The Future of Work can’t save 1500 IRD employees

Inland Revenue staff have been given details of how the organisation will move to cut 1500 of its jobs.

It has previously signalled that staff numbers will be cut by about 30 per cent between 2018 and 2021.

Staff received a document at 3pm on Tuesday and were called into hour-long meetings around the country to discuss the proposed plan.

Inland Revenue said a consultation plan was presented on the first phase of the “organisational redesign”.

Sources said most of the job cuts discussed on Tuesday related to team leader and more senior roles. But most jobs are believed to be changing in some way.

New roles would take effect from January 1.

Staff were told that the organisation wanted people to have broader skill ranges.

A union meeting will be held on Wednesday to discuss the changes, which are still a proposal at this stage.

As more and more IRD functions are shifted online and towards a self-service model, fewer automatons are needed to push the paper around.

And we should not mourn the losses of jobs here.  They represent archaic systems and inefficiencies that must be dealt to lest the IRD continues to be a place to make work for hard to employ people.

 

– Stuff


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

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