Winston tells the UK to leave Europe and come home to the colonies

For an old fella he sure gets around. Winston Peters was in the UK giving them a lecture on abandoning the broken experiment called the EU:

Britain would be better of trading with the Commonwealth than with Europe, Winston Peters has told a meeting in London.

“Why trade on a continental scale when you could really trade on a global scale,” the NZ First leader said.

“To leave or stay in the EU is for the British people to decide, but they also have a chance to link up with the dynamic economic powerhouse of the Commonwealth.”

He suggested the creation of a Commonwealth free trade area.

“In 2014 the Commonwealth produced GDP of $10.45 trillion, a massive 17 per cent of gross world product,” he said.  

“Part of the choice the UK faces is of a Europe, divided and indebted, or trade in the developed and emerging economies of the Commonwealth.”

Mr Peters was invited to London by the UK Independence Party, known as UKIP.

Despite gaining the third largest share of the vote in last year’s elections, the right-wing party has only one MP and three representatives in the House of Lords.

The meeting took place at a venue in the House of Lords.

Britain votes in a referendum on June 23 to decide whether to stay in the EU or leave it.

UKIP strongly supports leaving the EU.

Europe is broken and waves of illegal immigrants are breaking it further. The UK would be better off abandoning it.

A Commonwealth Free Trade Agreement sounds feasible and appealing.

 

– NZ Newswire


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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