Charter Schools do better with the kids the policy is aimed at

In New Zealand the Charter School policy is aimed at helping the long tail which is predominantly made up of Maori and Pasifika students – more typically in lower socioeconomic situations.

The NY Times has this kind of thing to say about the effects of Charter Schools for this type of group:

Charter schools are controversial. But are they good for education? Rigorous research suggests that the answer is yes for an important, underserved group: low-income, nonwhite students in urban areas. These children tend to do better if enrolled in charter schools instead of traditional public schools.

A consistent pattern has emerged from this research. In urban areas, where students are overwhelmingly low-achieving, poor and nonwhite, charter schools tend to do better than other public schools in improving student achievement.

Charter schools in Boston produced huge gains in test scores. A majority of students at Boston’s charters are African-American and poor. Their score gains are large enough to reduce the black-white score gap in Boston’s middle schools by two-thirds. Boston’s charters also do a better job at preparing students for college.

Clearly progress is being made in New Zealand with nine Charters now operating, 25 applicants in for the new round and South Auckland Middle School given the green light to expand numbers while operating the model that is also in place at Middle School West Auckland.

Clearly the “failed model” mantra from opponents is simply nonsense.

If such progress is possible with children traditionally failed by the system – why are there any opponents at all and what motivates them?

 – NY Times


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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