As predicted, Andrew Little grandstands over Iraq deployment

First, Andrew Little was against the Iraq deployment:

In his reply to the Prime Minister’s statement, Labour leader Andrew Little said Labour could see no case for sending troops to Iraq.

He said it was clear Islamic State was brutal. “There wouldn’t be a New Zealander who has seen those images whose stomachs have not been turned. But let’s be clear what we’re dealing with. They call themselves, Islamic State, but they are not a state. They run across borders, they are cultural, ethnic, religious and driven by a number of motivations.”

He said it was a “depository of the dispossessed, the extreme and yes, the evil, but it is not a conventional enemy”.

Mr Little said it was clear the Government had made its decision some time ago “and I venture to suggest it was taken for a range of reasons that have not been outlined today.”

He doubted Mr Key’s assurances the training forces would be “behind the wire”. He said there was little doubt the troops would be exposed to the wider combat and there was little to gain.

“After 10 years of training of the Iraq Army by the US Army, what impact will we have? What can we hope to achieve? We think be sending a very modest force, we are going to achieve what the US Army has not been able to achieve in 10 years? We will not fix the Iraqi Army. It is broken, it is corrupt.”

Then, after visiting the troops, he decided they were doing valuable work and could stay for a bit, but he still wanted them out.

Labour leader Andrew Little has made a top secret visit to Iraq to visit New Zealand troops based at Camp Taji and is now questioning whether the two-year term will be extended.

Mr Little has just left Iraq after Camp Taji with Defence Minister Gerry Brownlee and Chief of Defence Force Tim Keating.

Labour opposed the 2015 deployment of troops to help train Iraqi soldiers fight against Islamic State (Isis), but Mr Little said he accepted the invitation from Mr Brownlee because he believed it was important to see first hand the work of the troops and the conditions in which they lived.

Mr Little praised the “skill and professionalism” of the troops he met.

Now, after John Key has announced the troops are staying and extending their mission, he wants to bring them home again.

Labour leader Andrew Little says he will withdraw New Zealand troops from Iraq if his party is elected to power next year.

Mr Little said he expected the security situation in the Middle East to change significantly by the general election, by which time the Islamic State may have been pushed back further or defeated.

But if the conflict remained unchanged in Iraq and Syria, he confirmed he would withdraw New Zealand’s deployment of 143 trainers from Taji Military Base near Baghdad.

“If it’s the same as it is now I cannot see a case for continuing,” he told the Herald.

It seems that Labour’s election policy platform is what their unions want and whatever is against National.

Andrew Little is a gutless creep. He grandstands against our troops despite visiting them and praising their achievements and their skills. He’s a weasel. No one could have any confidence in this creature.

All of those comments just show that Andrew Little might think Daesh are scumbags but, since they are over there, we shouldn’t have to do anything about them. We have some of the best troops in the world who can put these scumbags into holes in the ground but Andrew Little and Labour would have us cut and run. Labour disgusts me. Andrew Little disgusts me. No wonder no one talked to him at the Gallipoli centenary celebrations; they knew what a gutless little toad he really is.

 

– NZ Herald (various dates)


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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