Gunshop owner wants restrictions on private sales so he can benefit

Apparently private gun sales are a problem…so says a gun shop owner.

Gun shop owners in Dunedin say the private sale of firearms in Dunedin is ”thriving” and tougher restrictions need to be introduced to try to combat the problem.

There are ”approximately” 35,000 gun licence-holders in the Southern District, according to Dunedin police.

Centrefire McCarthy’s Streamand Field Store managing director Selwyn Shanks said since the registration of individual guns was revoked in 1984, many people had chosen to trade guns privately as they could make more money – and the internet was adding fuel to the fire.

”If you bring your dad’s old gun in to me to sell and I offer you $250 for it, but someone down the pub without a licence offers you $300, you’re going to go with the better offer,” he said.

”Otago is a rural area so there is a lot of informal trading and sale between farmers. We have no idea how many guns are out there, or if the people who have them know how to use them.”

Right, so he uses an already illegal example to reinforce his views that guns should only be sold through shops and the law needs tightening. The example he uses is already against the law…selling to unlicensed people…and any toughening up of the law wouldn’t stop that.

Private gun sales are legal as long as you follow the law. This guy is trying to stop that because he will personally benefit.

Then they ask a womble academic…and he says:

The National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies chairman and director Prof Kevin Clements said there were 230,000 registered gun owners in New Zealand – but an estimated 1.1 to 1.2 million firearms. He agreed the black market in gun trading could be ”thriving” in Dunedin and Otago because of the rural make-up of the community, and the strong interest in hunting.

”We do not know how many guns each registered gun owner possesses,” Prof Clements said.

”Some must have mini arsenals while others will just have one weapon. Not knowing who owns these weapons is a major problem.”

What problem? Owners are licensed…it matters not how many firearms they have. Since Aramoana there has only been one mass killing, and he was under the care of Capital & Coast’s community mental health team in Wellington after being diagnosed two years earlier as a paranoid schizophrenic. He had also resisted taking his medication. Irrespective of those two events in 22 years, the law is working. But note the language…”the black market in gun trading could be ”thriving””…could be…so no evidence then, just agreeing because guns are bad right?

And then another vested interest comments…but this one is too gutless to put his name to his comments.

One gun retailer in Dunedin, who did not wish to be named, said even though he was in the business of selling guns and ”business was good”, he believed every gun in New Zealand should be individually registered and a gun amnesty – where unlicensed gun owners surrender guns without repercussions – ”couldn’t hurt”.

”Private gun sales are a huge problem,” he said.

”Over the internet, or a mate talking to a mate down at the pub, nine times out of 10 they won’t ask to see a gun licence. And when someone messes up we all cop the flak.

”If things are going to get sold on Trade Me you should have to go to your local gun shop to pick up the gun, and the owner will then sight your licence, or [go to] the police station to uplift it. But the cops don’t want to know. If a gun shop is doing their job they won’t buy a gun unless they sight the owner’s gun licence, but many don’t bother because there is money to be made.”

Private gun sales a huge problem? What rubbish. The problem is law breakers not private gun sales. And there are already penalties.

These guys are manufacturing a problem so they can privately benefit.

 

– Otago Daily Times


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

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