Susan Devoy is pushing to remove “Christmas” from public language

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Oh for Christ’s sake… the Barbarians are indeed inside the gates.  And they are us.

A leading Auckland migrant settlement agency is avoiding the word Christmas and will instead be talking about “happy holidays” and “season’s greetings”.

The Auckland Regional Migrant Services (Arms) says it has taken the move so non-Christians and those who do not celebrate Christmas do not feel excluded.

To be multiculturally sensitive, instead of calling its year-end get-together a Christmas lunch, it’s a “festive lunch”.

An opponent has called the avoidance of references to Christmas a bridge too far, but the agency has the backing of Human Rights Commissioner Susan Devoy.

Dame Susan, who is also the agency’s patron, said references to Christmas were not banned at the agency but the terminology it used aimed at being inclusive.

“The lunch you refer to has always been called a festive lunch.

“Arms works hard to include peoples from all faiths to work together in peace and diversity,” Dame Susan said.

“Arms uses language that will encompass and include everyone; it is not designed to exclude anyone.”

You know, I could accept this if it wasn’t for one clear difference.

Christians are to hand over everything, so it will not offend others.

While others get to fully celebrate their days and rituals because of diversity and tolerance.

Oh.   My.   God.

We are being nobbled from within.   The enemy is us.   It’s our own people that are allowing this to happen.

The number of Christians in New Zealand has been declining, from 55.6 per cent of the population in 2006 to 48.9 per cent in 2013.

However, AUT Professor of Diversity Edwina Pio said expunging Christmas by New Zealand organisations “is a bridge too far”.

“I would strongly urge organisations to display their respect, not by erasing the word Christmas, but by being more inclusive so that they keep Happy Christmas, but then also remember to wish individuals for Diwali, Eid Mubarak, Buddha Purnima, Happy Hanukkah and other faith-based festivals,” she said.

“I think New Zealand often bends over backwards in their aim not to offend minorities in terms of terminology.

“Erasure does not mean equality. In fact, erasure does not show respect for the heterogeneity that is New Zealand.”

This is how it starts people.

We invite them to come live here and become New Zealanders.    Instead, they come here and try to erase what we are about.

Worse, they aren’t actually offended about Christmas.  Are you offended by Hanukkah, or Diwali?  Of course not.

So where is this alleged offence coming from?

From our own people pandering to the needs of minorities and selling out our birthright.

Susan Devoy and people like her are treasonous, and they think they’re doing the right thing.  This is what makes them so dangerous.  They are true believers in the concept that our culture is less important than those we invited to become one of us.

It can never be the right thing to erase something from language and society just because it may offend someone.

First it is organisations, then it will be schools, councils, and before you know it, there will be enclaves of New Zealand where Christmas no longer exists at all.

THESE are the very few steps we take, the apparently innocuous ones, the kind ones, the tolerant ones, the “obviously harmless” ones that end up with this country tearing itself apart.

I don’t CARE what people next door believe in or celebrate.  That’s absolutely fine with me.  But to have a race relations conciliator saying that I must now tone down my OWN way off life lest it offends those that came her to join OUR way of life is not on.

 

 

– Lincoln Tan, NZ Herald


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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