Effed up wards of the state, literally and figuratively can expect no help from the Children’s Commissioner

Between the 1950s and ’90s, about 100,000 New Zealand children were made wards of the state, and some now say they suffered sexual, physical and psychological abuse, while in the institutions.

This week, some of the survivors presented a petition at Parliament calling for a public inquiry.

The Children’s Commissioner’s office was set up in 1989, and has been able to investigate issues affecting children since then.

Current Commissioner Judge Andrew Becroft said he thought the idea of a formal national apology would be very meaningful to victims.

However, the office would be in conflict calling for an inquiry, he said.

Playing with words.  It doesn’t matter who calls for an inquiry.  Hell, the Greens can do it for you if you want.  

“We had at least a role in monitoring and assessing the services which would have stopped any abuse,” he said.

“So in a sense I’d be calling for an inquiry that would be assessing our own performance over 11 years, so that’s probably not appropriate for me to do that.

He said the office had been given a Budget increase that would boost staff, and was very committed to ensuring such abuse did not happen in future.

“So we’re giving strong advice on a new independent complaints system that we hope will be developed.”

Speaking earlier on TV3’s The Nation, he said it “would be inconsistent of me to publicly and enthus support it when actually we don’t exactly have clean hands ourselves.”

“We were part of the process that should’ve stopped it.”

Well, if it helps, Whaleoil calls for an inquiry.   Now that’s sorted, get all the dirty laundry out and stop playing with words.



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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.