Scribble-faces fail in appeal

08092014 News. Cameron Burnell/Fairfax NZ. Dillin Pakai and Shane Pierre Harrison appeared in the High Court at Wellington where they pleaded not guilty of having murdered Alonsio Matalasi (known as Sio) at Petone on August 22, 2013.

Cameron Burnell/Fairfax NZ. Dillin Pakai and Shane Pierre Harrison appeared in the High Court at Wellington

You have to admire the cheek of scribble-faces, so tough they can tattoo their faces and even their eyelids, but get upset when the jury believes they are tough guys and finds them guilty.

They were fierce-looking men with full facial tattoos, were disrespectful to the court process and could not have given a good impression to the jury.

That was what the lawyer for one of two men appealing their murder convictions told the Court of Appeal in Wellington today.

Dillin Pakai and Shane Harrison were found guilty in 2014 of murdering Lower Hutt man Sio Matalasi.  

Mr Matalasi was fatally shot during a gang fracas between rival chapters of the Mongrel Mob at Petone flats in 2013.

Pakai was sentenced to life in prison with a minimum non-parole period of 12 years and Harrison was sentenced to life in prison with a minimum non-parole period of 13 years.

Pakai’s lawyer Kevin Smith says because of his appearance and behaviour throughout the trial, he couldn’t have given a good impression to the jury at all.

However Justice Randerson says that’s a prejudice the pair brought upon themselves.

I can’t imagine the arguments were that long before the Court of Appeal, and a predictably short verdict from Justice Randerson.

Basically these mongrels thought they were cool by wearing tough stickers on their face, and now they’ve got tough sentences to go with the tough stickers.

 

-NZ Herald


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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