The point is, this 16-year-old isn’t a product of our culture – yet here he is

A 16-year-old boy in Sydney faces terrorism charges which police say is linked to Anzac Day commemorations.

He was arrested yesterday at his home in western Sydney by officers from the New South Wales Joint Counter Terrorism Team.

He was taken to Auburn Police Station, where he was charged with one count of preparing or planning a terrorist act, NSW Police has said in a statement.

The offence carries a maximum penalty of life imprisonment.

NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione said JCTT officers were forced to act yesterday afternoon in order to ensure public safety.

“Clearly we have taken swift action to ensure community safety on the eve of a sacred day on the Australian calendar,” Commissioner Scipione said.

“I want to assure the NSW community that our counter terrorism capability is such that we were able to move quickly to prevent harm.”

“Anzac Day should be observed by all in our community free from fear and I would encourage everyone to enjoy this special day,” he said.

The 16-year-old was refused bail and will appear in a children’s court today.

I’m looking forward to more information being released about this incident. Was the 16-year-old born in Australia, or a child of a recent immigrant? Was the 16-year-old motivated by a religion of any kind? Were his motivations created by his family or from external influences?

One thing is for sure: thank goodness he slipped up enough to end up on the radar of security services because committing a terrorist act at an Anzac event. It would have been the start of something that I’m not sure you can put the lid back on.

And yet, it’s just a matter of time…

 

– Newshub


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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