Photo Of The Day

Zdenka Fantlova, who had been a prisoner at Belsen, met for the first time George Leonard, a British soldier who had been among those liberating the concentration camp seven decades ago. Photo BBC.

Zdenka Fantlova, who had been a prisoner at Belsen, met for the first time George Leonard, a British soldier who had been among those liberating the concentration camp seven decades ago. Photo BBC.

An Incredible Survival Story

The Tin Ring

Somehow, the remarkable Zdenka defied all the odds, all the horrors of the Holocaust Concentration camps, and somehow survived.

Somehow, she retained and has never been separated from the tin ring which Arno, the boy she loved, had secretly passed to her in the camp.

And, somehow, this troth serves as a repudiation of the visceral hatred and violence represented by Auschwitz, Treblinka, Bergen Belsen and all the other monstrous Nazi extermination centres.

Zdenka Fantlová’s childhood in Czechoslovakia was one of great happiness and love and her life was like that of any other teenager. However, her peaceful existence was soon to be shattered and she was sent to Terezín concentration camp. Here she was given a home-made tin ring by her first love Arno with ‘Arno 13.6.1942’ engraved on it. When he gave her the ring he said, ‘That’s for our engagement. And to keep you safe. If we are both alive when the war ends I will find you’. Arno was sent East on a penal transport later that same day; she never saw him again. After surviving six concentration camps, risking her life for the tin ring and death marches Zdenka found herself, in the last chaotic days of the war, at the hell that was Bergen Belsen.

Zdenka is one of the few living eye-witnesses to the horror of the Holocaust. She survived six concentration camps, lost her entire family and endured unimaginable horrors.

When she was just 17-years-old a simple tin ring made for her by her boyfriend became central to her will to live, until he was selected for one of the early trains “to the east.’’ Though her boyfriend died, Zdenka clung to the simple tin ring as a symbol of hope. Her tin ring that she risked everything to keep through all the horrors till liberation, until she was surrounded by the dead and dying and close to becoming one of them herself.

“Then, everyone was on his own,’’ she says. “What most people are interested in [now] is the art of survival, and there is a secret to it. . . . I was 17, I was young, healthy, I was single, I was in love – and that is a tremendous power. To be in love and to have hope was something that gives you strength.

“It’s actually quite simple. Most people who came in felt like a victim. If you feel like a victim you become one. It takes a lot of energy out of you. You are afraid, you worry about what’s going to happen,’’ she says. “I never felt like a victim. I actually felt as though it has nothing to do with me. I was an observer looking out at the barbed wire, the guards, and the dogs. And if you don’t feel like a victim you have a chance.’’

It was there in April 1945 that she literally dragged herself through the corpses to the Red Cross station of the liberating British Army. Starved, racked with typhoid and wearing the only clothes she had – a filthy green ball-gown crawling with lice – she found a saviour in the form of young military medic. Under strict orders to methodically work his way through the tens of thousands of dead and dying, he should have ignored her but he smuggled her aboard an Army ambulance

Zdenka never got the chance to thank him. It is fascinating that she can talk in a remarkably detached way about the brutality of the camps and the death of her entire family – she admits that it feels as though it happened to someone else. But the fact that, after years of trying to track him down, she is still no closer to identifying the soldier who saved her life, still reduces her to tears. Her story remains a unique account of human endurance and will power. Her story is dedicated to the unknown British soldier.

In 2015, Zdenka, met for the first time George Leonard, a British soldier who had been among those liberating the concentration camp seven decades ago.

Both wept at the memories the meeting provoked, although those memories had never left them. In his mind will forever be the shock and the horror, a vision of hell for which even a long and bloody war could not have prepared him. In her mind, one imagines, as well as the indelible tragedy and terror would be joy and gratitude for a long life she must have thought she would never live.

Zdenka Fantlová's Tin Ring. 13 June 2013. Somehow, she retained it and has never been separated from the tin ring which Arno, the boy she loved, had secretly passed to her in the camp.

Zdenka Fantlová’s Tin Ring. 13 June 2013. Somehow, she retained it and has never been separated from the tin ring which Arno, the boy she loved, had secretly passed to her in the camp.

Events at Belsen being filmed. Because the film that came back from the many camps was so extensive and the editing was such a momentous task and there were so many complex and delicate issues to confront that it did not happen quickly.

