The Poms are looking forward to burning silly EU laws

The Poms are celebrating and realising that they can finally get rid of stupid EU laws that were imposed on them.

As the country reflects in the wake of the EU referendum, Leave voters are celebrating changing the course of history and breaking free from the shackles of the European Union – and its laws and regulations.

Despite the fact Britain has voted in favour of leaving the EU, this is still the start of a long process before the country officially untangles from the network of institutions in Brussels.

And among that network there were a number of bizarre – and some argued trivial – rules the Brussels bureaucracy passed.

Here are some of the more bizarre regulations the Brexiters can enjoy saying goodbye to.

1. Ban on curvy bananas and crooked cucumbers  

The first – and one which reared its head as the Brexit and Remain camps drew up their battles lines – was the banana regulation.

An example often cited as ‘legislative heavy-handedness’ was the EU ban on ‘bendy bananas’ and crooked cucumbers.

A 1994 EU regulation specified that bananas must be ‘free from abnormal curvature.’

EU rules also governed the shape of many other fruits and vegetables — cucumbers, for example, needed to be almost perfectly straight.

It smacks of Helen Clark’s shower heads and light bulb moments…speaking of which:

2. Incandescent lightbulbs 

Something else that could now make a return is the incandescent lightbulb.

Incandescent bulbs have been phased out in stages in the UK since 2009 following European regulations.

The Government banned the import of 100-watt bulbs from 2009, followed by a ban on 60w bulbs in 2011 and a full ban on all ‘traditional’ bulbs in 2012.

The bulbs were branded environmentally-unfriendly because some 95 per cent of the energy that goes into them gets turned into heat rather than light.

Following the EU’s ban on incandescent light-bulbs, many people were reported to have suffered epileptic fits from the flickering, supposedly eco-friendly fluorescent bulbs.

3. Vacuum cleaners

On his campaign trail in recent weeks, Boris Johnson also blasted Brussels red tape that he said placed burdensome extra costs on UK retailers selling products such as bananas, vacuum cleaners and hairdryers.

The European Commission triggered an outcry by banning powerful vacuum cleaners two years ago.

From September 1, 2014, companies were prohibited from manufacturing or importing any vacuum cleaners above the 1,600-watt limit as part of a drive to reduce domestic electricity use.

A furore broke out when shoppers panic-bought high-powered vacuum cleaners ahead of the deadline in 2014.

This directive was expected to be extended to kettles, toasters, hair-dryers and other domestic appliances but it was shelved earlier this year amid fears it would drive the British public towards the EU exit door.

Insane stuff. Everyone wants a vacuum cleaner that can suck the chrome off a tow bar. But how about this lunatic law?

4. Drinking water does not prevent dehydration

In 2011, a ruling by the European Commission claimed that drinking water ‘does not ease dehydration’.

EU authorities passed a law which claimed scientists had found no evidence to suggest drinking water stopped dehydration. 

Manufacturers of bottled water were prohibited from labelling products with claims that would suggest consumption would fight dehydration.

Now are you starting to realise why the Poms voted for Brexit?

 – Daily Mail


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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