, and do emulate. But why should I have to sing songs in Maori, sit round on marae while a host of speeches go on and on, eat too much (or have practically everything focused on eatting), sleep communially, and a raft of other things that make up the culture. And why should Maori have more than proportional representation in a democracy. If they so outnumbered Pakeha, then didn’t they let the advantage slip? Bit like whats happening with Muslims in Europe, eh?

      For perspective: my wife and children are Maori, and I encourage them to embrace their culture, if they want to.

    • Sailor Sam

      But I thought that “maori” claimed they were not cannibals, they never ate people.
      Or are they happy now to admit cannibalism?

    • Wheninrome

      Pakeha would have been outnumbered, however outgunned no. The only reason someone comes to the bargaining table is if they think they will be better off. If Maori had held the winning hand there would have been absolutely no reason for them to have signed the Treaty.
      Maori should reflect how much better off they were signing a Treaty with England, imagine their lot if they had been fighting with the French or Spanish.
      I do reflect sometimes on life for Maori if “nasty western ways” had not come to these shores. A forgotten tribe who may have survived, or would one tribe have “eaten” or enslaved the rest and then become inbred like the Egyptians.
      Progress has a cost but as long as the cost does not outweigh the benefits the balance is fine.
      So who wants a smart phone, big TV, or a new car. (depending on your view of benefit)

    • Mark

      He needs to make up his mind,exterminated them or outnumbered 10-1 so Pakeha became reasonable,which is it?

  • conwaycaptain

    20 days of peace left and then those empty brained BOZOS come back to Parliament.

  • dgrogan

    The Herald reports breast-feeding banned at a breast-feeding summit. It was said by organisers at the NHS to be ‘not appropriate’.

    “The Scottish Government-organised Breastfeeding Summit had been planned to kick off a year-long commitment to promote breastfeeding. A number of volunteers and NHS workers however who requested to attend the event complained after they were told the venue was “not designed to accommodate” breastfeeding, it has been reported.”

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=11390060

    You really couldn’t make this up!

    • Hedgehog

      I shake my head in despair at the lack of common sense displayed these days. Seems to be a prerequisite for the public service.

  • Hedgehog

    For once the Herald has a positive piece on John Key by Fran O’Sullivan. As usual the comments are all from the same contributers and almost all negative. I had to respond, but doubt it will be included.

    “I am glad John Key is representing NZ and long may he do so. He is the greatest PM we have had to date and has steered the country successfully through some pretty disastrous times. I read with disdain the regular critics who appear in the comments section, pushing their myopic beliefs under the guise of knowing whats best for us all. How conceited. Truth be known, most just can’t stand a success story, or a successful person.”

    • George

      We need the regular critics of JK. The constant winging and tantrums that they present as opinion and/or facts just highlights the socialist’s hollow world of envy and bitterness. They just enhance the status of JK.

    • [MOD] please read our commenting rules again.

  • Korau

    More on the missing $50 million.
    Yesterday there was some discussion on an iwi that had lost $50 mil of their 2009 $66 mil settlement. There is more on the story here http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/te-manu-korihi/264216/iwi-leader-tuwharetoa-will-bounce-back including naming the iwi.

    What interested me is comments from Haami Piripi – from Te Rarawa Runanga in the Far North, who said some really interesting things, like:

    “Mr Piripi said Tuwharetoa had a history of sound financial management.

    He said all iwi have a need for increased financial support to
    understand and utilise financial advice and the government should have a
    role.

    “It’s no use just handing us redress payments and assets and just walking away from the relationship.”

    They are preparing to hold out the begging bowl again! It’s all whiteys fault they lost the dosh!

    • dgrogan

      Well, actually the Iwi has a valid point, Korau. What they are saying is it’s the fault of Pakeha, because they just handed Maori the money and didn’t teach them how to invest it and grow it.

      If you think about it, that’s exactly why social welfare doesn’t work either. Charity does NOT encourage enterprise – regardless of the size of it. What it teaches is where to find more handouts.

      • Korau

        What would the iwi have said to any offer to educate it in financial matters? I can just hear the diatribe playing out in my head.

