Word of the Day

The word for today is…

armistice (noun) – A temporary cessation of fighting by mutual consent; a truce.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1707, from French armistice (1680s), coined on the model of Latin solstitium etc., from Latin arma “arms”  + -stitium (used only in compounds), from PIE *ste-ti-, suffixed form of root *stā- “to stand”.

The word is attested in English from 1660s in the Latin form armistitium. German Waffenstillstand is a loan-translation from French. Armistice Day (1919) marked the end of the Great War of 1914-18 on Nov. 11, 1918. In Britain, after World War II, it merged with Remembrance Day. In U.S., Armistice Day became a national holiday in 1926. In 1954, to honour World War II and Korean War veterans as well, it was re-dubbed Veterans Day.

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Peter is a fourth generation New Zealander, with both his mothers and fathers folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870’s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is Chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City Committee.