What is one thing about New Zealand you would love to fix, if you had the power to?

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That’s the essence behind ACT’s current campaign “The way you want it”.

HOW IT WORKS

In five minutes of video, or five hundred words, tell us how you’d like to see New Zealand.

So, how would you like it?

10 million people? More money? More dolphins, fewer rednecks? Cheaper houses? Old values? New ideas? Better careers? Finally finish off tall poppies? There is no restriction on ideas, so long as they answer the question; how would you like New Zealand to be?

There’s even five prizes up for grabs.  

The Prize

In five minutes or five hundred words, tell us how you’d like to see New Zealand to win one of five prizes of $500. The five winners will present their idea at ACT’s 2015 conference at a farm with giraffes. The ultimate winner will win a total prize of $2000. The finalists will be chosen by our expert panel led by Prof. Robert McCulloch, the winner will be chose by popular vote on the day.

Timing

Entries close February 7, finalists announced Feb 14, Final Feb 21.

ACT are going social, and more importantly, have started to campaign for the 2017 election.  This is the part of the election cycle where you can relax and shoot the political breeze without the rapacious “political journalists” dissecting everything for hidden meaning, policy inconsistencies or personal mistakes.

And what better time to sit back and have a chat?   We’re not under any particular pressure right now – the country seems to be ticking along.  But there are a few things that eat away at you.  I’m sure there are.

Why not write a small essay (up to 500 words), or film yourself for a clip up to 5 minutes with how you would change New Zealand if you had the power to do so.

I’ve given it a go.  If for no other reason than to win and be invited to speak at the ACT conference!   But seriously, this is like a ‘new years resolution’ for the country.

What can we make better?

 


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  • steve and monique

    Wont need 500 words. Remove the treaty, and its collective trough industry.

    • I.M Bach

      Very good point. We could start with that traitor Finlayson, then turf out the rest of that ‘tribunal’ and see if they get jobs in the real world. What a scam!

    • Amanda Atkinson

      And … also remove rednecks, like you. Get rid of Treaty Troughers, yes agreed. The treaty is not the problem. Whinging Maori AND rednecks are the problem. Most Maori, just want what was stolen to be given back, but do not use it an excuse to be destructive or useless citizens. Most Pakeha, want the the Treaty settled, so long as the money is going to filter down (again, yes get rid of the Treaty Gravy train and its troughers). Rednecks are no better than those whinging Maori who blame the white man for everything. Both are minorities. Both are part of the problem, and not not part of the solution. Both are given far too much air time.

      • James

        Not sure what is “redneck” about wanting to get rid of a 175 year old document that is no longer relevant to modern life in New Zealand. Burn it, draft up a decent constitution that starts with the explicit point that all New Zealanders are born equal and should be treated as such under law and then get on with looking forward rather than trying to work out what our ancestors did or did not mean when they signed the treaty.

        Oh, and many New Zealanders find the “p-word” to be highly offensive – not sure if you knew this but its not the sort of thing to be dropped into polite conversation if you don’t want to offend (not saying that you shouldn’t – it is your right to offend whosoever you wish … just that you may not wish to do so).

        • shykiwibloke

          I dont mind being called ‘Pakeha’ – just dont draw a picture or cartoon of me…

        • I.M Bach


          66% of New Zealanders believe that ‘pakeha’ was originally an insulting term, including 44% of Maori”
          http://sayit.co.nz/blog/it-insulting-be-called-pakeha

          The fact that ‘pakeha’ is shorter than ‘pakehakeha’ is of limited importance – plenty of other words have been shortened in regular usage (e.g. ‘bike’ and ‘pram’).

          So basically we’re left with a choice – we can either believe that Maori first referred to Europeans as ‘fair skinned beings resembling men’ (with a possible connection with the sea) or as ‘a group of turnips’.

          • James

            Not sure what it originally was but it has definitely been used in a derogatory way in the past; both my parents and grandparents take very strong offence over the word due to it being used as an insult at them (my parents were shocked when they came back to NZ after a 15 year absence to see it printed in the papers).

            I personally don’t like it and would never use it myself; then again I also don’t like NZ European as I have no real familial links to Europe (I assume that both sides of the family tree originated somewhere in Europe – but I couldn’t say for sure – all I know is that I am a New Zealander or a Kiwi).

