The Cinderella Effect or as I like to call it ‘SOCKS’

Fairfax has an article about ‘The Cinderella Effect’….I call it ‘SOCKS’ [Some Other C*nt’s Kid Syndrome].

It is the same thing. Basically feral scumbags killing off the offspring of the previous sperm donor.

Evolutionists trying to understand why stepdads kill at a disproportionate rate say the ‘evil’ step-parent is no fairytale – but a killer instinct borne of resentment at nurturing someone else’s genepool. Others say it’s not so simple. Talia Shadwell reports as part of Stuff’s Faces of Innocents series.

James Whakaruru, Coral-Ellen Burrows, Saliel Aplin and Olympia Jetson’s names are marks on a long and sorry rollcall of children brutally slain by their stepfathers.

A provocative theory applied to New Zealand’s figures for the first time to explain why a violent few fatally batter their partners’ small children – yet spare their own-  suggests it’s not just that they are mad, bad or sad.

The so-called “Cinderella effect” says humans are not biologically programmed to raise other people’s offspring.

And in feral households they just do what tom-cats do…kill off the other tom-cat’s offspring.

Why stepfathers kill their lovers’ small children but spare their own has troubled Canadian evolutionary psychologist Martin Daly for decades.

He and his late wife Margo Wilson founded the Cinderella theory in the 1980s, researching the deaths of 700 Canadian children.

What they found suggested the unconditional love a parent feels for a screaming child who has soiled their nappy, is not innate for a stepparent – and makes them more likely to lash out.

The Cinderella theory excluded adoptive or foster parents, as they had invited the child into their homes, unlike step-parents who found their new wards part of the romance package.

Building on Darwin’s theory of evolution, the relationship between the new man on the scene and his lover’s child is forged by biological altruism, Daly and Wilson found.

That means humans, like other animals, are programmed to investing their time into reproducing their own genes – not someone else’s – and sometimes that resentment becomes deadly.

But as the children grew older, and the step parents invested more time in the bond, fewer killed, Daly and Wilson found.

“We’ve got a phenomenon – and it’s the same with animals, such as with birds – where a mother is abandoned and someone steps in, in a parenting role,” he explained, from McMaster University in Canada.

“My argument, in psychology – and it’s the same with those other animals who engage in step-parenting – is the step-parent is doing it as a courting step.

“People love their own children more than they love someone else’s child. That’s not to say they don’t love them… [but] generally, they’re not going to throw themselves in front of a truck for them.”

In the Canadian research, birth parents overwhelmingly smothered or shot their children, and a third of fathers committed murder-suicide.

Stepfathers usually beat children to death and just 1 in 67 killed themselves too, Daly and Wilson found.

Not very nice statistics…and each of those statistics is a dead innocent child.

No one really knows what triggers the killers…and there is a risk of stigmatising the plenty of good step-dads out there raising kids in safety. But the fact remains, there are killers and SOCKS is real.

 

– Fairfax


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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