Boris to roll May?

Theresa May ran a terrible campaign, one for which she should be held to account.

There are now calls for Boris Johnson to roll her.

Boris Johnson has been pressed by five other members of the cabinet to oust Theresa May as prime minister as the Tory party descended into a new civil war.

The foreign secretary was contacted by the ministers on Friday morning as the scale of the general election debacle was unfolding and told they would support him if he moved against May.

“A handful of senior people have pledged their loyalty to Boris at cabinet level,” an ally said.

“He has been inundated with messages of support. We are facing a populist and they have realised we need someone who can talk to the people. We need a Brexiteer. Boris is the only option with the liberal values, Brexit credentials and popular appeal.”

With rivals circling, the prime minister was warned she had three days to save her premiership as senior ministers issued ultimatums in exchange for their support. Philip Hammond, the chancellor, signalled that his backing for May was conditional on her moderating her Brexit stance.

The chancellor used a telephone conversation on Friday to tell the prime minister she should put jobs first in her Brexit negotiations – a coded attack on May’s pledge to put controls on immigration at the top of her list.

A source close to Hammond said: “Philip is very keen that these negotiations start on the right foot and that we will put British businesses and jobs first. We can’t lose sight of the fact that the economy is the most important thing for people’s lives.”

The prime minister’s authority was in freefall last night as her two closest aides – joint chiefs of staff Nick Timothy and Fiona Hill – resigned after several cabinet ministers demanded their heads as a “red line” for standing by her.

Is Fiona Hill the UK’s Jo de Joux?

A YouGov poll for The Sunday Times revealed that voters, by a margin of 48 per cent to 38 per cent, believe the prime minister should resign. For the first time Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour leader, has drawn level with May on the question of who would be the best prime minister.

Johnson decided on Friday that challenging May would destabilise the government and risk catapulting Corbyn into Downing Street.

But at least three backbench MPs who want the foreign secretary to take over are contemplating a “kamikaze” attack, forcing a vote of no confidence in May and running as stalking horses against her to pave the way for Johnson to join the contest without being seen as the aggressor.

In a further blow to the prime minister, one of Johnson’s close confidants, the economist Gerard Lyons, attacked her. “I thought the campaign was appalling,” he said. “It reminded me of Project Fear all over again. You’ve got to take parliament and the country with you more than she did. She failed to paint a positive vision.”

She was awful on the campaign trail. She should fall on her sword not execute staff.

 

-The Australian


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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