It isn’t a business if it needs more government money

The sad face of a bludger looking to bludge some more but has been told no

The sad face of a bludger looking to bludge some more but has been told no

Some people really have an entitlement mentality.

A Southland woman who has received financial assistance from the Government to start a business has accused it of “dropping the ball” just as she is getting established.

The woman, Jill Bradshaw, says she will have to close her business unless the Government continues to support her.

However, the Ministry of Social Development says Bradshaw has received the maximum funding available for her business and there is now an expectation it be sustainable.

Bradshaw said if the Government did not continue to support her, the approximately $50,000 of government assistance she had received over the last few years would be wasted.

The road to starting her own business began several years ago when Bradshaw was working in a furniture shop.

It isn’t her own business…it is funded and subsidised by the government.  

She said she was unhappy with the work, went on the unemployment benefit and told Work and Income of her plans to start her own business making and selling cushions.

She used her unemployment benefit money to buy materials and make cushions before selling them wholesale, she said.

“They supported me over a two year period with the unemployment benefit and didn’t ask me to look for other work because they knew I was working towards my own self employment,” Bradshaw said.

Last year she decided to investigate opening her own store in the Invercargill CBD.

She applied for a grant, which the Government offered to support people into their own businesses, and was accepted for the grant after submitting  a business plan.

I bet that was a work of fiction.

Bradshaw said she received $10,000 to set up her shop, called Lily and Cedric Designer Cushions in Invercargill’s Dee St, and the remaining $13,000 was paid to her in monthly instalments for wages over an eight month period while she tried to get the business turning a profit.

However, she failed to turn a profit and asked Work and Income if she could go back onto the unemployment benefit while continuing to run her shop, she said.

She believed she needed ongoing support for another 6-12 months before her business became self sufficient.

“I think it takes that long for a business to get noticed,” Bradshaw said.

Her business was now at a pivotal point where she could cover expenses, but not support herself; she needed a bit more time to turn a profit, she said.

She said Work and Incone agreed to put her back on the unemployment benefit while she ran her shop, but told her she had to be available for fulltime work.

She was unimpressed, saying it was both ridiculous and impractical because no one would employ her while she was running a business.

As a taxpayer I’m unimpressed. This woman is just bludging in a  different way, but it is bludging nonetheless.

What has got me stuffed is why the Media party always pimp these stories to the public. The government shouldn’t be paying a cent towards subsidising  her business.

Hell’s teeth, perhaps I could do the same for my business. Get the dole to blog…hey it’s still not paying off, give me more dole.

The outrage here is that she thinks we as taxpayers should continue to provide her with a business that clearly doesn’t work, doesn’t pay and I bet is also behind on GST and PAYE payments.

 

– Fairfax


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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