          • Albert Lane

            I was always told that the term Pakeha was a derivation from the early white settlers and military, who, when asked for money or food by Maoris, would say “Bugger Ya”, which became “Pakeha”.

        • Amanda Atkinson

          If you are offended by that. .. it says much about you than it does about me. The last people i expected to see on whale oil were the word police. I thougt the nanny state were the lefties. Any way … lucky for us JK watches the polls and the mood of middle new zealand ( as cam credits him for) and he knows that most kiwis want the treaty honored. So it’s a non issue because thankfully turfing the treaty out is somethung only suported by very few kiwis and it would seem they are all here on whale oil tonight.

          • James

            I pointed out that many people found it offensive (I don’t find it offensive, I just don’t like it). I then went on to say that it was your right to offend whosoever you wish but that you may not wish to do so (not everyone realises that people find it offensive). Not exactly word police – upholding someone’s right to offend.

            The post below points out that 66% of New Zealanders (including 44% of Maori) believe that it was an insulting term; so I doubt that you didn’t realise that people find it insulting but I was trying to assist you with your argument as I find that people being insulted by someone are less likely to listen to what they say.

          • Amanda Atkinson

            Fair enough, moot point in any case. My main point is, the majority of Kiwis, Maori and Non-Maori (is that better?) have a good faith attitude to the treaty. This majority are part of the solution. The minority (whinging, useless, chip on their shoulder Maori + redneck, racist non-maori) are part of the problem. For the avoidance of doubt, to all those giving me lots of definitions for it, I use redneck very loosely, to describe an intolerant and unhelpful attitude to race issues. Of course I am not referring pick up driving, baseball cap wearing Southern Americans.

      • No maori living today had land stolen from them. No pakeha living today stole land from them.The only theft happening now is in treaty settlements: governments stealing from the majority to appease the minority.

        • Bazza63

          Not quite true, during the world war 2 the government took land for the war effort & forgot to give it back. Like taxes once some thing is taken/increased by the Government for a specific purpose once the requirement has gone they do not return/decrease it.

        • Dave

          “Government stealing from the majority to appease the minority” with huge treaty settlements, AND whilst we still support them with disproportionate welfare payments and the special privilidge payments for their culture, things like the money for Maori Language, for Kahanga Reo and so on, the entire list is huge.

          • kehua

            Jeez Dave, ya smokin on this one, non Maori collect way more by way of welfare payments, you want to talk culture try the funding spent on Symphony Orchestra, NZ Ballet, Yacht races, Rugby tournements, Maori language is hardly in the race(haha)when it comes to foreign language expenditure and Kohanga gets a very minor part of PreSchool education Budget. I am surprised at the angst out there for this, I can only conclude that if that is all you have to be concerned about then you are really living in Utopia.

          • Dave

            I disagree, the money spent on kohanga is disproportionate with both the results and the funds allocated to maori / non maori. As to the ballet and NZSO, they should be largely self funding, however, remember they serve all residents whereas the Kahango funding benefits far more maori than non Maori. Let’s just have one nz for all without any special groups at all.

        • Amanda Atkinson

          OK I’ll steal your house, and tell my kids, when your kids ask for the house back, to just say “it wasn’t stolen from you and it wasn’t us who stole it”.

      • SlightlyStrange

        But its NOT trickling down for the most part. At least, the evidence that keeps being put out there is of poor maori who are not seeing any assistance from their affiliated settlements.

        • I.M Bach

          Yup, the Maori elite are a major stumbling block when it comes to ‘trickle-down’.

          • kehua

            Well they are not alone in that, they had great role models over the years, Fay, Richwhite, Gibbs …………..

        • Sailor Sam

          Agree, the millions handed out to Tainui are not getting the the average ‘maori” in the street, just look at Ngaruawhahia, Huntly and Hopu Hopu.
          Then compare that to Novotel Hotels in Hamilton and Auckland Airport, the Base in Te Rapa etc etc etc.

          • Albert Lane

            The average Auckland Maori who has lost touch with his tribe, gains nothing at all from the Treaty.

