Duff on Hone II – the Return of Hone

This columnist usually stays away from politicians. But then Hone announced a comeback. Oh dear. Maoridom needs Hone Harawira back in politics like the proverbial hole in the head. He couldn’t get on with the Maori Party, founded the Mana Party, had a bromance with the gifted but flawed German, Kim Dotcom. And when the admirable Kelvin Davis thrashed him in the last election, who does he turn on? Dotcom. But of course others, too.

A man with a hero-complex is not what Maoridom needs. They – our people – do not need someone pandering to our lowest common denominator, telling them their failures are not their fault but the fault of rich white people, greedy capitalists, a stacked system, government, all on the assumption these people are incapable of helping themselves.

Not once have we heard offered a solution to “poor” people’s woes, to “poverty.” He came up with no ideas on creating employment. Nor use of Northland Maori land.

No ideas on instilling an education ethos in the outlook of the very culture of those he claims to be fighting for. His ideas were and still are zilch.

He hasn’t demonstrated by a single gesture that maybe he should take a less hardline stance. Oh, no. Not Hone. He’s the self-described “fighter.” Whoopee, that’s gonna put a lot of Maori into their own homes and give them jobs, lift us up to the educated, aspiring middle class, a scrapper representing us.

He just wants to be a heroic figurehead yet don’t dare subject him to scrutiny or criticism. Let him be the warrior with his taiaha doing battle with non-Maori who don’t have taiahas. Whoo, that’s tough.

Listen, pal. The last thing we need are bloody bone-headed fighters. Sure, genetically, we’ve all got the warrior in us. But for God’s sake know when to apply it and certainly not to advancing the Maori race.

We need our woman elevated to absolutely equal status. Not this outdated model of assigning women seats behind the front row because – yeah, sure – they need the males to protect them. Yes, women do need protecting – from too many of our Maori males. Too many of our kids need protecting from adult Maori males.

Maoridom doesn’t need tough-guy rhetoric, or protest for its own sake, a ceaseless outpour of negativity and blame-laying. In case you’re not aware, Hone, we’ve long used role models at our schools to give positive messages like: “It’s cool to read. It’s cool to aspire.” That’s all. Pretty simple, isn’t it?

Not for Hone. He wants to make it a scrap, a brawl, a war of insults and sarcasm. The man who thought Helen Clark getting “the bash” when she was mobbed by protesters at Te Tii Marae was not so bad.

We knew he’d be back because he loves a scrap and loves being a heroic warrior figure.

Hone plays to his own constituents, who are much more interested in sovereignty and sticking it to the man.  To say Kelvin Davis is doing more for Maori than Hone ever has is probably only true if you look at Maori nationally rather than just the north.  Hone will get back in, or only just miss out.   The people who kicked him in the slats for taking it up the scratcher from Kimbo won’t like Davis simply because he’s Labour.  Northland went from National to Winston for crying out loud.  Te Tai Tokerau will go back to Mana, and the bashing – at all levels – will continue.

 

– Alan Duff, NZ Herald


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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