        • dgrogan

          Condescending
          Racist
          Usurper
          Arrogant
          White m f

          • Wheninrome

            and I wouldn’t want my daughter marrying one.

        • Cadwallader

          The response would have been:”More colonialist bullying.” Or something similar. No pleasing the greedy.

        • kehua

          It is not as though some of these people did not have experience, the difference is I believe , that they had no experience of such an amount. The `crime` in all this is the 11 million spent on Admin and fees. I was in Wellington on business when I walked out of my Hotel onto the street and bugger me here were all these people that I knew from Turangi, they were were there for the formal ceremony, it was not really that long ago. It has been a very short spendfest.

      • Dave

        Totally disagree they were not taught. The old adage a fool and his money……. Maori have long known they were due for large windfalls and this can be proven. There are shining examples of fiscal and best practice operations from other Maori. This trust and its IWI could have sought out sound management, could have sent them to the best financial management courses, and could have been sitting on a huge windfall and using the ample returns to fund their iwi’s education and welfare, in turn breaking the cycles they blame whitey for. But no, the entrenched if it’s good it’s our heritage, if it is not good, it’s whiteys fault.

        • Ginny

          Um… So no one else has lost money through poor management, lack of advice?

          • Dave

            Yes, quite a few, but they tend to get sunlight shone on them and be held to account.

          • Wheninrome

            And, dare I say it, often end up in jail.

        • OneTrack

          And when they get their next “full and final” payment, who are the ones laughing all the way to the bank – it isn’t the taxpayers. But, look, you don’t need that operation anyway. Just keep working harder Boxer.

      • MaryLou

        Yes, but if you listen to those who champion welfare, as well as iwi when negotiations are set up, you’ll hear that it is against the recipients Human Rights to act paternalistically, and try to tell grown adults what to do with THEIR money. That’s why we can’t give out food and clothing vouchers.

    • pak

      This makes my blood boil. Piripi’s words that iwi are”often forced into a competitive capitalist environment which was not always compatible with the way iwi have historically functioned” is revelatory. This constant harking back to the past is one of the things that is holding Maori back. It seems extraordinary to me that knowing they would be receiving such a large sum of money they did not seek professional advice and put in place proper financial arrangements as others have done. To now claim “government” should be holding their hand and showing them what to do with the windfall is … well I am speechless!

      • Cowgirl

        I cannot upvote this comment enough. Can you imagine if the government tried to tell them what to do with the money????

    • PsychoKea

      Perhaps Gareth Morgan can make good the loss for the iwi instead of droning on about matters he doesn’t seem very well educated on, I suppose he had thrashed the cat issue for all it was worth

    • taurangaruru

      You can imaging the outcry if the Government did step in & dictate where & how money was invested – words like racists, colonialists etc etc. Maori would be off complaining to the UN all hell would break loose.

  • Aucky

    ‘Toddler’s mum screaming’.

    That’s the main headline in todays online Herald. Not content with that the Herald proceeds to give a full description from an eye-witness to this poor woman’s natural reactions to her baby’s death. It is a tasteless and piece of writing with scant regard for the family and the staff of Wanganui Hospital.

    • Dave

      There is far better reporting of the tragedy in the Courier Mail (Brisbane), yesterday they even published the woman’s role at the hospital, very surprising and I have to concede this is likely a tragic accident.

      • Cadwallader

        It is a tragedy without question. Last night Larry Williams spoke to a doctor from USA who described “forgotten baby syndrome.” It seems this type of incident is not unknown. I stress I am horrified by this awful outcome but find it difficult to imagine how anyone could forget they had an infant child in their vehicle no matter how many things were occupying thought processes. I forget to do things all the time ie to go to the supermarket etc but overlooking the fact you have left a child in a car is a stretch. I am sure this poor woman will be utterly devastated by her loss and oversight. It was a grossly negligent oversight but to elevate it to a syndrome seems hazardous.