      • I.M Bach

        The treaty is the problem because it can be interpreted in so many ways, hence the ‘principles of the treaty’ and decades of trying to appease the claimants. I don’t doubt there were injustices, there were plenty when Vikings sacked Lindisfarne, when the Romans cut loose all over the place and do you want to talk about injustices? Have a chat to the Jews. Maori have had, and continue to get, a pretty good deal in NZ, especially the elite, that’s how tribalism works. Many hard-working Maori have left for Oz because of this and they sure as hell don’t (can’t) hold their hand out in Oz, they just get on with life. The treaty should be retained for what it is, just an old rotting document. It has no relevance in modern NZ. Ahh, but you’ll just call me a redneck and part of the problem.

        • Amanda Atkinson

          Yup correct!

      • Dave

        Amanda, it has been rectified over and over and we the government on behalf of all kiwis continue to pay. And the Maori whingers are not a minority, I refer you to some sorry Stats, and will every time the finger is pointed at the white oppressors as being the issue.

        1) the fact (2009 from memory) 51 % of NZ male prisoners were Maori despite only making 15% of the population – that switch 51 to 15 is embedded in my mind.

        2) the entitlement or welfare industry, please spend a few days in any winz office, even one on the north shore of Auckland.

        To give some perspective, in the regional city i grew up in (Palm Nth), our Maori neighbors were wonderful, i grew up with those kids, playes sport with them, socialised with them and they went on to become highly succesful people, lawyers and a doctor. They were Maori, but their parents refused to let them get too deep in the moaning, and oppressive culture associated with too many of their people who continue to believe the world, and the NZ government owe them a living. Yes this is a bit OTT, but see the point!

        • Amanda Atkinson

          That is all irrelevant to my point. I happen to agree with yours.

      • Cadwallader

        The most vulnerable and under-represented minority is the human individual. Individuality is colour-blind and by its very nature doesn’t act tribally.

      • Cadwallader

        O/T I bristle with the term “redneck.” it is very much an American label and has as little acceptability here as the term “nigger.” I suspect it means working class American males from rural regions? I truly do not know, other than that it is pejorative.

        • Pharmachick

          “Redneck” originally referred to very, very poor and uneducated farm workers that would get burned on the back of their necks when they worked the fields. It has, in more modern times, still been associated with such (esp. in the American South), but also with willfully ignorant and racist people generally of middle-to-lower socio-economic groups that tend to congregate with same-race (white) people, and enjoy guns, very basic foodstuffs, large gas guzzler type cars etc. The analogy would be “westie” or “bogan” in NZ without necessarily the fondness for black t-shirts and metal music (although that too sometimes).

          • Cadwallader

            Thanks. I take it those who work on oil-rigs in Texas got the label “rough-necks” in a similar manner?

          • Pharmachick

            I think so, yes – but they almost always use Roughneck for drillers. Although I seem to remember my old boss (American) saying something about roughnecks being indigent workers in the 1800s (??).

      • Tom

        You do realise maoris are not indigenous.

      • Wahbonnah

        I’m not a pakeha or a redneck, but a NEW ZEALANDER!!!!

      • steve and monique

        It is rather simple to call people rednecks, racists etc, when someone states any thing against Maori, or any other race. But it is plain and simple, that this treaty has become a burden to the taxpayer of NZ. As for stolen lands, well if we went down the indigenous route, then those first Maori who set foot on this land were no more indigenous then the first European settlers. The first born of both these people are indigenous, hence the ownership issue is moot, as both white, and brown are indigenous now. . Maybe there were indigenous people here before Maori arrived, but due to the nature of the new arrivals, all evidence has been wiped out. Guess it was lucky the next visitors were more tolerant, or we would not be having this conversation.

        • Amanda Atkinson

          Even, if Maori were not first here, they did not sign a treaty with whoever was, and then dishonor it. What is simple, is doing the right thing.

          • steve and monique

            But the problem is, the right thing is never ending. It all needs to stop, and we need to get on with it. Sorry, but it is as simple as that. No amount of money is going to appease Maori, and this continuing saga will be an inheritance our children can not afford. The past is the past, and the only way to move on, is not repeat the same mistakes those before us made, and to forgive, and forget the ones that were made.

