Headline of the Year

Politicians need to be more positive about immigration this election year to steer away from “ignorance and misrepresentations” about migrant communities, the Federation of Multicultural Councils says.

Because we all need to be so careful not to upset the Federation of Multicultural Councils.  

Executive director Tayo Agunlejika said most policies focused on limiting immigration, and there wasn’t enough focus on the positive effects migrants brought to the New Zealand economy.

His comments follow a recent policy proposal from Immigration Minister Michael Woodhouse to tighten work visa rules – which has prompted the horticulture and hospitality industries, as well as small dairy worker towns, to protest it would deprive them of workers.

Mr Agunlejika said the council felt compelled to hold the event before the upcoming 2017 general election because of the negativity surrounding recent immigration issues.

He said politicians attending the event needed tell the public what was driving their policies, and “look into their eyes” and answer questions.

One in four New Zealand residents were born overseas, and 87 percent of migrants felt they belonged in New Zealand, but a third of New Zealanders did not think migrants were well integrated, he said.

And therein lies the answer.  The elephant in the room is that immigrants themselves want immigration curtailed.  There has been too much of it, and there is no sign of it slowing down with another record recorded as recent as last month.

On top of that, people that live in New Zealand are much more specific about who they want to come here.  In general few people are completely anti-immigration, but more and more are questioning if we really need more Chinese, more Indians and more Muslims…. right now.

Can we perhaps have some time to catch up with infrastructure?

Not a lot of this is driven by racism, but instead by concerns about poor government policy and the cost and downsides of stresses on our roading, education, health and just about everything else.

 

– RNZ


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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