Do White Lives Matter?

The Black Lives Matter Movement has been accused of being a racist and violent movement and from some videos I have seen of Black Lives Matter activists in action I would have to agree with that assessment of them. I watched one video where the BLM activists chanted ” Black Lives Matter ” while another crowd chanted ” All Lives Matter.”

Recently a three year old child fell into a moat that surrounded a gorilla enclosure and to protect the child from the gorilla that pulled it out of the water the gorilla was shot and killed. Look at the reaction on twitter to protecting the life of a child. Apparently White lives don’t matter.

screenshot-whaleoil.co.nz

screenshot-whaleoil.co.nz

Since the incident people are second guessing the actions of officials and are using video footage to make the case that the child was not in danger and that the animal should not have been killed. Apparently gorilla lives matter more than the lives of three-year old white children.

I challenge every single one of the people mourning the death of the gorilla to get into an enclosure with one and to take the risk that it may or may not hurt them. When a child is that small it can be killed within a couple of seconds by an animal that size. Would any of these people put their three-year old child in a cage with a gorilla and then rely on a tranquilizer dart that takes a long while to kick in, only using it when it starts showing hostile intent?

I think it is fair to say that if a black child or a Muslim child or a child of any other race had been in that situation very few people would have dared to criticise the actions of the Zoo officials for fear of being seen as racist or bigoted. White children however seem to be fair game because gorilla lives matter more than white lives.

99364274_gorilla-NEWS-large_trans++VUsV2lOUsi3VLW0hzHQEKd16SUdfpO2gf6l-DwNwmP8

99364274_gorilla-NEWS-large_trans++VUsV2lOUsi3VLW0hzHQEKd16SUdfpO2gf6l-DwNwmP8

If you are wondering whether or not New Zealanders think the same as the people on twitter here is a screenshot of a poll done on the topic by Paul Henry. Apparently gorilla lives matter more than 3-year-old white boys to New Zealanders too. How raaaaacist is that?

Screen Shot 2016-05-31 at 8.56.48 PM-Whaleoil.co.nz

Screen Shot 2016-05-31 at 8.56.48 PM-Whaleoil.co.nz

Before this post went live I discovered a very amusing fact. A fact that will change the opinions of so many people who valued the life of the gorilla over the life of a three year old boy. This fact is EPIC. You couldn’t make this stuff up.

screenshot-whaleoil.co.nz

screenshot-whaleoil.co.nz

 


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  • Odd Ball

    Just another bunch of cost free moralistic armchair critics, or so I thought until I read the linked article.
    Unbelievable, that’s all I can say..

    • Chinaman

      In the past we had a Christian worldview where ”mankind” was the pinnacle of creation but now in the post-modern world where neo-paganism/earth worship is promoted in schools,movies etc we have the screaming headlines that poor old H….. the 17 year old gorilla was MURDERED!

      • kereru

        Agree Chinaman. I’ve just posted a couple of paragraphs from an article on this very subject.

        • Chinaman

          Yes kereru, we are both saying the same thing…here is Rabbi Paul`s take on the subject from Romans,wonder how long before it is banned for being hate speech!

          24Therefore God gave them over in the sinful desires of their hearts to sexual impurity for the degrading of their bodies with one another. 25They exchanged the truth about God for a lie, and worshiped and served created things rather than the Creator—who is forever praised. Amen.

          26Because of this, God gave them over to shameful lusts. Even their women exchanged natural sexual relations for unnatural ones. 27In the same way the men also abandoned natural relations with women and were inflamed with lust for one another. Men committed shameful acts with other men, and received in themselves the due penalty for their error.

          • kereru

            Somewhat off topic, if I might say so. The issue here is whether a human life is worth more than an animal’s. I believe it was an unfortunate necessity to shoot the gorilla. As a parent I would take the responsibility for making sure that my child was under control. And yes, I do realise that this is not easy 100% of the time.