Events at Belsen being filmed. Because the film that came back from the many camps was so extensive and the editing was such a momentous task and there were so many complex and delicate issues to confront that it did not happen quickly.

George Leonard in his best uniform at Belsen.

George Leonard in his best uniform at Belsen.

Lance Bombardier George Leonard's letter is one of the first eyewitness accounts of the horrors of Belsen concentration camp by a British Soldier. George's head is circled in grey.

Lance Bombardier George Leonard’s letter is one of the first eyewitness accounts of the horrors of Belsen concentration camp by a British Soldier. George’s head is circled in grey.

Bergen-Belsen Nazi death camp liberated by British forces in 1945. A dishevelled prisoner sits alone in the Nazi concentration camp at Belsen, near Hamburg.

Bergen-Belsen Nazi death camp liberated by British forces in 1945. A dishevelled prisoner sits alone in the Nazi concentration camp at Belsen, near Hamburg.

Zdenka Fantlova and George Leonard an emotional reunion. Photo: BBC.

Zdenka Fantlova and George Leonard an emotional reunion. Photo: BBC.

The emotional reunion between Bergen-Belsen survivor Zdenka Fantlova and George Leonard who helped liberate Bergen-Belsen as British soldier.

The emotional reunion between Bergen-Belsen survivor Zdenka Fantlova and George Leonard who helped liberate Bergen-Belsen as British soldier.

When the victorious troops marched through the pretty north German countryside on that April day they knew they were going to a concentration camp but did not know they would be entering a place that defied belief. No vision of Hades produced by any artist in history, no description by any writer however gothic and horrible comes close to what they found.

In the spring of 1945, British, American and Soviet troops were headed toward Berlin in the final days of the war. Along with them were soldiers who’d been trained as cameramen—young, brawny men with cigarettes hanging out of their mouths and large, boxy cameras hoisted up on their shoulders, who arrived at concentration camps during their liberation to record the harrowing aftermath of the atrocities there.

It took a while for details about the concentration camps to get out. On April 19, 1945, BBC Radio aired a controversial report by Richard Dimbleby about his experience at Bergen-Belsen, in northern Germany. Initially, the BBC refused to air the report; the broadcaster simply couldn’t believe Dimbleby hadn’t embellished the details. “I found myself in the world of a nightmare,” he said.

“Dead bodies, some of them in decay, lay strewn about the road and along the rutted tracks. On each side of the road were brown wooden huts. There were faces at the windows. The bony, emaciated faces of starving women too weak to come outside, propping themselves against the glass to see the daylight before they died. And they were dying, every hour and every minute.”

The report was so stunning that, a couple of days later, British film pioneer Sidney Bernstein, then a leading film producer and head of film for Britain’s psychological war department, made his way to the camp. What he found there inspired his next endeavor: a full-length documentary that would portray the Nazis’ horrific crimes so vividly it would be impossible to deny they ever took place.

 After the American and British governments approved his film, Bernstein handpicked a powerhouse team, including editor Stewart McAllistar, writers Richard Crossman and Colin Willis, and a famous movie director, Alfred Hitchcock. They had just three months to complete the documentary from reels and reels of footage captured by those British, American and Russian cameramen.

Alfred Hitchcock types a script on a portable typewriter his apartment in the Wilshire Palms. Hitchcock wanted his film on the Holocaust to be as believable and irrefutable as possible—to ensure that the massacre of 11 million people would never be forgotten. PETER STACKPOLE/THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY/HBO.

Alfred Hitchcock types a script on a portable typewriter his apartment in the Wilshire Palms. Hitchcock wanted his film on the Holocaust to be as believable and irrefutable as possible —to ensure that the massacre of millions of people would never be forgotten. PETER STACKPOLE/THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY/HBO.

Night Will Fall shows many of these scenes, and they are rife with unspeakable details: Dead bodies are strewn across plots of land, some in heaps and others lined up like a carpet of human carcasses. When the camera zooms in, we see limbs, as thin as bones, tangled together like pretzels. Skulls cracked open by puncture wounds. Gaunt, hollow eyes and gaping mouths frozen in silent screams. Shoulders, thighs and legs marked by burns, cuts and filth.