        • Mark

          I am pleased to see the clamping down in various ways on talking to the media about this.
          I can accept it is a tragic event & I have no doubt this woman is indeed utterly devastated.
          I have no idea how you could possibly cope with this.
          I will note that at the bottom of today’s article their were some quite helpful ideas on how to remember a child is in the car.

        • kehua

          As a 10 year old I left my 2 yo brother in a pushchair on the footpath outside the vege shop in Taupo `s main St. I got home with the veges about half an hour later and mum said where`s your brother. Needless to say I bolted back and little bro was still where I had left him. All these years later I realise I should never have gone back.

        • LesleyNZ

          I heard that interview. I just don’t see it that way. Seems we now have a syndrome for everything that happens that could have been avoided. Just dreadful that when you forget to take a baby/toddler out of the car and it dies, the tragic death is recorded as the result of a “forgotten baby syndrome” – “forgotten baby”? It should really be called “The Too Much of a Busy Life Syndrome”.

          • Cadwallader

            To overlook your child being in the car pre-supposes:
            1 The child is in a restraint and on the back seat behind the dirver;and
            2 The child is asleep or at least silent.
            This car was left early in the day in a carpark on the hospital grounds. It is unlikely the child would’ve been asleep at that hour. I feel enormously for her but just can’t imagine how she did it. I am not being hard-hearted just thinking back to when my children were infants.

        • Wendy

          I have heard many stories of children being forgotten. It happens, and to the most caring and responsible of parents. It obviously happens enough for someone to have come up with a syndrome for it.

      • Mrs_R

        I don’t believe this is a ‘tragic accident’. The child died as a result of the mothers careless negligence and the torment and suffering she is now experiencing is no more than she deserves. Excuses no doubt will be made but the result will still be the same, a child died under needless circumstances, and I find the efforts of those defending the mother misplaced (this last comment is not directed at you Dave but rather the tone of the reporting now coming out).

    • Papillon

      As a mother who has had a baby die (due to medical reasons), I have found this reporting appalling. Most of the information is not in the public interest to know. You could report it from the point of view of making people aware, and the strategies available to help prevent this. But I don’t need to know her name, what her role was, how the families at her child’s daycare feel or what her heartbreaking response to the incident was. It distresses me greatly knowing these heartless media reporters are hanging out at her workplace looking for information that as I say, I don’t see as being in the public interest.

      My heart goes out to her for the pain she will endure for the rest of her life. Every Christmas, birthday, holiday that her child is not here is a painful reminder of what she has lost.

      • Aucky

        I can’t even begin to comprehend what that poor woman is going through. To lose your child must be a horrific enough experience without the element of self-blame which she is going to have on her shoulders. That the Herald has chosen to sensationalise this tragedy with an emotive headline and poor reporting is quite unacceptable.

  • Hard1

    You fork out all that dosh, but there is a speedway that’s noisy, so we’ll get together and get the Council to move it.
    And then there is this Gibbon that keeps us awake at night.Better get the Council to kill it.
    “Iwani was euthanased on Tuesday because of ongoing welfare issues, said the zoo’s head of life sciences, Kevin Buley.
    The gibbon’s frequent loud calling could be heard at homes and parks near the zoo in Western Springs.”
    Excuse me for being cynical.

  • Michael

    The media were falling all over themselves yesterday to promote the Australasian Railway Associations report that you would save $10,000 a year by using public transport over driving to work.

    I took the time to read the actual report last night, the savings are nowhere near that much – unless you:

    1. Only buy new cars.
    2. Are willing to sell your car (and not buy a replacement).
    3. Work in the CBD.
    4. Live near a railway station or bus route that takes you directly to the CBD.

    If you keep the car the savings of public transport over driving to work were between $500 and $2000 per annum, depending on the distance you live from your workplace. But that depended on:

    1. Working in the CBD
    2. Living near a public transport option that took you direct to the CBD.

    All in all, lazy reporting on a report from a pro-rail lobby group.

    • dgrogan

      Who commissioned that report again? Oh that’s right, the Australasian Railway Association. But then dodgy science never got in the way of a dogma-laden story from Greens either. Just out of interest, it would be interesting to see what an Association of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers would make of that report.

