Done like a dog’s dinner, says Audrey Young about David Cameron

Audrey Young provides her opinion on Brexit with a slight segue to John Key and his own referendum troubles.

David Cameron would never have called a referendum on the EU if he thought he would be done like a dog’s dinner, as he has been.

He had supreme confidence in his leadership ability and powers of persuasion when he announced in 2013 why he wanted a referendum. He over-estimated.

It has mild echoes of a far less important referendum promoted by his friend and a similarly unpersuasive Prime Minister John Key on changing the flag.

Cameron fittingly announced tonight he will relinquish his captain’s cap before the Conservatives conference in Birmingham, on October 2.

He has shown leadership in resigning. I wonder when Jeremy Corbyn will likewise show some leadership by resigning, having led Labour down the wrong path of the EU?

[H]istory will define him as a loser and Remainers will beat him up for a miscalculation in holding the referendum at all. So why did he?

EU membership had become such a divisive issue in Britain, he felt it had to be confronted properly.

As Cameron said in his 2013 speech: “Democratic consent for the EU in Britain is now wafer thin.”

You don’t answer the growing perception of a deficit of democracy with another commission of inquiry.

So, Cameron put it to the voters and lost by slightly more than the thickness of a wafer, but lost nonetheless.

Cameron wanted to cauterise the EU issue both from the 2015 general election campaign and as a destructive source of friction within his own Conservative Party. Those divisions have only widened in the course of the referendum.

But at the time, Cameron thought he could persuade the EU to offer Britain a great deal to stay in the EU, he thought he could persuade the public it was an irresistible deal, and he thought he would have an ally in Labour.

Not surprisingly , Europe didn’t love its half-hearted partners across the channel enough to make an irresistible offer.

Europe was hardly going to give up unelected control were they? That was Europe’s problem: faceless bureaucrats making decisions affecting English. Well, that is now over.

With his re-election last year for a second term, Cameron had political capital to burn over the EU, which has done, ashes to ashes.

Europe’s refugee crisis and the prospect of continued unregulated immigration from Europe added oxygen.

The fact that Britain cannot control its immigration from the EU is a legitimate concern which was not assuaged.

And the fact that Labour’s Remain campaign was pathetic did not help garner support among its core constituency where Euroscepticism thrives.

If the EU had remained a trade bloc this may never had happened. Once they went to an integrated currency, no borders and faceless bureaucrats making stupid laws, then it was doomed. Brexit is just the start of the dismantling of the EU.

Cameron is gone and now we wait to see if Corbyn is knifed or falls on his own sword.

 

– NZ Herald


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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