          • Amanda Atkinson

            Why are you sorry? It’s your opinion isn’t it? No need to be apologise for it. Thank goodness for our country this line of thought is a minority. Most Kiwis, white and brown, just want the remaining settlements taken be care of, and then we can all move on together. You are putting all Maori in 1 basket. I agree there is a minority of radical Maori who will never be happy. But, you are conveniently ignoring that many tribes have in fact settled, are happy with their settlements, are not asking for more, and are doing some amazing things, with the money. The way to move on, is the clear the decks of these last few settlements. After that, the minority of Maori left still whining and still asking for more, will be seen for exactly what they are. But, they are a minority. I actually think it’s sad that we have people in NZ who assume all Maori think like that.

      • Albert Lane

        You should be aware that the Treaty only applies to Maori people who have firm tribal roots. There are a huge number of urban Maoris who have no idea of their tribal roots, and as a result they receive no assistance from the tribes. There was a High Court challenge to the Treaty in the late 1990’s to have two Auckland maraes recognised as treaty participants so that urban Maoris with no idea of their heritage could be helped. The claim was hotly opposed by the established tribes, and as a result, the claim was lost. One of our biggest mistakes.

    • Tom

      Yup just one more thing, put all beneficiaries on contraception and drug test them weekly. Any drugs, no benefit.

      • Albert Lane

        Absolutely. Gosh, the lawmakers have a bit of work to do. It’s about time the citizens of this country had a say in suggesting new or revised laws, because in the past, nobody has listened to us. WhaleOil. Take a bow. John Key. Take a note.

  • conwaycaptain

    Send KDC home and stop Muslim immigration

    • Phoenician

      If there could be only 2 wishes, they would get my vote!

      • Albert Lane

        Make it 5 wishes. 3. Make the drinking age 20. 4. Re-instate the offence of drunkenness in a public place. 5. Institute severe penalties for assaulting police officers and for verbally abusing police officers in the course of their duty.

  • Agree about the treaty industry- all laws should be colour blind. If there’s one thing I’d really like to see it would be to re-think the roles of local Councils. I think we have a whole industry of petty officials and mayors who are totally out of control across the whole country. Council’s roles should be re-defined to those of providers of essential services only to their communities. Their spending powers should be tightly defined by statute and increases in rates tied to the CPI.

  • Odd Ball

    Sort out Auckland’s council structure & powers, in order to clip the wings of any present & future mayor,

  • Alan

    Look I don’t know how it could be done – but enshrining personal responsiblity within our countries cultre would go a long way. A lot of the problems I see when I look around these days, are symptomatic of this issue.

  • Mike

    Definitely the TOW gravy train.

  • I would like NZ to revoke the right for women to vote.
    Its been down hill ever since they started.

    • ozbob68

      I would like people to have to sit an exam before they can vote. I sat the British Citizenship Exam and voted in the last election there. I want to see those that are level-headed and motivated deciding who runs our country, not the agenda-driven or conspiracy-driven.

      • sandalwood789

        Good idea!

    • pisces8284 .

      You serious?

      • Yep.
        If you get all emotional it scares you.
        But if you think logically it makes sense.
        It did for a few thousand years until the late 19th century and we never had a world war, let alone two of them.

  • unitedtribes

    Ditch MMP

    • Albert Lane

      Absolutely Ditch MMP. The people who thought of it should have had their heads read.

  • Yeahright

    RMA, then a radical change in function. At the moment it is just a revenue gatherer and just stifles progress. protection to the environment is needed but the RMA in its current form just kills progress. Plus its used as a weapon by the greenies for their extreme agenda’s, eg, Miss C.Brown C/- Wellington Council.

  • Dave

    I mentioned this the other night on Backchat. Our Aussie day is a country wide celebration of PRIDE in Australia, entire communities putting 99.99% of everything aside and celebrating what a great country this really is. Sure, there are a few protests etc, but nothing like the greivance industry and whinging about how hard done by the self oppressed maori are.

    I lived in NZ for almost 40 years and was utterly sick and tired of the Maori greivance issues and how hard done by they were, and then being run off a beach in northland, and excluded from going into the TeUrawera national park as I was the wrong colour – yet, we are all equal. Living in NZ, I never ever felt it was one people, and have never ever seen the pride and unity that Australia Day generates.

    NZ, get shot of the treaty NOW, zero entitlements, nothing, no special funding for anything maori, just one set of rules, one equal set of Kiwi’s and all living together in a special corner of the world.