            Even so, in a zoo, or other public place, I would make sure the children understood that they must not run ahead, and should keep together. You never know what’s around the next corner and it’s very easy to get separated. I suspect the parents did not have effective control of their children.

  • Oh Please

    More proof that tweeters are ignorant.

  • JeffDaRef

    Odds-on that those harping on about the poor old gorilla are childless – anyone who is a parent would have been there pulling the trigger themselves…

  • jimknowsall

    The only person at fault here is the kid. Whatever fence the zoo builds, some stupid person will climb it. Parents cannot watch their child all the time – and it’s not desirable to do so in any case. We criticise parents enough for mollycoddling their kids and not letting them walk to school after all.
    The child intentionally did a stupid thing. He ignored the signs. He ignored his parents. He got through a fence. He fell or jumped into the moat. The gorilla ought not to have been shot. Rather the kid’s desperation to win a Darwin Award should have been respected.

    • Jman

      Seriously? The kid is 3 years old! I’m going to rather pin the blame on the zoo for not having a barricade that an inquisitive 3 year old can get through.

      • jimknowsall

        He was 4 I believe. And whatever fencing barrier there was, he still had to decide to jump down or not see a 12 foot sheer drop. But, let me present an analogy. Suppose a child is walking along a pavement with his parents and he suddenly decides to run into the road. Do we insist roads should be fenced? No. Do we blame the parent for not watching the child? No. Do we inflict capital punishment on any motorist that hits the child? No. The plain truth is that the child chooses to do a stupid thing.

        • KatB

          The child chose to do something that in your and my eyes is stupid, to him it seemed quite exciting and a great thing to do. That’s what being a kid and learning is all about. Sadly, for whatever reason, nobody was quick enough to stop this kid from doing what kids do.

          • jimknowsall

            Yes, and he ought to learn from his mistakes. Even when you are a kid, actions have consequences, which your parents are usually able to fix. But not always. Trying to blame everyone else though teaches all the wrong lessons about consequences and responsibility.

          • KatB

            Yes we all need to learn actions have consequences and hopefully we learn that on the small stuff so we don’t have to learn that on the big stuff that can really hurt us for life. Having said that, sometimes you need to “save” your kids in the moment and give them a consequence later. So I guess if you had a child that was playing with matches and set your house on fire, you’d stand outside and not let the fire brigade in, (no point them dying like that to save your child that had done something stupid), that would teach your child some consequences.

          • jimknowsall

            Yes, of course you try to save your kids or fix their consequences. Why wouldn’t you? The closer analogy would be instead of giving your child a serious talk / punishment for playing with matches, you sue the match manufacturer for not selling them in a child proof container. THAT is the sort of misguided response we are seeing with regards the zoo situation, where we have people blaming the fence, blaming the zoo, blaming the parents…everyone but the person who actually did wrong.

          • KatB

            I don’t think blaming anybody helps in this situation. The zoo acted appropriately and showed they had measures in place to stop a bad situation becoming even worse.

        • luke

          Jim do you have children? If so you’ll know how hard it is to keep them under control. If the kid had been 10 or older then perhaps we could describe it as stupid but a 4 year old is still learning about the world and what danger means.

          • jimknowsall

            Yes, I do have children: 7 and 10. That’s why I think those who say that the parents should have been watching them are misguided. I know full well that it is impossible to watch a child 100% of the time, and nor would I want to. However, whilst children are still learning about dangers and can be impulsive we cannot absolve him of the fact that he seemingly cared little for his parents’ warnings, the large drop and the large animals, each of which most normal children would have been very cautious of choosing to ignore – just as most 4 year olds have a healthy wariness regarding cars and trucks on our road, even if they aren’t very good at judging how to avoid them and when to look out for them.

      • luke

        Oops, sorry didn’t see your response. Fences should be child proof because kids like to test them. It only takes a second for a child to slip your control.

    • JohnO

      It is really easy to make a fence that keeps out all people at all times. it is also cheap and can be done with chicken wire wood and nails if need be. the zoo was negligent and used a poor design of fence to keep the child out.

