Cry Baby of the Week

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Some people really need to learn to shut their gobs instead of running off to the Media Party and crying a river of tears about their self-inflicted predicament.

A family ripped apart after a relative was deported from New Zealand says Australia is not the only country treating people inhumanely.

South African-born accountant Gavin Jardine was kicked out of the country in September after serving more than three years in prison for stealing $380,000 from his employer.

A New Zealand resident since May 2008, Jardine appealed his deportation on the grounds his wife and children, who were oblivious to his offending, were settled in the country.

But his appeal was dismissed by the Immigration and Protection Tribunal, who said the Jardine family’s circumstances were “not exceptional” and they could keep in touch through the phone and internet.

Kiwis being sent home after committing crimes in Australia have been making headlines, but scores of people are kicked out of New Zealand as well each year.

Figures provided under the Official Information Act show that 447 people from 54 different countries were deported after committing a crime between 2010 and August this year.

Ripped apart? And it is all the uncaring Immigration department’s fault and, I suppose, a heartless government.

What a load of cobblers.

This ratbag is a fraudster. He stole $380,000 from his employer. Then he tried to hide behind the skirts of his missus.

When that failed he ran to the Media Party who obliged with a cry baby story.

Jardine said the family had been treated terribly once they lost their appeal, from conflicting information to what luggage he could take.

Being separated from his wife and children was horrible, but knowing they were struggling and being unable to help was hard to deal with.

“The worst thing is I know they’re suffering, they’re battling. She’s (my wife) running around 24/7 trying to run a house and keep food on the table. When she texts me and gets hold of me here and she’s frustrated…there’s nothing you can do so you get very frustrated, very very bitter.”

While he understood some people would have little sympathy after he had committed a crime, he believed he had served his sentence.

“It is actually a double consequence. The consequence should have been deported, not sent to jail and then deported. I feel like I’ve been punished twice.”

Jardine’s wife Carol has remained in New Zealand following her husband’s deportation along with their two sons.

While standing by her husband, she has established a life and business in New Zealand and is unsure what to do.

Immigration NZ’s decision to deport Gavin “ripped the family apart”.

“I don’t think people realise just how huge an effect it does have on a family, it’s enormous.

“It’s all very well people saying ‘he committed a crime, he has to pay”…yes he committed a crime and yes he has to pay but us as a family, the children and I, we’re paying a huge price and we did nothing wrong.”

The Media Party are trying to liken this to the Aussie situation, and in doing so have highlighted the pleasing policy of exporting ratbags who commit crimes in this country.

He should have thought about the consequences when he brought a company to its knees with his offending.

Speaking of his offending…you’d think that a case where he had defrauded his employer of $380,000 would make news wouldn’t you. The thing is it doesn’t Google. But his appeal to Immigration does and that makes interesting reading.

He arrived in NZ in 2008 and began his offending almost immediately.

[5] The appellant came to New Zealand in May 2008, aged 50 years. His family joined him over the course of the following year. He held a visitor visa valid to November 2008. He then held a work visa valid to May 2010. In June 2008, he began working for a computing company, first as an accountant and later as its financial controller.

[6] In October 2008, the appellant applied for residence under the Skilled Migrant category, based on his experience as an accountant. His wife and three children were included as applicants. The application was approved in February 2009.

[7] In March 2011, the appellant and his family were granted permanent resident visas.

[8] The appellant has travelled out of New Zealand, for up to two weeks at a time, on nine occasions since his first arrival in 2008. These trips were to South Africa (four times), Australia (four times) and the United Kingdom (once).

[9] Between September 2008 and March 2011, on 97 occasions, the appellant transferred funds totalling $273,336.52 from his firm’s bank accounts to his personal account. Between March 2010 and January 2011, on 17 occasions, he transferred $67,870.06 from his employing firm’s bank accounts to his own business account. He also transferred $77,675 from his business account to his personal account. The total amount stolen from his employing firm’s account was around $380,000.

[10] In 2011, the appellant left his employing firm and he and his wife operated a business. In 2012, he was appointed as the accountant of a firm and remained there to the end of 2013.

[11] In April 2014, the appellant was convicted of having gained access to a computer system for a dishonest purpose, without claim of right, to obtain a pecuniary advantage (maximum penalty: seven years’ imprisonment). He was sentenced on four representative charges, to three years and eight months’ imprisonment on each charge, to be served concurrently. He is at present still in prison.

[12] On 13 January 2015, the appellant was served with a Deportation Liability Notice. This was on the grounds that he was convicted of offences for which the court has the power to impose imprisonment of three months or more; certain of the offences were committed when he held a temporary entry class visa; and other offences were committed not later than two years after he first held a residence class visa.

He arrived in May 2008 and started offending on September 2008.

On that basis alone it is best he was exported back to his home country.

He really shouldn’t be crying a river of tears to the media though.

I’m still perplexed as to why there is no news regarding his conviction. It was a large sum of money and others have appeared in the news for less.

 

– Fairfax


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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