    • Greg M

      I’m an Auckland CBD resident / business operator, and I swore at the telly when that was on. It was an absolutely dishonest piece of puffery that was fundamentally flawed.More than 80% of Auckland has no public transport close by that actually takes people where they want to go, unless you want to spend hours changing buses and trains etc.
      If you live in Murrays Bay and work in Onehunga with a 9 am start time, it takes 1 hr 50 mins, 3 buses and costs $15 one way.

      I’m surprised the guy wasn’t wearing a “vote Len Brown” badge on his lapel.

      • Cowgirl

        As a former CBD resident I concur – getting somewhere in the suburbs was a nightmare and catching buses even on a main bus route into the city was terrible. More often than not, scheduled buses didn’t arrive and were seldom on time. We were convinced that Kingland was the Bermuda Triangle of Auckland buses.

      • Isherman

        Correct, and with gas and diesel prices falling like the Labour Party vote share, has there been a decrease in the ticket price of public transport?..I’m picking no. So the equation just doesn’t add up at all.

    • pidge

      I’ve got a provided parking space as I’m requried to be able to dash off. Costs me just under 2L of petrol a day for my ~20km round trip, which takes about 20-30 minutes each way door-to-desk. Taking the bus is about an hour each way, and $9 a day (with the HOP card discount) (bus to Britomart, then walk or City Link bus to near work). Yeah, Nah, I’ll drive.

      Having to pay for parking probably wouldn’t tip it over to “take the bus” as I’d prefer to keep the extra hour a day of my time.

    • Quinton Hogg

      I have a park at work.
      It takes 7 minutes to drive from home to work.
      I could use public transport but that is 45 minutes plus each way, although that timing was based on a round trip undertaken in the weekend with light traffic volumes.
      nah, i’ll drive

    • Whitey

      Native advertising.

  • WeaselKiss

    It’s going to be interesting, and fun, to share our ‘Whaleoil encounter stories’ once we start wearing our new caps around.
    Hope I don’t get smacked over, never had that before.
    It’ll probably happen now.

    • I have yet to have a single negative experience wearing the polo. People have commented on it , or asked why I was wearing one. Once I tell them, they generally want to know about Cam. #alwaysthebridesmaid ;)

      • LesleyNZ

        Next time you will have to catch the bouquet of flowers!

      • Mine it,Drill it,Sell it.

        IMHO next time you need help,remember the industrialist Henry Ford.You can have any colour as long as it is Black !

    • Justsayn

      You could always say that you’re hoping to pick up Jason Ede’s old job

    • kehua

      What is more interesting is that we have thousands of people that we `converse ` with on sometimes a daily basis and in reality enjoy or get miffed with and yet these same people could pass each other on the street and be completely oblivious to the fact that they have in some cases been supporting or debating with each other for years. I do think that the time will come and indeed probably already has where there would be a facility on here to let people know when one of the WOBH community has passed on.

  • Doc45

    I am trying to figure out why Mr Morgan is suddenly expert in all matters. Are we so desperately short of real experts we need to call in a two minute wonder and give them so much space?
    I suggest the wider issues around what place Maori play in our future as a nation are not going away. Schools are spending increasing time and resource on Maori language and culture and an incoming generation of adults are viewing that world much differently than the out-going generation.
    There are difficult questions to answer around what is Maori, whether Maori needs to be defined, whether separatism in any form helps the Maori cause, why Maori are over represented in negative stats etc. I guess we will gloss over the hard questions with frilly, frothy stuff about preserving language and culture.
    I took the time to read the NgaiTahu claim. It was sobering. There were some very dodgy deals done especially over property. I am inclined to favour generous settlements that recognise property rights abuse. But that opens doors to another type of abuse as we have seen in the last 48 hours. It leads to wider and more frequent claims sustained by what is now a very fat, entrenched grievance, gravy train elite.
    I also tend toward giving local iwi a prominent role in the management and care of our national parks, reserves, rivers etc and related in view of their historic attachment to their mountain and their river. Without limiting access obviously. Beyond that every effort should be about building a nation of one people and one culture.

