April 2015

Thursday nightCap

Time travel? No problem

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Today’s Trivia

via scifinow.co.uk

via scifinow.co.uk

 

Welcome to Daily Trivia. There is a game to play here. The photo above relates to one of the items below. The first reader to correctly tell us in the comments what item the photo belongs to, and why, gets bragging rights. Sometimes they are obvious, other times the obvious answer is the decoy. Can you figure it out tonight?

 

Don’t get ‘magazine’ and ‘clip’ mixed up when you’re talking guns: they’re different things. (source)

 

Read more »

Map of the Day, proofer, emergency fixer upper

Don’t make it mad. You won’t like it when it’s mad

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3CVbcEEAG5E

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Report from the front line: South Korean toilet

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Daily Roundup

Another dumb politicians lets media take photos of him eating…
…oh wait… its Key again

qweqweeqwqweqw
Dirty Media Party continue the cheap hits.  (Take a bow Andrea Vance.  Stellar work – worthy of Journalist of the Year for sure).

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Whaleoil Backchat

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Len Brown and Michael Cullen will share the same legacy

I have spent quite a bit of time lately thinking about autonomous cars, and I wanted to summarize my current thoughts and predictions. Most people – experts included – seem to think that the transition to driverless vehicles will come slowly over the coming few decades, and that large hurdles exist for widespread adoption. I believe that this is significant underestimation. Autonomous cars will be commonplace by 2025 and have a near monopoly by 2030, and the sweeping change they bring will eclipse every other innovation our society has experienced.

Is this the time to invest in rail then?

They will cause unprecedented job loss and a fundamental restructuring of our economy, solve large portions of our environmental problems, prevent tens of thousands of deaths per year, save millions of hours with increased productivity, and create entire new industries that we cannot even imagine from our current vantage point.

The transition is already beginning to happen. Elon Musk, Tesla Motor’s CEO, says that their 2015 models will be able to self-drive 90 percent of the time.1 And the major automakers aren’t far behind – according to Bloomberg News, GM’s 2017 models will feature “technology that takes control of steering, acceleration and braking at highway speeds of 70 miles per hour or in stop-and-go congested traffic.”2 Both Google3 and Tesla4 predict that fully-autonomous cars – what Musk describes as “true autonomous driving where you could literally get in the car, go to sleep and wake up at your destination” – will be available to the public by 2020.

Oh bugger.  And we’ve got visionaries that want to pour billions into rail.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Tax fraud

There’ll be lots of outrage from the Left today when Alex Swney gets sentenced for tax fraud. So readers might find this interesting:

Wellington accountant sentenced on tax fraud charges
27 February 2009

A Wellington accountant and tax agent has been sentenced to six months home detention on tax fraud charges involving $183,155.

Graham Edward McCready was sentenced today in the Wellington District Court by Judge Behrens after earlier admitting 12 charges of providing false GST and income tax returns.

Inland Revenue Acting Group Manager, Assurance, Graham Tubb, said McCready abused his position and betrayed the trust of his clients.

“McCready deliberately set out to try to cheat the system for his own personal gain. Both Inland Revenue and the courts both take a very dim view of this sort of action.”

“Our tax system relies on the honesty of the many professionals working in it, and both Inland Revenue and the public expect them to help uphold its integrity,” said Mr Tubb.

Here’s where there similarities really hit home though:   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Rape cultures. Time for perspective.

Caution, this is a tough topic.

A Chechen ISIL militant ‘cleaned’ 19-year-old Dalia with petrol before raping her…

They were kidnapped, sold as sex slaves and raped for months at the hands of Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) militants.

Hundreds of them managed to reach safety in the territory of Iraq’s Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), either by escaping from ISIL by themselves or by the help of their relatives who paid a ransom.

Let’s meet some of these young women.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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