We see soldiers slinging the dead over their shoulders as they hurl them into dump trucks. We watch the twins who survived Dr. Josef Mengele’s grotesque human experiments at Auschwitz walk through a narrow corridor of barbed wire. And we look into the eyes of the dead and dying at Dachau, which John Krish, an editor on the film, said “was like looking into the most appalling hell possible.” All the while, German locals stood on the sidelines, bearing witness to a genocide they claimed they didn’t know about.

The images will make you want to look away, but don’t. As Raye Farr, a director at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, says in the documentary, “The films shot at Bergen-Belsen by the British cameramen reveal every level of humanity to a much greater extent than any other of the film evidence.”

Helping us make sense of this heart- and gut-wrenching footage are interviews with concentration camp survivors, the soldiers who saved them and the cameramen who were there to record the slaughter.

“You couldn’t tell if they were dead or alive,” Benjamin Ferencz, a sergeant with the U.S. Third Army, recalls in the documentary. “You’d step over a body and it would suddenly wave at you, raise a hand. Total chaos. Dysentery, typhoid, all kinds of diseases in the camp. Putrid. The smell of the camps, the crematorium was still going, the dead bodies piled up like cordwood in front of the crematorium. It’s hard to imagine for a normal human mind. I had peered into hell and that’s—” Ferencz, who later served as chief prosecutor during the Nuremberg Trials, tries to stop himself from crying. “It’s not something you quickly forget.”

German Concentration Camps Factual Survey is Hitchcock’s only known documentary feature. Though his tenure on the film lasted just one month, he made lasting contributions, helping to outline the story and emphasizing the importance of showing just how close the concentration camps were to picturesque villages where German civilians lived during the war. He wanted the film to be as believable and irrefutable as possible to ensure that the massacre of 11 million people, including 6 million Jews, would never be forgotten.

In the summer of 1945, plans for German Concentration Camps Factual Survey began to unravel. The American government grew impatient with Bernstein’s slow, meticulous process and pulled its footage, hiring its own director, Billy Wilder, to create a shorter film. Wilder’s Death Mills premiered in Wurzberg following an operetta with Lillian Harvey. Of the 500-odd people in the audience at the beginning of the screening, less than 100 were in their seats at the end.

Bernstein’s work had also become a political headache for American and British officials. The consensus was that the film was no longer necessary. “Policy at the moment in Germany is entirely in the direction of encouraging, stimulating and interesting the Germans out of their apathy, and there are people around the Commander-in-Chief who will say ‘No atrocity film,’” read a memo Bernstein received on August 4, 1945, from the British Foreign Office. German Concentration Camps Factual Survey was shelved in September 1945, though its footage was key evidence in the trials of Nazi war criminals.

Five years ago, the IWM began restoring and completing Bernstein and Hitchcock’s film, as they had originally envisioned it, including the sixth reel, which was unfinished when the project was shut down. Night Will Fall ends with a scene from the now-completed documentary. A large group of civilians (it’s unclear who) walk through one of the camps, passing by decaying bodies on both sides of the road. As the camera zooms in on the grotesque faces of the dead, the narrator speaks:

“Unless the world learns the lesson these pictures teach, night will fall. But by God’s grace, we who live will learn.”

As Bernstein said in an interview in 1984, “My instructions were to film everything which would prove one day that this had actually happened. It’d be a lesson to all mankind as well. As to the Germans, for whom the film that we were putting together was designed…it would be the evidence we could show them…. I wanted to prove that they had seen it, so there was evidence, because I guessed rightly, and most people would deny that it happened.”

Zdenka’s Story.

The period of time into which I was born and which I grew up was a rare combination of peace, education and culture for which I am grateful – in spite of what followed. I have lived my life under a variety of different conditions and circumstances.

Father, sister and myself 1938.

Father, sister and myself 1938.

My Father in Luhacovice, 1937.

My Father in Luhacovice, 1937.

Zdenka Fantlová just after the war, which she survived thanks to a compassionate British officer. Times photographer, Chris Harris.

Zdenka Fantlová just after the war, which she survived thanks to a compassionate British officer. Times photographer, Chris Harris.

I was born in 1922. I had a happy family life with my mother, father, brother and sister. Life in the new Czechoslovak state with President Masaryk at the helm was idyllic. Even Plato said:

“If a country should function and prosper, its king should be a philosopher. And a philosopher should be the king.” 

And we had just that. People were great patriots, happy at work, life was a joy.

