Amy Adams wants to apologise to gay men

The Government will make a formal apology… to New Zealand men who were convicted of homosexual offences under outdated laws.

Justice Minister Amy Adams will move a motion in Parliament before the first reading of a bill which will allow people to have convictions for homosexual activity wiped.

The motion will read: “I move that this House apologise to those homosexual New Zealanders who were convicted for consensual adult activity, and recognise the tremendous hurt and suffering those men and their families have gone through, and the continued effects the convictions have had on them.”

Adams’ office said the motion had been circulated and discussed with all parties in Parliament, who will be given an opportunity to speak.

I’m not sure an apology is needed.  It would mean that the people who enforced the law back then made some kind of mistake.  And I reject that strongly.   We had laws that needed enforcement.  At no stage should we have to apologise for that.

Around 1000 New Zealanders were convicted of indecency between males, sodomy, or keeping places of resort for homosexual before law reform in 1986.

Not all of them will be eligible to have their records wiped because they were also convicted of other offences.

When the law change was announced, Adams said those with convictions “continued to be tainted with the stigma of criminality”. Past laws criminalising homosexual acts had not represented modern New Zealand for some time, she said.

No problem with the convictions for unlawful homosexual acts being removed from records in the light of subsequent law reform.

But a formal apology by the State for enforcing the law at the time is absurd.

 

– NZ Herald


Do you want:

  • Ad-free access?
  • Access to our very popular daily crossword?
  • Access to daily sudoku?
  • Access to Incite Politics magazine articles?
  • Access to podcasts?
  • Access to political polls?

Our subscribers’ financial support is the reason why we have been able to offer our latest service; Audio blogs. 

Click Here  to support us and watch the number of services grow.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

33%