The stupidity of electric cars to save the planet

I loathe electric cars. The mere sight of them makes me want to own a Hummer.

Most people who own them are virtue signalling wankers who drive around in a cloud of smug thinking they are saving the planet.

I do know two people who have electric cars. One owns one so he can bypass traffic on the motorway by travelling in the bus and transit lanes. The other owns one because he can, and he is a tech junkie with a pile of money.

That aside, the rest are mostly tossers, and their cloud of smug is noxious. On top of that, they are deluded in thinking they are making a difference.

One is the expense of switching to an all-electric light vehicle fleet.

Professor Kelly says he expects it will take 10 years for electric cars to make up 5% of the total light vehicle fleet. He estimates converting all cars would cost some $120 billion, not counting the infrastructure of charging stations.  

This means it would cost $500 for every tonne of carbon dioxide to be removed from motor vehicle emissions alone. This compares with less than $100 a tonne to remove it from a coal-fired power station smokestack and likely to reduce to $20-25 by 2020.

He says the Royal Society report lacks the big picture, such as that any worldwide reduction in carbon emissions won’t depend on what happens in New Zealand.

For example, China’s emissions were 260 times that of New Zealand in 2010 and are increasing at the annual rate of increase in New Zealand every two months.

“At great expense we could decarbonise New Zealand for it all to be made up by China in two months.”  

Yep, all it is is virtue signalling.

 

-NBR


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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