For us children it meant school, learning languages and musical instruments. For me it was the piano and I practiced daily. There was also a lot of sport. In the summer holidays in the countryside with the rivers or lakes to swim in, playing tennis as well as walking trips to various castles which were left by their previous owners – mostly aristocrats. In winter it was skiing in the mountains as well as ice-skating on the local pond. After Christmas plans were made for the following year and sometimes even for the rest of our lives. But it was not to be. There always seem to be big political moves and happenings in which we play no part and yet when they do happen, they engulf us completely, they turn our life upside down and change it forever. And that was what happened.

On 15th March 1939 Germany invaded and occupied Czechoslovakia. New laws were introduced immediately, which separated the Jews from the rest of the population. Their possessions were gradually confiscated. Businesses, shops, bank accounts, radios, domestic animals, staff were disallowed followed by the expulsion from all state educational establishments of Jewish students. A sudden catastrophe and worse was to come.

Concentration camps were built, some with gas chambers to exterminate the whole Jewish population from occupied Europe (Austria, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Poland, France, Belgium, Holland, Norway etc.) to fulfil a German dream of a “One thousand years of a pure Aryan race” – read German – occupying Europe.

We were ordered to leave home and were transported to Terezin. From there most people were sent to the East, most of them to the infamous Auschwitz where majority of them – men, women, and children – were killed in gas chambers on arrival.

Only the young, capable of hard labour were spared and sent elsewhere to work as long as their strength lasted before they died, too. Everybody had to fight for their own life as best as they could. I had my boyfriend’s ring with me which represented the symbol of love and hope for me and kept me going, regardless of hard conditions wherever I was. When the war finished in May 1945 it transpired 6 million of European Jews including my whole family perished. My mother was gassed in Auschwitz; father died on a death march from there, my sister in Bergen-Belsen and my brother was shot trying to escape from a camp. Only I survived.

I was taken by the International Red Cross to Sweden with thousands of inmates who survived Bergen-Belsen. Now I was completely alone in the world having lost everything, my family, my home, my country. I did not wish to live. And yet somehow I found the strength to rebuild my life elsewhere. I believe we are all born with a sort of blueprint – a fate – which guides us and directs us through life. I decided to make Sweden my new home. I learnt the language, became a secretary at the Czech Embassy in Stockholm, and started to build a firm ground under my feet.

The war was behind me and I replaced my original home with a new country. But it did not last. Political upheaval in Czechoslovakia after the war resulted in February 1948 with a communist dictatorship taking over the originally democratic country. The existing staff of the Embassy were dismissed and left for other countries. Europe was again in a political turmoil and I wanted to leave and go as far away as possible.

So I went to Australia. Alone, without much money and any friends waiting for me there I landed in Melbourne. Australia in the late 1940’s seemed very far away from the rest of the world. It lived its own life and foreigners were regarded with some suspicion. Yet life under the blue sky was pleasant. I did make new friends, found a mate, also a refuge from Europe, married him and had a daughter. New life started again under new stars. The only thing I could not get used to was the position of the Moon which seemed to be on the “wrong” side. And strange stars I did not know, such as Southern Cross.

I had to get used to having Christmas in hot summer and missed European winter, snow, and Christmas trees. Yet life went on regardless. A chance opened a door for me to join a new theatre company and my stage career as an actress started. I performed in twelve stage plays, mostly European Classics. My role in my last play there, “The Rose Tattoo” by Tennessee Williams, was put forward for a high Australian theatrical award. New life in Australia went on and I accepted it as my final home and thought that I would die there, far away from my own original country. But even that did not happen as expected.

A company my husband worked for had offices in Germany and London. In 1969 he was offered a transfer to the London office, initially for two years. We accepted the offer as a short break. Especially me. To see Europe again, green meadows with colourful flowers, forests with real fir trees, flowing rivers from the mountains behind and the old sky with the Moon surrounded by the familiar stars! I could hardly wait. We arrived in London in Christmas 1969 and settled down. I fell in love with London. Every day I took walks through various parts of the town, particularly the older ones and got familiar with its history. In the meantime my daughter went to university in Britain. Two years were to pass very quickly but while in London my husband’s job in Melbourne was given to another person and his stay in London was extended. The original two years grew to four and seven and ten and eventually we stayed in Britain, back in familiar Europe after twenty years in Australia. After many years I made a trip to my hometown in a no longer communist Czech Republic to be confronted with my past – after fifty years. It felt as though I returned from an after-life.

