If you are serious Lizzie, then name them

Lizzie Marvelly has a shabby column in the NZ Herald that she claims sheds light on sexual abuse in the music industry.

She is also pimping it via Facebook.

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She is being lauded as brave, as well she might be, but not for her shabby hit piece where she doesn’t name a single one of her alleged abusers.

Apparently, we must all take a stand against the gropers and the philanderers:

The stories I’ve shared here are just a selection of the incidents I’ve either experienced or witnessed over my decade in the industry. Writing this, I was reminded of things that I’d repressed. Incidents I’d completely forgotten about. Like being groped on stage at age 19.

Before now I worried that I’d never work again if I dared to speak about the sexual abuse that I’d endured, largely at the hands of powerful older men who had the means to make life difficult for me.

When you’ve been treated like a profit-generating object, styled and moulded to become a brand, it takes some time to realise that you were a person, a young person, who was mistreated by people who should’ve known better.   

But now, I have control over my career and a life outside the music industry. Speaking about these things still means risking relationships with friends and colleagues, but staying quiet means being complicit in the disgusting behaviour that helped to inform my decision to take a step back from an industry I love.

Nothing quite prepares you for the guilt you feel when you decide to keep quiet about what a colleague did to you, and then hear that they’ve since done the same thing (or worse) to another younger woman. Watching other women walking the same tightrope, I realised that while I’ve broken free of the shackles that bought my silence, others are still trapped. Why?

Statistically, the industry is still dominated by men.

Men decide whether or not your song gets played on radio. They decide whether they’ll promote your tour. They decide who gets a record deal, who plays a festival, and even who receives a New Zealand On Air grant.

Over the last five rounds of music funding, only eight women have served on the panel tasked with deciding which songs to fund. Compared to 21 men.

And even when women do call the shots, as a woman in the industry it’s hard to speak up.

Especially when the people doing the abusing are your friends. It’s much easier to stay quiet. I know. I’ve kept my mouth shut for years.

But that culture of silence enables abusers to prey on their victims with impunity.

Enough is enough. It’s time for us to say, loud and clear, this has to stop.

 It won’t stop, Lizzie dear, if people like you don’t actually name the perpetrators of the sleaze and sexual abuse. Your cute phrases and little brackets indicating the anonymous groper is married don’t achieve anything.

 How many Police complaints have you laid?

How many complaints to the organisations they represent have you made?

The sisterhood may have anointed you for your bravery in speaking out, but you haven’t really done anything other than smear a whole lot of people in the music industry with your claims and innuendo.

If she was serious about stopping the sexual abuse in the industry she’d name them all. She has maintained the culture of silence and, worse, waited until she made the determination for herself that she was now untouchable and so could smear away with impunity.

But now, I have control over my career and a life outside the music industry. Speaking about these things still means risking relationships with friends and colleagues, but staying quiet means being complicit in the disgusting behaviour that helped to inform my decision to take a step back from an industry I love.

Name them Lizzie. Stop being sanctimonious and partially silent. Name them and truly make a stand that this has to stop.

Name them. How brave are you? Brave enough to risk a law suit?

If she doesn’t name them then this column will be forgotten in as much time as it takes the Herald to find another Instagram shot of Kim Kardashian’s arse or Miley Cyrus partially naked somewhere.

 

– NZ Herald


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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