Forestry is very very happy with the new government

Forest Owners Association President Peter Clark says the new government’s target of an additional 50,000 hectares of planting a year is ‘optimistic but achievable’.

“For most of the 1990s, the new planting rate was more than 50,000 hectares a year. In 1994 it was 100,000 hectares beyond keeping up with replanting.”

That’s not an additional 50,000 then.  The problem is the additional part.  Is the whole industry going to stop planting and count the government’s effort?  Don’t think so.  They are going to put in an extra 50,000 on top of the industry’s replanting rate.

Unless the government is going to change how it measures planting, like they appear to be doing for measuring poverty and unemployment, in which case they’ll succeed just fine.

“We’ve been talking with Shane Jones about what can and can’t be achieved and he is in no doubt about some of the difficulties of getting more plantings going after more than a decade of no growth.”

“In particular we do need to build the labour force to do the planting. At the moment we are struggling to plant enough trees to maintain the present area. We hope that Shane Jones being Minister of Regional Development will help in that respect.”

Peter Clark says the idea of a separate Forest Service sounds like a good idea.

“We don’t know what functions it will have, so we have to wait for that. But with forestry under the Ministry of Primary Industries we weren’t getting the attention an industry should get when it earns six billion dollars a year in exports.”

“The forest sector won’t be completely disconnected from MPI though. As well as agriculture, Damien O’Connor has a biosecurity portfolio, and that is a huge priority right across the primary sector,” Peter Clark says.

“There are a number of pests and diseases which we don’t have, but which would have a huge impact right across agriculture and forestry if they ever got into New Zealand.”

Peter Clark says James Shaw taking on the role of the Minister of Climate Change is significant.

“As Green Party leader, his influence will keep the government focus on doing something practical about climate change. The only practical solution is planting more trees. That’s the only currently available technology to significantly pull down our level of carbon emissions.”

Peter Clark believes the just announced partial introduction of agriculture into the Emissions Trading Scheme will also give a boost to forest planting on farms.

They will need to start converting farms.  There isn’t 500,000 ha of unused land ready to convert to forestry without it.

The problem will be that it won’t just be Radiata.  The Greens will want to have a lot of natives planted.  And the automation and efficiencies that exist for Radiata forestry tech simply doesn’t translate to native species.

 


Do you want:

  • Ad-free access?
  • Access to our very popular daily crossword?
  • Access to daily sudoku?
  • Access to Incite Politics magazine articles?
  • Access to podcasts?
  • Access to political polls?

Our subscribers’ financial support is the reason why we have been able to offer our latest service; Audio blogs. 

Click Here  to support us and watch the number of services grow.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

39%