Winston lays privileges complaint against Bill English

Winston Peters smells blood, and yesterday it was obvious that Bill English lied to the house over his involvement in the Barclay story.

New Zealand First leader Winston Peters said he had filed two privileges complaints against Prime Minister Bill English, claiming he has misled Parliament with his answers to questions about National MP Todd Barclay.

Mr Barclay yesterday announced he would not stand for Parliament again, after new media reports about a recording of a former staff member in the Gore electorate office.

The former staff member, Glenys Dickson, laid a complaint with the police about Mr Barclay making a recording of her in the Gore office.

Mr English has had to defend his actions, after he spoke to the police as part of that investigation, and about his knowledge of a confidentiality agreement struck with Ms Dickson.

Mr Peters said Mr English had been making statements which were untrue and he should be held accountable.

“He was involved, as was the board of the National Party – and no doubt the ninth floor of the Beehive – in the cover up because there was Parliamentary, tax-payer’s money used to get a confidentiality agreement with the person who had the information, who was the complainant.

Mr Peters said that confidentiality agreement was an illegal contract, because it sought to cover-up a crime.

Mr English allowed Mr Barclay to remain on as an MP and as a member of the National Party caucus after the incident.

He informed the electorate chairman about the recording and confidentiality agreement, and was then interviewed by police as part of the investigation.

Earlier today, Mr English said Mr Barclay’s behaviour was not acceptable, in that it led to an employment dispute including with people he had previously worked whom he considered competent, but that was resolved in the “correct” way.

However, he insisted he personally did not try to conceal anything, and left it in the hands of the police.

I’ve always said that Bill English’s DNA is all over the scene of the “crime”.

His text messages to Stuart Davies hang him.

But worse it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to work out that there is no way all this went down regarding Glenys Dickson without a senior National MP or staffer being involved in managing a young MP and problems with his staff. My sources suggest that person is Wayne Eagleson, and that at the behest of both John Key and Bill English he was tasked to sort it all out. Well, that has now backfired with what appears to be an exceedingly loose confidentiality agreement with Glenys Dickson…who has form in stabbing MPs.

Bill English does know the details, he said as much to Stuart Davie. He most certainly does know what went down because Wayne Eagleson is his chief of staff and was John Key’s chief of staff at the time. On top of that at least two of the whips must know as well. You certainly don’t let a young MP handle all this by himself.

What Bill English faces now, and he will be wishing he hadn’t sent in Paula Bennett to threaten Barclay with withdrawing the whip, is evidence being called from Todd Barclay, and he won’t have two whips either side of him making sure he says what has been agreed to.

This story ain’t over yet. National has a bad habit of not looking after people, and that could get messy.

 

-RadioNZ


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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