Can someone please put Nick Smith on a leash?

1080 is controversial.  Like democracy, it’s broken, but it’s the best we’ve got.  So to get anywhere near it in an election year is … like so many other things Nick Smith has done last week.

The government is set to introduce new regulations around the use of poisons like 1080.

Currently it is up to regional councils to set rules for the use of 1080 and other poisons in their region.

But now the government will set rules to apply throughout the country, rather than having different rules within each regional council.

Environment Minister Nick Smith said the move was expected to save $11 million over the next 20 years through reduced bureaucracy, and would reduce costs and delays for operators.

“And enable agencies, like the Department of Conservation to get on with the work of protecting New Zealand’s native species.”

He said stoats, rats and possums killed 25 million native birds per year, and the use of effective and efficient poisons like 1080 was necessary.

The national approach to the use of poisons such as 1080 and brodifacoum will come into effect in April.

National are pushing their green credentials really hard right now.  Most of it isn’t coming off very well.  And 1080 is a guaranteed tar pit for politicians.  It’s time Nick Smith is asked to be quiet for a bit.

 

– RNZ


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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