Act leader David Seymour calls out the ” Public health wowsers”

Total hyperbole from public health wowsers – as usual.

Surely they should be happy that fast food companies are helping to fund sports? How do they propose sports should get funded? How do they think that people will burn off their Double Down without sport?

More seriously, it shows how bitter public health campaigners can be. Example: e-cigarettes are saving thousands of lives, but when public health campaigners came to parliament they opposed the technology because traditional tobacco companies might make money from selling them. Here, they are in favour of sport and activity, but oppose KFC putting their sponsorship money into sport and activity.

-David Seymour F

I’m with David on this one. Sponsorship is great. Fast food in moderation is fine and KFC is helping to promote exercise and sport. The reality is that if we all had to walk or bike to and from work each day most of us would be able to eat whatever we like as we would burn off the calories. If you want to eat more then you need to exercise more. Food is not the problem, how much food we consume and how little we exercise is the problem.

(Photo by David Silverman/Getty Images)

KFC’s deal to sponsor this year’s Rugby League World Cup has been called a coup for the company but a tragedy for public health.

The deal was announced yesterday and has been called a cynical move to get children addicted to fast food.

…The Rugby League World Cup will allow KFC to advertise on the video referee board during try referrals and through virtual signs on the field..

Obesity expert Robyn Toomath said pairing brands like KFC with elite sports was a tragedy for public health and an advertising coup for the chain.

…Despite efforts to curb fast food advertising in schools and hospitals, there was no governmental oversight over what was appropriate at major sporting events, Dr Toomath said.

…”We have such a big problem with morbid obesity in New Zealand.”

…Consumer NZ chief executive Sue Chetwin said the advertising was targeted primarily at children.

“[KFC] is doing it because they want to build up a life-long addiction to their food.”

The link between fast food, obesity and rugby league fans was particularly “insidious”, Ms Chetwin said.

“Rugby league as a game is largely supported by Māori and Pacific Islanders and these children are the children suffering most already.”

Ms Chetwin said the industry wanted to be self-regulated but that did not work and there needed to be government intervention.

…A senior lecturer in sports management at Massey University, Rachel Batty, said the sport industry was in a catch-22.

It was very difficult in New Zealand to secure sponsorship, Ms Batty said.

“The fast food industry are willing and able to support events and supply significant amounts of funding.”

From a sports management perspective, that was excellent, she said.

But she said the flip side was whether it was the most appropriate sponsor for sporting events.

A New Zealand Rugby League spokesperson said the World Cup was an independent event that required sponsorship to proceed, “and we understand and accept that”.

“New Zealand Rugby League has been working to promote health and well-being to our community through our ‘More than just a game’ programme since 2010,” New Zealand Rugby League Community General Manager Jacob Cameron said.

“We know our message is reaching people and that we are having a positive influence.”

-radionz.co.nz


Do you want:

  • Ad-free access?
  • Access to our very popular daily crossword?
  • Access to Incite Politics magazine articles?
  • Access to Podcasts?
  • Access to Political Polls?

Our subscribers’ financial support is the reason why we have been able to offer our latest service; Audio blogs. 

Click Here  to support us and watch the number of services grow.

If you agree with me that’s nice but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo. Look between the lines, do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.

41%