Word of the day

The word for today is…

hustings (noun) – 1. (a) A place where political campaign speeches are made.
(b) The activities involved in political campaigning.
2. (Chiefly British) A court formerly held in some English cities and still held infrequently in London.
3. (Chiefly British) (a) A platform on which candidates for Parliament formerly stood to address the electors.
(b) The proceedings of a parliamentary election.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Old English husting “meeting, court, tribunal,” from Old Norse husðing “council,” from hus “house” + ðing “assembly”; so called because it was a meeting of the men who formed the “household” of a nobleman or king. The native Anglo-Saxon word for this was folc-gemot. The plural became the usual form circa 1500; sense of “temporary platform for political speeches” developed by 1719, apparently from London’s Court of Hustings, presided over by the Lord Mayor, which was held on a platform in the Guildhall. This sense then broadened by mid-19th century to “the election process generally.”

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Peter is a fourth generation New Zealander, with both his mothers and fathers folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870’s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is Chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City Committee.