    • PsychoKea

      What makes you think that Maori can do a better job of managing National Parks, I’m not aware of any special skills that Maori have in conservation matters

      • Doc45

        I do not disagree with you. I have an open mind on the issue and believe we need practical solutions. Would it do any harm for them to be more involved in a prescribed manner?

        • PsychoKea

          I just don’t see what the point is, apart from trying to be all touchy Feely with iwi, Maori have the same opportunity to be involved in National Parks as any other NZer and that is the way it should stay

          • kehua

            Thanks for that , you are very generous, almost as generous as Ngati Tuwharetoa who gifted National Park to the Nation.

          • PsychoKea

            Gifted a very small (less than 5%) part of what is now the Tongario NP, to stop other Maori from flogging it off for personal gain I believe, but yes a noble gesture

    • taurangaruru

      A bloke who made a pot of money from his son’s success (& good luck to him btw) is now our foremost expert on socio-economics, felinology, travel & of course the wonders of modern day Communism via his trip to North Korea. Why can’t he just be like the rest of us & undertake his world wide travels, take lots of photos & hold slide evenings where he can bore his immediate family to death instead of polluting the airways with his socialist white liberal hand wringing guilt trips.
      BTW Gareth your own track record ain’t that flash, care to compare Kiwi Saver fund provider performance maybe?

      • WeaselKiss

        I just assumed they keep asking him stuff because they can’t get hold of Russel N yet.

  • Grumpy of Onehunga

    Following a traffic blitz in Auckland yesterday, a police sergeant is quoted as saying that a “shocking” 34 motorists were found to have an alcohol level just below the legal limit. So, it is now shocking to be within the law? Or is it shocking that they were unable to meet their quota?

    • TonyM

      Haha, and this the new legal limit. It must have been super shocking a few months ago (oh dear, silly over use of english language means you run out of superlatives quickly).

    • Geoff

      I read that and thought it strange that the policeman was shocked 34 motorists were under the new limit. I would have thought ‘pleased’ was a more appropriate response. It’s a strange world we live in.

      • Captain Darling

        Especially as 2 months ago they would have been well under.

    • Wheninrome

      Perhaps he was “shocked” at the small number under the limit.

  • Hakaru

    Hopefully when New Zealand designs a new passport they can use the Canadian example and add some fun to them. Check out the link.
    http://news.nationalpost.com/2015/01/20/new-canadian-passports-dark-and-incredible-secrets-revealed-but-youre-going-to-need-a-black-light/

    • johcar

      Hey – how come they can get ten year passports and we are stuck with five years. Bring back 10 years, I say!!!

      • TonyM

        I thought they were discussing changing back to 10 years

        • TonyM

          Bet you though that while it costs the same to go from a 10 year passport to a 5 year one, it will cost double to get a 10 year one. ;-)

        • johcar

          I hope so!

    • peterwn

      The Canadians have NZ’s passport printing contract so Canadian passport features could well flow on to NZ passports. The Canadians in turn need to have maximum security passports to keep the USA authorities happy.

      • Wheninrome

        I am all for maximum security passports, why not.

    • LabTested

      The NZ one is pretty unique. On a couple of occasions I have had immigration officials in europe pass it over to colleagues to look at all the pretty pictures. The big pain is that it only last 4 & 1/2 years before I have to replace it

      • Cowgirl

        Haha I have had a Canadian stop and admire mine – guess he’d never put his own under a black light.

        • kehua

          Lucky girl, have admired a few Canadian ones myself.

      • I.M Bach

        But on the cover there are words that very few can understand. I, and millions of others, get the ‘New Zealand Passport’ bit but the rest? Not so much.

  • conwaycaptain

    As I said yesterday it was by 68th birthday and last night my friends from Timaru phoned.
    They have on order for me a bottle of Pussers Rum. Yes Whale Oilers the original RN Pussers Squirt.
    So all you ex RN and RNZN Matelots that can remember the Rum Issue eat your heart out!!!

