Some questions for Metiria

Guest post

“Meteria Turei represents herself as a champion of the underdog and an example of someone who has climbed from a difficult beginning to success.

But at the same time she has pursued another person with an even more challenging background (John Banks) and hounded him with a pursuit that could only be called vindictive in Parliament over his own lesser misdemeanour for which he has since been found innocent.

Now she wants to impose her views as policy on all of us, supported by a sketchy self-serving account of her thin and vague admission of fraud.

It deserves examination.

For some period between 1993 when her child was born and 2000 when she became a paid lawyer in Auckland she concedes that she defrauded taxpayers by failing to declare income from extra people sharing her rent. Vague dates, no details, nothing else.

Is that all?

Others have claimed that she did not reveal the father of her child (born in 1993).  In fact he is easily identified.  The father was Paul Hartley, the son of Ann Hartley a Labour MP and prominent politician, who gave them “continuing support”.

“Nine-year-old Piupiu Turei woke yesterday morning to find both her mother and grandmother were members of Parliament.

But it was not long yesterday before she discovered that her mother, Metiria Turei – No 8 on the Green Party list – would be joining Piupiu’s grandmother Ann Hartley, the Labour MP for Northcote, in Parliament.

Mum, an unsuccessful Auckland mayoral candidate last year and an unemployed contract lawyer who has worked for the Greens fulltime since March, said Ann Hartley had always been supportive of Piupiu, herself and her family.

Metiria Turei is separated from Ms Hartley’s son Paul.”

Question: Did she receive financial support for herself and her daughter and was this disclosed for her DPB?

Not long after, in 1994 she met the “love of her life”  Warwick Stanton and good on her for that.

‘A computer programmer when he met Turei in 1994, he turned house husband when they moved from Auckland to Dunedin eight years ago. ‘  

Question: Did the love of her life live with her or contribute to her financial circumstances and was that disclosed when she received the DPB?

Then in 1995/6 she applied for and received the Training Incentive Allowance, an extra payment only available to women on the DPB or other beneficiaries.  It may have covered much of the costs of her 3-4 years’  study.

 “After becoming a single Mum at 22, Metiria realised she needed a career that would set her up well to care for her daughter. Using a training incentive allowance, she put herself through law school, graduating in 1999 from Auckland University and going on to work as a commercial lawyer at Simpson Grierson.”           ‘

Question: Did she disclose all of the circumstances; the original father and his contributions if any, the new partner and his role if any, the flatmates, when she accessed that funding?

Keep in mind that during this whole period she stood for Parliament twice (McGillicuddy 1993, Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party 1996) and completed a law degree.   Where is the detail and where is the excuse of ignorance?

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.