    Come together NZ, Open the maori meeting houses to everyone – cut the bulldust, just get together and have a bbq in the park with neighbours, but all come together and celebrate, no matter what your politics, religion or political leanings.

    http://youtu.be/l1a0RVz2xdY

    NB: Please dont take my word for it, look up Australia day, Google Australia day images etc.

    • I.M Bach

      It’s a great day/weekend. NZ could learn a lot from the Aussies in this respect, it’s all about celebrating the good and forgetting the bad. Unfortunately there are some in NZ who do nothing but drag up the past, whinge about how hard done-by they are and stand there with their hand out wanting to cash in on ‘injustices’ from 200yrs ago. It’s pathetic and annoying.

      • Dave

        The real thing that gets me is the complete contrast, Aussie day is really a day when Aussies party together country wide. PArties, celebrations, BBQ, cricket in the parks, on the beaches and in the outback, all cultures, races and people.

        In contrast, most regard NZ’s day of shame (Waitangi day) as a holiday and avoid any official celebrations due to the whingers and protests. Imagine the possibilities if this one day could change……

        • pak

          Absolutely the point Dave. Loved the selection of pics – especially the sausages on the barbie! There is no equivalent national celebration in N.Z. Have heard the P.M. speak a couple of times about engendering pride in our nation and it seems to me that is part of his thinking behind his wish to change the flag.

          • OneTrack

            So we keep the TOW rort and get a new flag? That’ll work.

          • pak

            I agree TOW is a rort but no idea how you read my comments as suggesting we “keep the TOW and get a new flag”. I didn’t even mention the TOW and nor did the P.M. in his presentations on why he thinks we should change the flag. As I said it was to do with national pride.

        • Reaper

          I think the only way it could work would be to start up something new on a different day. Leave Waitangi Day as it is for the whingers and protests, and have a celebration day at some other time of the year.

          • Albert Lane

            Perhaps we could call that special commemorative day New Zealand Day. Wouldn’t that be a good idea?

          • Dave

            Would love to see something like that Albert, but I fear it would be taken over by the lefties, labour, the unions and maori activists all s reaming to the complicit MSM, oh poor xyz can’t celebrate she doesn’t get enough to liVe on

          • Albert Lane

            I was only being cynical, because Waitangi Day was once called New Zealand Day. I’m not sure who changed it.

    • Albert Lane

      Advance Australia Fair.

  • Eiselmann

    I grew up surrounded by gangs , my fathers partner belonged to a gang family ,every patched member has destroyed someone’s life to get that patch and every prospect knows that they must do the same thing to move forward in the gang system. They control the drug trade and the sex trade. They don’t respect our society , they don’t care about the law of the land , they exist only to better themselves and if you get in the way of their business ,even inadvertently, they will kill, if they have to(and yes I have heard gunfire from my old bedroom and seen someone blown away) .
    Yet we have laws that not only protect this blight on New Zealand we throw money at them…we fund them. Wonder how many gang members would walk around with their patches on if they lost the protection of the laws in society they reject….and here’s the thing it will get worse , When I was 17 there were two roads in my neighbourhood I knew not to walk down, when I was 36 there were only two roads I could walk down in my neighbourhood and even then I had to be wary….If all MP’s had to live in my old neighbourhood for a year , then tough gang laws would be passed in urgency after a week.. So what can we do ….the police almost certainly know who belongs to the gangs locally , so declare them criminal organisations , make it a crime to be in a gang , arrest them , get them off the streets and send them to White Island with no food and water…where they can happily ignore our societies laws and values all they like.

    • I.M Bach

      While I agree with your sentiment I have to say that cleaning up the gangs is a big ask. Even if you, for example, banned back patches, then what? Red bandannas? Blue Bandannas? Club t-shirts? Stickers on cars? There are quite a few motorcycle clubs in NZ that don’t have back patches but because they are motorcycle clubs are they gangs? Are all the patch-wearing club members gangsters? I have never (and will never) wear a back patch so I’m not preaching from the pulpit but it’s a dodgy area to wander into. People have the right to wear what they want. Is a girl in a mini-skirt walking home “asking for it” if she’s sexually assaulted? Some see mini-skirts as provocotive, some see back patches as intimidatory. Can you see the grey area here? I can see your point but it would be a sticky one to take to court, they tried in Wanganui; although I can’t recall the final outcome I do know that one motorcycle club fought it in court, they have the resources.