      • jimknowsall

        Perhaps, though I would argue that people will still get through if they really want to. In any case, why ruin the visitor experience of everyone else by making them look through chicken wire? The 12 foot drop is enough of a barrier to stop all but the most determined. The fence was really just keeping people away from the precipice.

    • luke

      Are you serious? The child was 4 years old. At that age kids don’t know danger and are intensely curious. Yes the parents should have been more vigilant but let he who is without sin etc.

      • lyall

        I would say that if their ever was a time for the parents to be vigilant it would be in front of a poorly fenced gorilla enclosure!

        • hookerphil

          To be fair I would think that when one goes to a well established zoo and are looking at a gorilla with your child you do not have your H&S fence regulation hat on.

          • lyall

            i admit it does seem strange that the zoo design could allow a 4 year old to fall in like that, but like they keep saying it had never happened before!

    • Doug

      Not the kids, he is what, 3? The caregiver at the time was at fault, at the age the kid is the parents or caregivers should be 100% culpable

      • jimknowsall

        With respect, you are completely naïve if you believe that. If a 4 year old wants to leap into a pit despite your admonishments not to, there’s not much you can do. Short of physically holding on to him for the entire duration of a visit to the zoo – a ludicrous idea – you cannot prevent stupid behaviour like that. And looking at the photo, I’d say the kid could probably outrun his rather corpulent parents if he really wanted to avoid being restrained.

        • Doug

          Not trying to offend out anything, but if that is your belief, I would hate to be driving down the road when you are walking a kid…
          There is such a thing as child harnesses, I know a lot of people hate them, claiming that they are degrading to children, but given the choice between that and a safe child, what would you take?

          • jimknowsall

            Sorry Doug, but you are showing your naivety again. Child reins are very seldom used by any parent, though I personally have no big problem with them for particularly impulsive toddlers. However, they are for toddlers from about 1.5 to 2.5 years old. No one would ever, ever put a 4 year old in one. Still, you gave my wife, who is a pre-school teacher, a good belly laugh, which I thank you for.

    • Wilbert

      The 3 year old kid ignored the signs.
      Well what do ya know…

      • jimknowsall

        Even 3 year olds (though I believe the kid here was 4?), understand pictograms that show the danger of falling down a precipice or being attacked by animals etc.

  • Old Dig

    Just another reason why the Donald will win.

  • KatB

    Actually I honestly think that a lot of people think that animal lives matter……..way more than humans. The amount of time and effort that’s put into protecting animals, saving animals, rehoming animals, shame we don’t respect human life as much. Remember the outrage over Cecil the lion. Definitely, animals should not be abused, but when people want to choose an animal over a little kid, somethings wrong. There must be a lot of perfect parents out there commenting, you don’t need to be a lax parent to have a mishap with a kid. At least once everybody realises that this “white” kid has turned into a black kid, people will realise shooting the gorilla was the right thing to do.

  • tas

    I don’t see the racial angle on this story. I think it’s social darwinism, rather than racism. i.e. “If you are dumb enough to climb into an animal enclosure, you deserve the consequences.” (e.g. suicide by tiger is not unheard of, and I don’t think the tiger should be shot in that case.) But I don’t think that should be applied to children.

  • lyall

    you are dead right SB – you couldnt make this stuff up if you tried!
    It sadly does highlight the irreconcilable politics of racism in todays ‘multikulti’ societies, it is way past time that non-white racists are treated with the same disdain as white racists, rather than just reinventing the meaning of the word racist!

  • Andy

    This kid has to live with the death of a Gorilla all of his life. That;s kinda funny.

  • kereru

    An interesting take on the subject:

    ‘The outcry on the web and social media isn’t particularly surprising. There are, no doubt, large numbers of people who speak of animals as if they are of greater value than their fellow human beings. In fact, some on social media have gone so far as to say that the gorilla deserved to live and the human child deserved to die. Some on the internet are demanding #JusticeForHarambe, insisting that what happened to this gorilla is “worse than murder.” Such thinking, of course, puts gorillas on a higher level than humans. How very odd to hear a human being insist that an ape is of greater value than himself. Meanwhile, the ape cannot even articulate such ideas, nor would he return the sentiment in kind if given the chance.