I am determined that my story will continue to be told and the lessons from that time are not lost. I am particularly interested in young people bearing witness to my life. I am now 94 years old and feel as though I have lived 250 years through five different lives in different countries, with different people under different conditions – and in the end made a full life circle. Life is wonderful with all its changes and I am grateful for every single day I live through.

A sticker from around 1938 reading: 'Jewish shop! Whoever buys here will be photographed' is displayed at an exhibition of antisemitic and racist stickers at the Deutsches Historisches Museum, German Historic Museum, in Berlin, Tuesday, April 19, 2016. One of Germany?s main history museums is exhibiting racist and anti-Semitic stickers spanning more than a century, a show that comes as the country worries about racism amid the migrant crisis. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

A sticker from around 1938 reading: ‘Jewish shop! Whoever buys here will be photographed’ is displayed at an exhibition of antisemitic and racist stickers at the Deutsches Historisches Museum, German Historic Museum, in Berlin, Tuesday, April 19, 2016. One of Germany?s main history museums is exhibiting racist and anti-Semitic stickers spanning more than a century, a show that comes as the country worries about racism amid the migrant crisis. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

BERGEN-BELSEN 

German military authorities established the Bergen-Belsen camp in 1940, in a location south of the small towns of Bergen and Belsen, about 11 miles north of Celle, Germany. The Bergen-Belsen complex was composed of numerous camps, established at various times during its existence.

There were three main camps: the POW camp, the “residence camp,” and the “prisoners’ camp.” Until 1943, Bergen-Belsen was exclusively a prisoner-of-war (POW) camp. Over the course of its existence, the Bergen-Belsen camp complex held Jews, POWs, political prisoners, Roma (Gypsies), criminals, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and homosexuals.

As Allied forces advanced in late 1944 and early 1945, Bergen-Belsen became a collection camp for thousands of Jewish prisoners evacuated from camps closer to the front. The arrival of thousands of new prisoners, many of them survivors of forced evacuations on foot, overwhelmed the meager resources of the camp.

By early 1945, overcrowding, poor sanitary conditions, and a lack of adequate food, water, and shelter led to an outbreak of diseases such as typhus, tuberculosis, and dysentery. In the first few months of the year, tens of thousands of prisoners died. On April 15, 1945, British forces liberated Bergen-Belsen. The British found around sixty thousand prisoners in the camp, most of them seriously ill. Thousands of corpses lay unburied on the camp grounds. More than 13,000 former prisoners, too ill to recover, died after liberation. After evacuating Bergen-Belsen, British forces burned down the camp to prevent the spread of typhus.

During its existence, approximately 50,000 persons died in the Bergen-Belsen camp complex, including Anne Frank. Most of the dead were Jews. After liberation, British occupation authorities established a displaced persons camp nearby that housed more than 12,000 survivors.

After the Holocaust world leaders declared “never again” – and after every subsequent genocide, in Cambodia, Rwanda, Congo, Burma, Kosovo, and the rest, they have said exactly the same thing.

We need to understand gross inhumanity precisely because it has, does, and is happening all over again.

Image 9/10 A sticker from around 1900 reading: 'Protect the German fatherland - liberate it from the Jewish hand! ' is displayed at an exhibition of antisemitic and racist stickers at the Deutsches Historisches Museum, German Historic Museum, in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, April 19, 2016. One of Germany?s main history museums is exhibiting racist and anti-Semitic stickers spanning more than a century, a show that comes as the country worries about racism amid the migrant crisis. AP Photo/Markus Schreiber.

A sticker from around 1900 reading: ‘Protect the German fatherland – liberate it from the Jewish hand! ‘ is displayed at an exhibition of antisemitic and racist stickers at the Deutsches Historisches Museum, German Historic Museum, in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, April 19, 2016. One of Germany?s main history museums is exhibiting racist and anti-Semitic stickers spanning more than a century, a show that comes as the country worries about racism amid the migrant crisis. AP Photo/Markus Schreiber.

A sticker from around 1900 reading: 'Don't buy from Jews' is displayed at an exhibition of antisemitic and racist stickers at the Deutsches Historisches Museum, German Historic Museum, in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, April 19, 2016. One of Germany?s main history museums is exhibiting racist and anti-Semitic stickers spanning more than a century, a show that comes as the country worries about racism amid the migrant crisis.. AP Photo/Markus Schreiber.