      • Dave

        Ah, it is happening here in QLD, the anti gang laws are working here despite some claiming the laws are infringing their right to associate.

        Lots of news around the laws, but it is illegal for more of three gang members to associate, meet, even have a coffee together at a cafe. It is working.

        Qld anti-bikie laws include:
        Extra powers for Qld’s Crime and Corruption Commission (CCC)
        Bikie-only prison at Woodford, north of Brisbane
        Mandatory sentences of 15 years for serious crimes committed as part of gang activity, on top of the normal penalty
        Club office bearers will be sentenced to another 10 years in jail, and parole will only be granted if the offender cooperates with police
        Convicted bikies subjected to strict drug tests and searches in prison
        Bikie criminals in other state prisons to be transferred to Woodford
        Introducing a licensing regime for tattoo parlours and artists, banning bikie gang members
        Motorcycles to be crushed as punishment for certain crimes

        http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-03-19/bikies-lodge-high-court-challenge-against-laws/5332316

        • I.M Bach

          I’ve taken a passing interest in that and it’ll be good to see the worst brought to justice. If you don a patch then you take that direction in life and you deal with the consequences. I don’t think it’s worth it myself. Having said that, a lot of gangs don’t have patches and work ‘under the radar’, like Triads and the Mafia. (Although a Caddy limo and a sharp suit is an indicator for the latter usually.) I’m not saying the powers that be shouldn’t try to clean things up, it’s just not going to be easy sorting the middle ground.

          Edit; spelling

        • MAWG

          http://www.widowssonsaz.com/images/gallery/2011/july/flagstaff/image6.jpg

          Would these people be entrapped by such laws? They dress like a motorcycle gang. They ride motorbikes, but they engage in no illegal activities.

          These men have all taken oaths which include obedience to all laws of the land, and a commitment to carrying out charitable works. At first glance they would be indistinguishable from criminal gangs, but these men would be the furthest from a criminal gang as you could get.

          • I.M Bach

            Or even the Blue Knights. The police force’s own motorcycle club.

            http://www.blueknightsaustralia.org/

          • Eiselmann

            I know a couple of widows sons they are like brothers to me , its fair to say that many gang members dress to intimidate , but many people dress in similar ways without belonging to criminal gangs and with no intend to intimidate. As I mention in my wee post/rant the police know who belongs to the criminal gangs.

          • I.M Bach

            And that highlights the importance of ‘local bobbies’, they know who are the troublemakers are in their (for want of a better word) ‘patch’.

          • Dave

            Yes, there is a lot of argument around the gang laws in Australia, even your family man with a japanese or italian bike cannot go for a ride with his mates on similar machines.

          • I.M Bach

            This appears to be the current situation.

      • Eiselmann

        HI I take your point and I know its a big ask , but I’ve seen too much of what Gangs really are about to not want to see them removed from our society… Just those grey areas always seem to work in favour of the bad guys.

        • I.M Bach

          Absoutely, and if anyone were to be convicted of a crime in the course of gaining a patch then the sentence should be much more severe. I have never heard of a motorcycle club requiring anyone do anything illegal to gain entry but things change and I’m no expert, perhaps today they do. I know of non-m/c gangs doing so though.

          • Eiselmann

            The gang I grew up with was mainly Black Power along with some Nomads and had friends who lived in Mongrel Mob territory …later there were kids I’d watched grow up who joined the Killer Bees(as well as more established gangs) …not so much contact with bike gangs as a kid but certainly met a few when I got older. Best advice….avoid.

    • Here’s my idea of a more humane (and realistic) “white island”…

      http://andrewatkin.blogspot.co.nz/2009/06/eco-prisons.html

      • Eiselmann

        Interesting read and some interesting ideas …as you said its probably more realistic than my preferred prison option, however while judges think horrible childhoods are an acceptable excuse for bad choices that hurt innocent others I’m afraid the country isn’t ready for your idea …let alone mine.

    • Albert Lane

      Here’s another thing the Aussies could teach us. Ban the motor-cycle gangs. Easy as that. How come the Aussies are ahead of us in various aspects?

  • pak

    This is an innovative and relaxed way to promote some genuine discussion on issues that matter to people. Good on Act for taking this step. It has already stimulated some very interesting commentary on this site.

