Dopey “journalist” cuddles up to a terrorist’s family

So he’s tried to go join ISIL, he’s threatened a Muslim leader who was assaulted, he’s held a knife to the neck of a motorist and he’s threatened a security guard.

Now a journalist and his family are trying to convince us this man should not go to prison.

The father of Imran Patel, the 26-year-old Aucklander convicted for distributing extremist videos, tells Yasmine Ryan he fears that jail risks turning a silly boy into a serious threat.

When Imran Patel shouted, “Tell John Key to stop being a slave to America, and to get out of Iraq. Allahu akbar!” after being sentenced last Thursday, the courtroom fell silent. It was a frightening moment, but also a tragic one. This was, without a doubt, a defining moment in his life’s trajectory.

For his distraught parents, it might well be the moment they lost their son, in both a physical and a spiritual sense. “That’s what you get!” his father shouted to the courtroom, shaking his head as he and his wife walked out in frustration.

They had been hoping for a sentence of home detention, he says, to allow leaders of the Muslim community to try to talk to Imran. Other members of the community confirmed that there is wide concern in the community for Imran Patel’s hardline, potentially dangerous, views.

What a load of codswallop. Those Muslim leaders can still talk to the scumbag…in prison, during visiting hours.

Imran Patel’s father told me in an interview a couple of days after the sentencing that he is terrified that prison might put his son irreversibly down the path of hardline thinking, and perhaps, action.

“If they keep him for a long time inside, what will happen when he comes back?” said Mr Patel, a businessman involved in his local mosque and with interfaith groups.

His son is the first New Zealander to be convicted under the law for possession of violent videos, a law originally intended for people found with child pornography.

So far, while Patel is obviously an ISIS sympathiser, he does not appear to have any concrete links to the organisation. Indeed, Judge Russell Collins stressed as much, saying: “He’s not being sentenced as a terrorist, he’s not being held as a potential terrorist, he’s not being punished for the views he might hold.”

Patel’s father believes that his son, whom he admits freely is “a silly boy”, is being presented as a monster. He worries this might turn out to be a self-fulfilling prophecy.

“They want to make an example for other people, they’re using him as a guinea pig,” he said. “If they’re going to make him this kind of prisoner, they’re going to make him a dangerous man.”

Judge Collins is somewhat of an idiot in this regard. As for his parents trying to blame prison for a hardening of his son’s already poor attitude…so what? He is already radicalised and it wasn’t in prison. Have they stopped to think that maybe they, and their religion of hate, might have something to do with his attitudes?

Mr Patel senior reminds me of other parents I have encountered in the past few years. Tunisia, where I’ve been living for several years, is the country that has seen the highest number of its youth leave to fight in Syria, Iraq and Libya. Like so many of their compatriots, ISIS recruits are typically disenchanted with political corruption, routine police violence and a negligent state, though overwhelming majority of youth express their disillusionment peacefully and find little to admire in ISIS.

Thousands of youths have left their stunned families behind them. Rarely do they inform their parents of their intentions before they leave.

It was a similar case for Imran Patel three years ago, when his parents received a phone call from Auckland Airport customs to say that their son and his friends had been apprehended trying to go to Syria. That was pre-ISIS, at a time when Western governments were tacitly supporting the armed groups fighting Bashar al-Assad’s government. The three young Kiwis had their passports confiscated for a year. His father is grateful that the New Zealand security services managed to apprehend him, and says he believes Imran would likely be dead today had they not.

“When the SIS spoke to me, they said, ‘Look, it’s not your fault, your son is old enough to do what he’s doing’,” he said. “I said [to the SIS officer], ‘You know, you saved his life. You saved Imran’s life, because if he goes, God knows what he [would do].’”

We know what he would do…kill people in the name of his barbaric 7th century religion of hate.

What a silly “journalist”, cuddling up to and listening to the whining of the family. Their son is a scumbag, he is a Daesh sympathiser and he is clearly in need of a good long stretch in prison.

 

– The Spinoff

 

 


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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