Maybe Andrew Little can send our curry chefs to England


David and Samantha Cameron enjoy a curry. They tucked into chicken korai and saag paneer at Manchester’s Saffron Lounge during the Conservative party conference in October – it wasn’t quite as spicy as the chilli-hot specials they ordered at the Paprika Indian restaurant in Birmingham the previous year.

The prime minister even pledged to protect the struggling £4.2bn curry industry, which employs 100,000 people, at the British Curry awards in 2013. He said he would “get the skilled Asian chefs you need” to the UK, while the home secretary, Theresa May, has admitted that curry chefs are a shortage occupation.

This shortage has been caused by increasingly tough immigration rules, so that restaurants are unable to hire the skilled chefs they need. This makes it difficult for these businesses to grow, while restaurants are unable to provide adequate customer service levels or fulfil orders.

If the problem was acute when Cameron made that pledge, it is now a full-blown crisis. Around 600 curry restaurants have closed in the past 18 months, while there are fears that a further 4,000 – about a third of the industry – could shut.

The shortage of chefs means they demand increasingly high wages. Dr Wali Uddin, who owns the Britannia Spice in Edinburgh, says a chef’s pay packet has doubled in the last two years, and is now up to £700-800 a week.

“Usually I had seven chefs, but now just three,” says Uddin. “There are not enough chefs, so we can’t grow.”

While Labour and Andrew Little are busy wrecking businesses through sabotage and poorly disguised racism, at least the Kiwi curry chefs can have a rewarding future by leaving New Zealand and heading to Blighty.


The Guardian

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.