    • Intrigued

      Happy birthday for yesterday CC and enjoy that rum! Dad is an old sea dog and loves the stuff too. I hadn’t heard of Pussers so will have to look that one up for his birthday! Cheers!

    • Greg M

      Happy birthday Captain. Look what I have lurking in the drinks cabinet. You should call in next time you’re up this way.
      ( pic )

      • ex-JAFA

        Hey! You’re blocking my pic of Admiral Gial (“Allahu”) Ackbar!

    • WeaselKiss

      Sweet deal Capt.
      I’m coming over to Putaruru soon, if you spot a very heavy-built chap walking down the street wearing a WO cap, sing out we can go back to your place for a Pussers.
      Did 9 years at sea myself, I got some stories too!

    • Cadwallader

      Happy Birthday! I had not heard of this brand of rum. You see, I had a sheltered upbringing until I started visiting here.

    • edee

      Happy Birthday Capt!
      Have had these 2 little bottles of Pussers Rum for many years. Still unopened, so now could have turned into rocket fuel. Enjoy your tipples.

      • johcar

        I think they probably STARTED as rocket fuel…

    • Isherman

      Many happy returns CC!

    • jude

      I did a tally of ages from people who offered there’s up on back chat last night, and roughly the split looks like this.
      Ages 70 bracket 2 people.
      Age 60 -69 :11 people.
      Age 50-59 : 10 people.
      Age 40-49 : 11 people.
      Age 30-39 :3 people and the youngest was one person of 28!

      • Blue

        I’m 44, so another to add to Age 40-49 bracket.

        • jude

          done:)

          • Aucky

            Add me to the 70s.

          • jude

            done:)

          • Gunner

            Gunner 94 years old. Should I leave?

          • jude

            No most definitely not:) I shall add you in.

          • kehua

            60-69 got me covered.

          • jude

            We are over on tonights Back chat. Some of our regulars would love to chat:)

      • patriot

        Add me to the 50-59ers..

        • jude

          done

      • Rocket

        May not be the oldest WhaleOiler, but can I claim the title for longest surviving road maggot? Can’t even use Mamil at 73!

        • jude

          I shall add you in, and I do not think you are the eldest:)

      • JAFA Gazza

        You can add me to the 50-59’ers…..*sigh*

        • jonno1

          And me to the (ahem) 7th decade. Oh dear.

          • jude

            done

        • jude

          ok done

      • George Costanza

        I refuse to believe i’m the youngest, surely there’s someone else who can have the honour…

        • jude

          I can’t add my 18 ,21 Or,23 year old they are selective readers and don’t generally comment:)

    • Je Suis Charlie – Respect!!

      Remember to put it in the freezer first.

  • DavidW

    Did anyone else misconstrue the contents of the article when they read the Herald headline “Women in labour prefer men to push off – research”?
    Childbirth crossed my mind second to another rather more predictable scenario

    • edee

      Straight away I jumped to the wrong conclusion and I never gave childbirth a thought. Although if Cunners had has his way it could well have been a reality.

  • conwaycaptain

    Now the story of Pussers rum is that:

    When the RN stopped the Tot it was because they found out that the ratings were well over the driving limit if they had also had a beer!!!!

    Now this enterprising Yank went to the RN and he got the rights to the rum and he gave a donation to a RN Charity for every bottle he sold. Fair enough.

    Eventually he sold out to an Argie and after the Falklands this Argie didnt like supporting her Brittanic Majesty’s Royal Navy so let the brand go down.

    The Yank bought the rights off him and therefore we still have the Pussers Rum.

  • conwaycaptain

    When they stopped the tot and the RN sold off all the measuring jugs, rum barrels etc they went for a pretty piece. RNZN was the last Navy to issue the tot but they can still Splice the Mainbrace I beleive

    • Greg M

      I still have an old copper grog cup stowed away somewhere…

    • Je Suis Charlie – Respect!!

      Yup still get a splice but its not the same as we used to get.

  • rantykiwi

    More “quality” reporting from the Herald which shows that even simple maths is beyond them. They write that James Pascoe has bought more shares in The Warehouse for $817 billion – in which case we have a new richest NZ company.

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