Little keen to learn from Australian Labor party resurgence


Labour Leader Andrew Little (borrowing David Cunliffe’s tie)


The New Zealand Labour Party says it will be talking to its counterpart in Australia after its incredible comeback in the Queensland state elections.

The Australian Labor Party is on track to claim 45 or 46 of the 89 seats in the state’s parliament, after going into the poll holding only nine seats.

It is a major blow for Queensland’s ruling Liberal National Party, and a reflection of the unpopularity of the country’s Prime Minister Tony Abbott.

New Zealand Labour Party leader Andrew Little said the result is encouraging but it would not necessarily be reflected here.

He said that was because the issues which contributed to the result were unique to Queensland, and New Zealand is still three years out from an election

Yes.   If only Labour could create some kind of situation unique to New Zealand, some kind of scandal that Labour could expose about National, something dirty…

The thing is, if New Zealanders had the choice, they would probably put the Australian Labour Party in charge ahead of Angry Andy’s Little Labour.

Still.  If we’re talking about Labour learning things from Labor, they should have a long hard look at the union corruption interfering in and with Australian politics.



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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.