Labour’s suggestion: One prison for all Maori, run by Maori

Labour’s Kelvin Davis is floating the idea of having a prison for Maori, run by Maori – he says Ngawha Prison in Northland would be a good choice.

Labour’s Kelvin Davis is floating the idea of having a prison for Maori, run by Maori.

He says Ngawha Prison in Northland would be a good choice.

“It would be an excellent place for something like this,” he told Newshub.

The Te Tai Tokerau MP, who is Labour’s corrections spokesman, says there are 18 prisons in New Zealand and one of them could be turned into a Maori prison run along Maori kaupapa lines.

A former inmate interviewed by Newshub said the concept could help reduce reoffending.

The current prison population is 9858 and 5077, or 52 per cent, are Maori.

Oh boy.  What a firecracker.  Where to start?

Apartheid.

Separatism.

Maori parallel justice system.  Like Maori Sharia law if you like.

Next, the sheer size of the problem.  The current prison population exceeds 10,000 people, and 52% are supposedly Maori.

So you need one prison to hold about 5300 people.

Allow for a bit of growth, let’s call it 5500.

That’s the population of Kaitaia, or Kaikohe, if you make it a bit bigger.   Perhaps Labour can buy everyone out of there, put a fence around it and just run it as a prison town for Maori?

Hone could run the place.  People in Whangarei might feel a little cut off, but perhaps just a large wall south of Kaikohe from east to west coast?

Jokes aside… this is Labour policy?  One prison for all Maori?

 

– NZN via NZ City


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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