Tell them they’re dreamin’

These guys need to have a counselling session with Darryl Kerrigan:

New political party Kia Koe offers engagement and education to NZ youth through online submissions.

  • Secondary Schools have access to a tool online for engaging youth in politics
  • Empowering youth by inclusion in policy development
  • Role of law and justice is measured and approved by upcoming young voters
  • Youth get to question and debate the various roles of Government.
  • Participation in successive elections encouraged through education and engagement.  

Newly fledged online political platform Kia Koe wants to engage minors over the age of 12 and offers those over 16 years of age to suggest and vote for policies that resonate with them.

Kia Koe provides a better approach for politics using four of six categories – Information (Facts), Financial Info, Environment, Education, Health and Spiritual. It’s easy to use tools enable members to vote and rate policy suggestions on the website.

Kia Koe’s concept originator Chris Kernot says when people sign up for Kia Koe (which means ‘You choose.’) they can comment using the four categories for a more rounded outcome.

Kernot is aiming for students to be more politically savvy through the use of Kia Koe as an interactive, functional political party IT platform. He says he is anticipating teachers and students involvement at secondary school as Kia Koe encourages discussion.

“We’re wanting to enhance what can be a special learning experience. Students are being prepared for either their first opportunity to vote in the upcoming elections or when they are of age for proceeding elections.”

As an introduction to political processes Kia Koe offers a voice for youth. It also provides an opportunity to link to significant news stories providing appropriate background to new policy suggestions.

“By discussing policy decision making the youth ranking becomes more productive, focused, and the student more mindfully involved,” Kernot offers.

He says before commenting students should read all prior comments. It’s by reading, embracing, including and refining views that policies take shape in Kia Koe. Ranking a policy may see it rise in the list. Other Kia Koe members can then rate their personal reaction to the policy from ‘do not support’ to ‘strongly support.”

A second view called The Other Side of the Coin, allows students to consider both negative and positive views producing more balanced options or scenarios.

While those under 16 can’t vote, they can suggest policies and review the suggestions of others, stimulating discussion and debate.

“We are providing platforms for the education of our future custodians as ultimately they will need to take ownership of their own political direction.”

You are wasting your time. Dreamin’ in fact.

Unless you are going to offer boxes of Woody’s and doobies at the polling booth you aren’t going to get youth interested.

 

-Scoop


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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