Labour wants to rule the country – can’t even announce its list

Photo: RNZ / Claire Eastham-Farrelly

Willie Jackson’s disappointment at his placing at 21 on the list played out in the media on Monday, with Mr Jackson flying to Wellington to voice his disappointment kanohi ki te kanohi.

Mr Jackson said when Mr Little initial approached him about joining the party he said he would try to get him in the top ten, but didn’t work out.

He did, however, get a new role: Māori Campaign Director.

Labour swears that decision was made weeks ago, though it is a little too convenient it was announced just hours after the list was released, and hot on the heels of a clearly robust discussion about Mr Jackson’s place on the list.

Mr Jackson also made much of his disappointment that there were no Māori in the top 15 places on the list.

But he is ignoring the fact that all of Labour’s MPs holding Māori seats opted themselves to go off the list. If they had remained there there would be at least two or maybe three in the top 15.

Labour argues if everything goes to plan the party will end up with 25 percent of its caucus being Maori after the election, a greater proportion than it has ever had.

Women would also make up a greater proportion of Labour’s caucus, with the deck stacked to have the gender balance at 50 percent in line with the party’s rules – up from the current 39 percent of women.

Labour.  More concerned about statistics than competence.

Mr Little himself admits the way it played out on Monday was “unfortunate”, saying the party list deals with people’s careers and livelihoods, and those who spoke out about it did a gross discourtesy to those who wanted their concerns dealt with in confidence.

While it may have been unfortunate, it was also avoidable.

It’s election year and Labour will be wanting to avoid any and all ‘unfortunate’ incidents particularly those that play into National’s narrative of Labour being disorganised and dysfunctional.

It’s not a National narrative.

It’s reality.

 

– RNZ


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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