A sticker from around 1900 reading: ‘Don’t buy from Jews’ is displayed at an exhibition of antisemitic and racist stickers at the Deutsches Historisches Museum, German Historic Museum, in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, April 19, 2016. One of Germany?s main history museums is exhibiting racist and anti-Semitic stickers spanning more than a century, a show that comes as the country worries about racism amid the migrant crisis.. AP Photo/Markus Schreiber.

A sticker from around 1900 reads, “Away with Juda! The Jews are Germany’s disaster.” Photo: Markus Schreiber / Photos By Markus Schreiber / Associated Press.

A sticker from around 1900 reads, “Away with Juda! The Jews are Germany’s disaster.” Photo: Markus Schreiber / Photos By Markus Schreiber / Associated Press.

A sticker from around 2011 reading: 'Cult of Guilt: Holocaust - I can't hear it anymore!' is displayed at an exhibition of antisemitic and racist stickers at the Deutsches Historisches Museum, German Historic Museum, in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, April 19, 2016. One of Germany's main history museums is exhibiting racist and anti-Semitic stickers spanning more than a century, a show that comes as the country worries about racism amid the migrant crisis. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

A sticker from around 2011 reading: ‘Cult of Guilt: Holocaust – I can’t hear it anymore!’ is displayed at an exhibition of antisemitic and racist stickers at the Deutsches Historisches Museum, German Historic Museum, in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, April 19, 2016. One of Germany’s main history museums is exhibiting racist and anti-Semitic stickers spanning more than a century, a show that comes as the country worries about racism amid the migrant crisis. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

Warning Distressing Footage in the following clips.

Liberation of Bergen-Belsen

British troops liberated the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany in April 1945. They filmed statements from members of their own forces.

GERMANY, APRIL 1945

Historical Film Footage

I am the Reverend T.J. Stretch attached as padre to the formation concerning this camp. My home is at Fishguard, my parish was at Holy Trinity Church, Aberystwyth. I’ve been here eight days, and never in my life have I seen such damnable ghastliness. This morning we buried over five thousand bodies, we don’t know who they are. Behind me, you can see a pit which will contain another five thousand. There are two others like it in preparation. All these deaths have been caused by systematic starvation, typhus, and disease, which have been spread because of the treatment meted out to these poor people by their SS guards and their SS chief.

Liberation of Bergen-Belsen

BERGEN-BELSEN, GERMANY, APRIL 1945

Historical Film Footage

After British soldiers liberated the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany, they forced the remaining SS guards to help bury the dead. Here, survivors of the camp taunt their former tormentors, who prepare to bury victims in a mass grave.

Bergen-Belsen after liberation

BERGEN-BELSEN, GERMANY, 1945

Historical Film Footage

Most of the people seemed to be listless beyond hope and astonishment. Hunger had probably affected them that way. We discovered that among this stench of disease and decay was something a bit worse than hunger. Moving vaguely on rickety skeleton legs they were too ill to eat. How grateful they were for a kindly word or gesture. What misery to live among such unmentionable filth, with scarcely the strength to pick the lice which inevitably swarmed over them. They seemed accustomed to the smell and the horror. They had seen all there was to see. Huts were almost impossible to go near. They were full of tangled masses of people who had died slowly and painfully of starvation and disease, writhing in agony, helpless in puddles of excrement. It was difficult to imagine those orchards now, those rich fields where the stolid cattle cropped the juicy grass. For here, a few minutes away inside the barbed wire, was nothing but filth and death.

Warning Distressing Footage

Video: Belsen Concentration Camp’s Liberation (1945)

Video: Nazi Concentration Camps – Film shown at Nuremberg War Crimes Trials

Video: The BBC’s Fiona Bruce reports on the emotional reunion between camp survivor Zdenka Fantlova and British Soldier George Leonard.

Video: Nazi Concentration Camps : Free Download & Streaming : Interne

On film, full horror of concentration camps – Daily Express

The Tin Ring (Love and survival in the Holocaust): Amazon …

Night Will Fall 

German Historical Museum

Bergen-Belsen – United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Belsen concentration camp 1945 – The National Archives

At the Gates of Hell: The Liberation of Bergen-Belsen, April 1945 |

 


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  • Jude

    A well chosen POTD Lux.
    The history must never be forgotten.
    The anti Semitism shown in some quarters makes me very angry.
    Zdenka is one truly remarkable woman!

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