    Such sentiments are easily accounted for in our day. After all, the evolutionary narrative is increasingly dominant in western culture. The question evolutionists need to be able to consistently answer is this: “Given the naturalistic and materialistic worldview, by what standard could anyone say that this gorilla ought to have been killed in order tospare a human child?” The only consistent answer with which one espousing a materialistic worldview ultimately can respond is,
    “arbitrary preference.” ‘

  • Boondecker

    If it were my kid in the hands of a gorilla, near extinction, protected or
    otherwise, I would have taken the shot at the gorilla in a heartbeat.
    Worrying about what social media and the social justice warriors think
    would be the last thing on my mind and I wouldn’t care afterwards too.

    • rua kenana

      Presumably if you were really concerned about your kid, you would have ensured he/she never got into that situation.
      And dogs kill a lot more kids than do gorillas. I’ve never heard of any gorilla ever killing or harming a human kid. Do you take shots at any dogs that might approach your kid?
      And humans are also sometimes pretty good at killing human kids. Remember Moko, etc.

      • Boondecker

        I’ve wanted to shoot many dogs that have appeared threatening to me and mine over the years , but I haven’t had the chance to yet. I usually call animal control and they’ve done that for for me.

        I can’t see what Moko has to do with it. Then again, I saw Labour merge with the Greens yesterday.

      • kereru

        I do wonder how much control of their kids the parents had. Did they do as they were told, or were they allowed to just run around as they pleased – not a great idea in a public place, especially a zoo. A child of 4 is not able to foresee the consequences of his actions and might have ignored a call to get off the fence and come down (assuming there was a call). Something tells me the parents did not have efective control over their children. And yes, I know that it is difficult to keep children under your gaze 100% of the time. But you are ultimately responsible for their behaviour when they are too young to make wise decisions for themselves.

  • Gaynor

    Those twitter comments are terrible ..Can just imagine the howls of outrage if white people were making those comments about a black kid. Is there any follow up on any of them discovering the colour of the boy?

  • LesleyNZ

    Watching the video l had figured out the child was an African American so why could those who have the same skin colour not figure out that the child was black (actually beautiful brown) and not white. How has the world got to a situation where an animal’s life is considered more precious than a human child of 3 years old. There are some in mainstream media who are despicable human beings. This gorilla story has flushed out one such person:KING: Racism has found its way into the Cincinnati Zoo saga: “Laura Collins, in Cincinnati writing for the Daily Mail, published an absolutely despicable piece on the young boy’s parents, including every detail of his father’s criminal history.
    The actual lead and headline for her piece was all about how the young boy’s father, Deonne Dickerson, had committed crimes before.
    Buried deep in the story was the fact that he is gainfully employed and appeared to be a loving father from the myriad of photos found on him. The story, a hit job on Dickerson, has already been shared over 26,000 times on Facebook. Their tweet about his criminal history was one of their most popular of the day yesterday.
    What Laura Collins and the Daily Mail fail to share is that it does not appear that the boy’s father was even at the zoo with his family on Saturday.
    Why then mention him at all? Why name him? Why spell out every mistake this man has ever made if he wasn’t even at the zoo when this happened?
    Even if he was there, do you sincerely think anyone would be talking about his criminal history if he was white? I don’t……..” http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/king-racism-found-cincinnati-zoo-saga-article-1.2655860?a

  • KatB

    Apparently a lot of the disturbing footage has not been aired. A lady on TV last night that was there, said the gorilla had the boy by his leg and was dragging the boy around and the boy’s head was bouncing off the stones and hard surfaces. Probably not meant to be a vicious or violent act on the gorilla’s behalf but still potentially very harmful to the boy.

  • Superman

    Obviously white lives don’t matter but never mind we can look after ourselves.

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