Macron wins

It appears that Europe is beyond using democracy to expel the Muslim invaders as both in Holland and in France the support tops out around a third of the population.

Macron won between 65.5 and 66.1 percent of the vote ahead of far-right Marine Le Pen on between 33.9 percent and 34.5 percent: estimates  – AFP

It also means Frexit is fended off for now.

 

Here are some vox pops from the people

“It’s so great,” said Catherine Fleurier, 53, a social assistant on the city council, and, like Macron, was elected without party affiliation. “Otherwise we would’ve had to become exiles from our own country. The revolution would start tomorrow.”

Others were less enthusiastic. “I wasn’t even going to vote today,” said Bourak Patrouche, 66, a local bartender. “But I had to. Just to avoid the political catastrophe that would have been the Front National.”

An Algerian immigrant who came to France in the 60s, Patrouche was incensed by Marine Le Pen’s anti-immigrant discourse. “France is a land of welcome,” he said. “Her project was just based on fear and racism – it was completely unrealisable.”

Still, Patrouche, who had voted for the hard left Jean-Luc Mélenchon in the first round, wasn’t particularly enthused by Macron. “When you come from the world of work, you can’t accept a man like that,” he said. “Mélenchon wanted to fight the bourgeoisie – Macron is the bourgeoisie.”

Joffrey Drapeau, 27, had also voted Mélenchon in the first round. “I’m very worried for the future,” he said. “I don’t think this is a victory for Macron: 35%, that’s a big score for Marine Le Pen. That’s a victory for fear.”

Though he’d voted for Macron himself, he was very disappointed with the campaign: “There was no candidate who was truly presidential,” he said. “France’s political system is far from its people: That’s why so many people vote for the FN.”

For Leila Sabri, 49, her vote for Macron had been an act of resistance. “I wanted to show Marine Le Pen that I can be Muslim and French at the same time,” she said. “My religion is a part of me. But France is my country.”

Still, Sabri was so anxious about the result, she hadn’t slept the night before, and the results hadn’t eased her worries completely. “Five years goes quickly,” she said. “If this doesn’t work out, we’ll have Marine as president, that’s for sure.”

 

– Nevers

 


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

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