Media Party conjures up Alt-right straw man for the election

It was incredible the outrage that the Media Party created when a group of Auckland University students attempted to create a European cultural group on campus. Outrageous smears and claims were fired from all directions based on the flimsiest of evidence. Even Race Relations Commissioner Susan Devoy jumped in boots and all it was totally insane.

Now with the election only a couple of months away the Media Party have created an Alt-right straw man to attack claiming that New Zealand has a growing alt-right movement. Hilariously the article reveals that they have diabolical plans to influence the election by using memes!

Memes linking popular right-wing cartoon character Pepe The Frog and symbols of New Zealand have been doing the rounds among alt-right supporters.

Most of the views expressed by the so-called alt-righters in the article are mainstream conservative concerns. The article attempts to paint them as extreme viewpoints. As it is a long article I have summarised the viewpoints quoted as well as the language the journalist used to describe the viewpoints.

How the journalist described the viewpoints and the people who expressed them:

  • hoping their antics would generate a media frenzy.
  • [faced] accusations of racism
  • accused journalists of suppressing dissenting voices
  • Described as Racism 2.0, the group’s ongoing preoccupation is the idea that whites will become extinct. With a large base among men’s rights activists, online trolls and gamers, its members are also anti-feminist, anti-media and anti-“normie” – their name for anyone who isn’t alt-right
  • Members are the self-declared disenfranchised – largely young, educated, angry men who spend large amounts of time online. While many are new to the political arena, others have drifted across from the country’s older neo-Nazi groups, or so-called “anti-separatist” movements, such as Don Brash’s current Hobson’s Pledge campaign.
  • They believe concepts such as white genocide and cultural Marxism  … that claims Marxists infiltrated the west to destroy Christian values and replace them with feminism, multiculturalism, gay rights and atheism. Most align somewhere close to the nationalist spectrum.
  • Communication in the alt-right swings wildly between the ultra-earnest and extreme-ironic, with everything cloaked in multiple layers of jargon and vulgarity designed to confuse and enrage the liberal left.
  •  is largely focused on pushing freedom of speech and fomenting Islamophobia, rather than talking openly about white nationalism.
  • On the phone he is softly spoken and eloquent, in juxtaposition to his online persona, where he calls Muslims “kebabs”; the Herald the “enemedia”; and drag queens reading to children a “cancer”.
  • is passionate about freedom of speech, saying people should be allowed to say what they want online without fear of recrimination.

The quoted and paraphrased viewpoints of the Kiwi “alt-right”

  • “We get called racist, xenophobic, backward – it’s almost like a knee-jerk reaction,” he says. “But the fact is, the people in these groups … they are simply average people who are tired of being shut down for having legitimate concerns and are looking for real, honest, non-PC representation.”
  • Tors-Kilsen, a member of Make New Zealand Great Again, says he believes people who would have never before considered themselves alt-right, or even right-wing, are starting to join the groups because they have genuine concerns about where New Zealand is going – particularly around immigration.
  • “We have homeless people, we have massive poverty … and we’re bringing in immigrants but not looking after our own people,” he says.
  • A former member of the now-defunct Kiwis Against the Islamification of NZ, he also believes that radical Islam simply doesn’t fit with New Zealand culture and there should be a conversation about that.
  • “We’re seeing a lot of terrorist attacks all over the world, it’s concerning. New Zealand is a great place and there are concerns that ideology is going to come here. So how do we stop it coming here?”
  • Taiwanese migrant Sylvester Kuo, 23, is a member of Make New Zealand Great Again too. The former president of Young Act… says he wouldn’t even consider himself part of the alt-right. Yet he describes himself as a “civic nationalist” who is “weary of multiculturalism” and supports racial assimilation.
  • Kuo is passionate about freedom of speech, saying people should be allowed to say what they want online without fear of recrimination. “People can take offence but it shouldn’t be criminal,” he says. ” It’s one thing to tell someone you’re offended it’s another to send them to prison.”
  • He says he’s not against people of different skin colours but that segregation creates disharmony. “The best approach … is not to accommodate more backward practices that some people might have … like wearing burqa, or female genital mutilation.
  • “I’ve seen a few burqa in NZ. It’s quite concerning. A security concern.”
  • “It means I support people’s rights in their own country. So as an ethno-nationalist [in New Zealand] I have to go out and support Europeans,”

The political experts consulted by the journalist totally dismissed the validity of the concerns expressed by the young men interviewed.

University of Canterbury Associate Professor in sociology Mike Grimshaw believes the claims of a loss of privilege are unjustified.

…”The feeling of disenfranchisement among some young white men does make sense – even if it isn’t actually legitimate,”

This is because the alt-right actively promote the idea that with growing racial and gender equality, white men are being discriminated against.

“This is patently untrue…

-The NZ Herald

 


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