  • Hans

    I would like to get rid of the central banksters, I’m sure the Fed in the USA has some influence on them. Not sure why we need a central bank run by crooks.

  • Disinfectant

    Reform the Local Government Act to stop councils running commercial businesses.

  • Huia

    I also would like to see an end to the Treaty issues, they have gone a long way in addressing most of them, but there are still a few to go. Get it over and done with, then NZ can move forward instead of dwelling continually in the past. Of course there are always those who will dwell in the past so the issues will never ever be totally resolved. The costs have cost us all dearly, this country is suffering because of something that happened mostly well before our time through trying to do the right thing.
    I would like to see a halt on immigration for a few years, tighter border controls in place, if you cant abide by our laws then you are gone….no 5th and 6th chances, you have done it in your own nest and your citizenship has been revoked.
    I would like to see beneficiaries made to earn their way in those jobs that migrants are being bought in for, the work is here, if they wont work…no benefit. If you have a second child whilst on a benefit then you are earning too much on that benefit if you can afford to breed.
    I would like to see people being made responsible for their own children instead of the PC brigade stepping in and taking over the parents responsibility. How will these people get it through their heads that children are their responsibility if a do gooder is waiting in the wings to earn their place in heaven. Tough love…you are responsible for your own actions. That is how you learn. We live in a great place where the opportunity to eat very well is here, we can grow pretty much anything and can eat very healthy. There is no excuse not to, so the answer is laziness and the knowledge that someone else will put it right for you. Get off your bum and work.
    I would like to see tougher sentencing where life meant life and you pay dearly for the crime you have committed, especially against children. I never want to see another murder trial controlled, manipulated and played out in the media by the likes of team Bain. The Bain trial was a complete travesty of justice and should never be allowed to happen like that again. Facts are facts, innuendo, gossip and hearsay have no place in a court room and should never have been allowed to be presented as facts…totally screwed the trial and cost the taxpayer dearly. The Justice system really does need an overhaul, especially when you get a lying, cheating, German criminal tie up the courts with his antics,(the cost is enormous), then to get an MP released from his position on a criminal’s and his paid retainer’s word alone…something very wrong there.
    I am really tired of the left and media banging on so negatively when we live in such a great place, so would love to see them actually be positive, show some guts and get out from under the union umbrella, this would probably earn them more votes from everyone for a start. For God’s sake stop being so dammed negative, its draining on the mind.
    I would definitely like to see MMP gone and the time wasting in Parliament reduced.
    I am not happy with the movement onto the gravy train of local councils by the left wing, they are anti progress, negative, ineffective and not in the least business minded, so how can they run a council?….they cant ! as we have seen by Auckland’s pathetic example. These people cannot run business’s, so councils please stop dabbling in the business world, concentrate on running the council and only the councils, if you want to dabble in business then save up and purchase your own and stop misusing the ratepayers hard earned money.
    I would like to see our defense force increased to cover the air again, and given the balls to act like they should act in defending our country, its waters and our laws. Again if you cant abide by our laws then you are gone, fair means or foul. We really need to take stock about this and recognize where the world is going at the moment, there is a move afoot which will hurt all of us, therefore we need some protection and the confidence our shores will be taken care of.
    I think we need to stop importing useless crap from China, a stupid $1.50 toy which breaks as soon as you get it home leaves a huge carbon footprint, surely we can do better than this. Why this desperation for garbage?
    Id like to see our education system improved, teachers paid what they are truly worth. Not all teachers…just the good ones doing a good job, which means we need to screen teachers and make sure they are well educated, dedicated enough to really want to teach our children, and not just fall into the job because it seems to be the easiest one around. Id like to see children’s education taking in the movement of money (international and domestic), in depth budgeting, property purchasing. Sex education hasn’t worked as the kids are still getting pregnant only in bigger numbers. They are active earlier too which is a worry. I think the schools should concentrate on sending better balanced, better educated in the ways of the world kid’s out into the world. No pregnant and illiterate as so many of them are now.
    I would also like to see the sale of massive tracts of land in NZ to people living overseas be stopped. No good for us and no good for anyone except the overseas owner. The Chinese are buying up large land tracts in the food baskets of the world, do you think they will share with us if things get tight? I don’t have that confidence. You go to their country, try to buy a large tract of land, it wont happen. I believe we need to hang on to our land. Large tracts can surely be broken up into smaller tracts and farmed successfully for kiwi’s by kiwi’s.
    Will get off the soap box now but thanks for the vent.

