Busting the Syrian Drought Myth

The left wing and other idiots like Prince Charles have been telling us that the problems in Syria are because of climate change and that if it wasn’t for a terrible ostensibly Western induced drought caused by climate change Daesh wouldn’t exist.

Well all of that is bull-dust as James Delingpole explains.

Numerous significant thinkers from Pulitzer prizewinning journalist Thomas Friedman to the Prince of Wales to  ex-choral-jailbait-nymphet Charlotte Church have been promoting the theory that the current troubles in Syria are the result of a drought caused by ‘climate change’.

It’s an easy mistake to have made.  Often when people are short of food and water their natural instinct is to strap on a suicide vest, pick up a Kalashnikov and drive to Paris in order to kill a few hundred people as an important gesture designed to raise public awareness of the urgent need to reduce anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions before someone gets hurt.

But in this case, Friedman, the Prince of Wales, Charlotte Church – and also Graham Linehan, the Irish scriptwriter of the brilliant comedy series Father Ted – are wrong in their assumption.

We know this because of a stubborn fact called meteorological evidence.

As Roger Andrews demonstrates here in great detail the “drought” that supposedlyravaged Syria between 2006 and 2011 and drove thousands of ordinary Syrians into the arms of ISIS and Al Qaeda never actually happened.   

Take Aleppo – where, according to the “drought” theory, conditions got so bad that thousands were driven off the land:

Last January, it was reported that crop failures ….. just in the farming villages around the city of Aleppo, had led 200,000 rural villagers to leave for the cities.

Maybe. But here’s the problem with that theory: there was no drought in Aleppo.

Average annual rainfall during the 2006-2011 period was only 9% lower than average annual rainfall over the preceding 55 years. The driest year during the period (2011) was only the seventh driest on record and 2006-2011 was only the 13th driest six-year period on record. Clearly the crop failures in the farming villages around Aleppo – which undoubtedly occurred – weren’t caused by a drought of Biblical proportions. In fact there doesn’t seem to have been a drought at Aleppo at all.

Yes, in some parts of Syria it’s true there were much greater falls in average annual rainfall. But not in any of the main crop-growing areas.

Average rainfall over 2006-2011 was below the pre-2006 average at four stations (Deir Ezzor -31%, Palmyra -22%, Lattakia -17% and Aleppo -9% as already discussed ) but above it at three (Kamishli +3%, Damascus +5% and Hama +15%). The average for all seven stations was 7% below the pre-2006 average, decreasing to 4% when only the five “cropland” stations (Lattakia, Aleppo, Kamishi, Hama and Damascus) are considered.

So, to repeat, the 2006 to 2011 drought which experts like the Prince of Wales are citing in support of their “climate change” causes terrorism thesis did not exist.

More lies to make us feel guilty that these idiots are intent on killing themselves and the West…or the terrible Jews must be to blame.

Here’s the thing, last year I was on the Syrian border in the Golan Heights looking out over Syria. On the Israeli side of the border it was lush, green and farmers were working the fields. 200 metres away was dirt, and nothing but dirt…on the Syrian side. Of course one side of the border has a stable, accepting, democratic government that doesn’t discriminate on the basis of sexual preference, gender, race or religion, and on the Syrian side a government that is ruled by a despot and an opposition that is fragmented and mostly Islamic and intent on jihad. Don’t believe me then take a look at Google Earth.

Golan

Isn’t strange how the “drought” seems to follow the border.

Climate Change caused the Syrian conflict…pull the other one.

 

– Breitbart


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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