“GST to be removed on female hygiene products” petitioner writes to Whaleoil

Melanie and Rebecca – photo via NZ Herald

Whaleoil has always offered an unedited Right of Reply.

Yesterday I commented on the petition to remove GST from feminine hygiene products (If it bleeds, it leads: Petition to remove GST from pads and tampons)

From: “Rebecca” <[email protected]>
Date: 25/05/2017 10:35 AM
Subject: GST to be removed on female hygiene products
To: <whaleoilbeefhooked>

Hi there

It’s Rebecca Jacobs, one of the students involved in the campaign to remove tax on female hygiene products. I would just like to address the fact that we indeed believe that tax should be removed from items such as doctors appointments and fruit and veg but understand this is unattainable at the moment.

We understand that to actually remove the GST from these items would be a very hard task, however are just happy to get the word out there. We do not believe it is right to have tax on an item that we can’t help but buy as a monthly need and intact women spend a lot more than $5 a month on these sanitary products, a majority of women will go through multiple packs a month and that is not including mothers who must buy them for their daughters also.

While you may believe only getting rid of 15% of a cost will not make a difference, it is at least a start and will save money for those who don’t have the money to spare.

Thank you very much
Rebecca Jacobs

Thanks Rebecca.

You have my respect for speaking up and trying to create change in a positive way.   That sets you and your friend apart from most others.

I do choose to disagree with your views, although I understand that you can hold a moral position on what should and what shouldn’t be taxed.

The problem I have is – who decides what’s in or out?

And when governments change and the will of the people is reflected differently, what else will get added or removed from that list?   Will it be used for political agendas to encourage or punish specific industries involved with sugar, salt, fats or what have you?

In the end, taxes to pay for things must come from somewhere.  Just as money to assist those who need it most needs to come from somewhere.

To break the GST system is not the best way to do this, but I accept that’s my view and not yours.

Personally I believe a more effective solution is a community based initiative where churches, doctors clinics,  community centres and schools work in partnership with like-minded businesses.   I would imagine Steve Tindal to be the sort of person that could be approached to see what’s possible.

But before we start that – can you (or anyone) quantify the problem?   Exactly how many women are truly unable to take care of themselves through hardship?

Would a directed and personal approach help them better than a packet of pads that is 50 cents to a dollar cheaper than before?

 

 


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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