    • pak

      Excellent vent covers just about everything. Should send to David Seymour, might earn you $500!

    • Wahbonnah

      Brilliiant!!!

      Cam should give you a monthly post, and call it something like “Huia’s Howler!!!”

      • Huia

        I’m just a grumpy old tart who needs to vent about things every once in awhile.

    • Albert Lane

      Your wishes almost exactly mirror my own. But I would add one more. I think our councils should have a look at the Aussies and see how they manage their rubbish (not the rubbish people, but the garbage rubbish). Aussies encourage recycling. We only pay lip-service to it. In Australia, I can take a huge load of cardboard to the tip, and we can put it directly into a big bin for no charge. In New Zealand I took a cardboard carton full of paper and cardboard scraps to the tip, as I was going to be away for a while, and would miss the collection. The guy running our local tip wanted $7 to take the carton, and when I refused, and put the carton back in the car, I received torrents of abuse. In Australia, anything of any value or use that you take to the tip, is taken without charge, and metals are kept in one area, building equipment in another area, and domestic items in another area. You can go to the tip and pay a small amount for useful items you want. Your motor mower frame has rusted out? You can buy a replacement at the tip for a few bucks. You can take garden and tree scraps to the tip, also for nothing, and it will be mulched. And in my council area, each house gets two free tipping vouchers per year for a trailer-load. Each house gets a red-top bin for the weekly garbage collection, and a large yellow top bin for recyclables. Where we live in the Auckand area, we get a little open-topped bin for plastic and glass. Yes. The Aussies can teach us quite a bit about recycling. Whenever anybody tells me that NZ is clean and green, I wince.

      • I.M Bach

        You’re right; recycling needs re-investigating. I can recall some years ago a tv crew following a recycling truck and recording the load going straight into the landfill. I’d be really keen to slip a few GPS devices into some recycling bins around the country to see where the contents actually end up.

        • Albert Lane

          It doesn’t surprise me at all. At our tip in NSW, we even had a bin for coloured glass. We had a paper mill in the district, and it wouldn’t have surprised me if all the scrap paper and cardboard went there. I was very impressed by our rubbish service. I used to go to the tip a lot, as our business created a lot of paper waste, and when we renovated our old house I was able to buy all sorts of items very cheaply, including doors, windows, bricks, pavers that people had left at the tip. And I think the old Victa mower with the undamaged body cost me $10. So is NZ clean and green? From my experiences in the Auckland area, and at the local tip, NZ is a long way behind. I sincerely hope that somebody with a bit of vision and authority will read these comments and do something about them. It’s great to have a forum where such things can be discussed. It will be even greater if they are read by the right people, and something positive happens.

    • I.M Bach

      You make some very good points although you’ve doubled the allowable word count. Trim it down and enter.

  • ozbob68

    In five words: One New Zealand, No Dickheads.

  • GoingRight

    I would like to see the unions disappear.

  • Pharmachick

    Abolish Tall Poppy Syndrome (but I don’t now how you’d effect that).

    EDIT: I take it back – what Steve and Monique said.

  • Wallace Westland

    I’d like to see the end of the Super city…how would that go down at ACT’s conference?

  • sandalwood789

    Legally define Islam as an ideology of hate and then use that law to ban Muslim immigration.
    Use the law again to close mosques and Islamic schools and ban proselytising by Muslims.

    No more Treaty payments and that includes the top-up rort that at least one iwi wangled out of the Crown.

    Go back to a FPP electoral system.

  • Sailor Sam

    Get rid of the “maori” seats in parliament, dismantle the “treaty” gravy train.
    Any of the “part” maori who do not like this, go home to Hawaiiki.

  • Wahbonnah

    lower tax on alcohol!!!!

  • Ali Gates

    Introduce after 6 months of unemployment benefits work for the dole and ensure equal student benefits not getting paid a student allowance because you have a rich mommy or daddy is unfair

  • twr

    I’m pretty sure Act would fall over themselves to have you speak at their conference. You have a readership far greater than their vote last election, and it would get lapped up by the media.

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