Rugged West Coast due to erosion, but people who live there want to stop it

Some people just have to whinge.

The king tide was beautiful yesterday morning as it lapped on the rocks outside my house. But on the West Coast, made rugged by erosion, storms, and tides, they are wanting to halt nature.

The king tide has passed uneventfully along Auckland’s coast this morning, but it’s bringing waves of anxiety to the West Coast.

Buller District Council’s beach camp at Punakaiki is taking a battering.

Manager Craig Findlay said there was erosion all along the foreshore, and it would be the end of the weekend before the extent of the damage was clear.

He said waves were undercutting big trees at the southern end of the camp, and he expected some established trees would be lying in the sand by the end of the weekend.Mr Findlay said it would be devastating to lose large trees to the tidal battering, as they were irreplaceable.

Wave upon wave continues to batter a West Coast campground as this weekend’s king tide pummels the foreshore.

Yeah, that’s what tides do…and the wind…but claiming trees…which grow…are irreplaceable is ridiculous. Some people say stupid things. Plant some more.

Punakaiki Beach Camp manager Craig Findlay said they won’t know the full extent of the erosion until the consecutive king tides abate, but expects around one-and-a-half metres will be washed away from the front of the camp by the end of the weekend.

“What you see is waves riding up the beach and pushing into the edge of the camp, which is predominantly now a vertical face of sand with trees and shrubs on its edge,” said Mr Findlay.

“The significant thing is it’s now undercutting the big trees to the southern end of the camp, so I would expect we will see some established trees lying in the sand by the end of the weekend, which will be devastating because we can’t replace them.”

Mr Findlay said a West Coast Regional Council report by coastal engineers is expected to be released next week, which he hopes will provide some solutions for a mechanism that will save both the foreshore and the camp.

I wonder how that stupid “pristine beach” that people wanted to buy fared. One day a big storm will wash that away…it’s a sandpit exposed to the ocean with a river behind it…one big storm event and it will be gone; pristine no more.

I watch the tide and storms move literally tonnes of sand outside my place…it is awesome. Four weeks ago there was almost no sand outside my place; now it is piled up halfway up the rocks. That’s nature.

 

– NZ Herald


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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